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11/22/63: A Novel Paperback – Jul 24 2012


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Paperback, Jul 24 2012
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 880 pages
  • Publisher: Gallery Books; Canadian Edition edition (July 24 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1451694954
  • ISBN-13: 978-1451694956
  • Product Dimensions: 22.9 x 15.2 x 5.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #63,415 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Gabriel Boutros on March 13 2014
I grew up a huge Stephen King fan, reading pretty much everything he wrote; but that was back when he stuck to his great horror novels. As he moved away from straight horror, even though his novels always had a touch of the strange and/or supernatural to them, I found myself passing on more and more of his books, so that I can’t remember which of his books I read recently. This book looked interesting enough for me to give it a try, and I was so happy I did. Time travel is not exactly an original topic for fiction writers, but King deals with it as only he can.
The story's hero is Jake Epping, and he goes back through time through this strange (and totally unexplained) portal, always ending up on the exact same day in 1958, and in the same small town of Lisbon Falls, Maine. This means he can't go further back in time (and kill Hitler, for example), and in order to try to save JFK he has to live five years in the past to do it, making his way to Dallas and spying on Lee Harvey Oswald in the process.
This gives King an opportunity to explore the differences between the world of 50 years ago and today: Epping runs into very different politics, sexual mores, and societal values, although he’s pretty good at adjusting his attitude on the fly. But he not only has to learn to live in this world which is quite alien to him, he also has to fight against the past which does not want to be changed. And all this time he is never certain of what kind of impact his actions will have on the world in the future.
Epping is an everyman, not a super hero; he wants very much to set things right, but he doesn't necessarily have the best knowledge or the ability to do so.
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Stephen King blends time travel and love story together. It's been done before, but with King's story telling and twisted plot, 11/22/63 is a page turner.
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As you may have heard, this book is about time travel and the possibility of returning into the past to stop evil things from happening. If I had a time machine, I would go back and stop the younger me from picking up this 800+ page P.O.S.

I had never read any Stephen King before, but after enjoying many movies based on his books - The Shinning, Stand By Me, The Shawshank Redemption - I thought it was about time that I read one of his novels, and not being a real horror fan, this seemed to be a good selection for me.

Stephen King wasn't able to come up with one real, genuine character here. His protagonist is approximately my age (mid-30s), yet when he sings in his car, he ends up singing all the lyrics to a Rolling Stone's song rather than a Nirvana, Oasis, or House of Pain tune that he would have grown up listening to in the U.S. in the early 90s when he would have been a TEENAGER. The mentality of this character is more like someone Stephen King's age rather than my own. Other characters are just paper-thin throwaways.

This is an awful book. It is horribly written. It is also incredibly boring.

Unless you have a time machine and can go back and undo past transgressions, stay away from this "book".
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By Toni Osborne TOP 100 REVIEWER on Dec 23 2013
The novel is about a time traveller who attempts to prevent the assassination of President Kennedy. It is of no surprise that this sci-fi story quickly became a bestseller once published and stayed on that list for many additional weeks.

Those around in the 1950’s and early 1960’s would acknowledge that Mr. King did intensive research to accurately portray the real-life events and people of the time. We have minutia details such as the price of beer, article of clothing, appliance, etc. Boy did things change since then….

This isn't the usual horror stories fans are accustomed to but rather one that reaches an entire different audience, those readers who love historical fiction with a mixture of the ordinary and the supernatural, pretty weird but I assure you quite entertaining. It is also rife with answers: can we change history, can a man make a difference and does love surpass everything. But there is also a darker side: a what if…what if history is too mighty to redirect?

This is a book for weight lifters my electronic version once leaded on my Blackberry Playbook was over 1500 pages so it was clear in advance that the protagonist would undertake a long trial mission…..Out of the rabbit hole suddenly back on Sept 9, 1958, it’s 11.58am. Each trip and no matter how long you've stayed in the past….only two minutes have gone by in the present….

This novel is an intensely character based novel. The slow intimacy in the narrative is compelling. Mr. King’s manages to maintain suspense throughout the pages by inserting very effective twists on the theme and bringing back powerful emotions. 11/22/63 is a marvelous re-invention of time.
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Let me start by first stating that the only other Stephen King book I've read is "The Shining". I have never found my tastes to roam towards the horror genre, which was why I was apprehensive about this book. I consulted with some friends who had read it and asked their opinion--most said that it was quite a departure from his typical work.

After the first few chapters I was, indeed, hooked! I would not classify this story as a `horror' but there were some definitely creepy parts! What shocked me the most was the depth of writing and the stylized vocabulary from the 50's era, the Texans, and the New Englanders. It was very enjoyable to be immersed in a different time/place for a spell.

The first third of the book flew by! The `bubble in time', the thrilling Clayton-Family-Murder sequence and the romance between George a.k.a. Jake and Sadie were immersive. The second third in which George spends most of this time spying on Oswald was a little long for me. I lost interest and began to long for some action and a conclusion to the endless eaves-dropping. The final third was very interesting--the harmonies and the repetitions that kept occurring in the past were chilling at times. And of course, the `altered' present when George/Jake returned to 2011 was obviously a shock.

At the conclusion, I found myself wondering what really would have happened had Kennedy been saved. I'm not American, but I found the idea very interesting none-the-less. Also, not being American, I learned a lot about the history surrounding the event of Kennedy's assassination. The 'Book Depository' was unknown to me and though I knew the name of Lee Harvey Oswald (I live in Canada, not under a rock!) I really didn't know anything about him or who he was.
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