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1493: Uncovering the New World Columbus Created Hardcover – Deckle Edge, Aug 9 2011


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 560 pages
  • Publisher: Knopf; First edition (Aug. 9 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9780307265722
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307265722
  • ASIN: 0307265722
  • Product Dimensions: 23.9 x 16.9 x 4.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 907 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #97,218 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Schmadrian TOP 500 REVIEWER on Oct. 18 2011
Format: Hardcover
Sometimes a book reveals things you didn't know. Sometimes a book goes further, and opens up new territory.

'1493' falls into the latter category for me.

And when combined with Mann's earlier effort, '1491', what results potent: enlightenment-on-steroids.

I think just the premise alone, that 'globalization' isn't anything new, that it's been at play much, much longer than the average person might guess (although they wouldn't guess at all), and the proof of this truth is sufficient to make this book required reading.

But more important than what I learned from '1493' is what I'm coming to understand about the world.

My gratitude to Mr. Mann for having delivered such a prodigiously informative and inspiring tome.
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By Brian Griffith TOP 500 REVIEWER on Feb. 19 2014
Format: Paperback
It's hard to praise this book too much. The writing is just as good as anything by Jared Diamond or Alfred Crosby. And rather than presenting his research like a lecture, Mann follows questions wherever they lead like a detective. And the trail leads everywhere -- the pirate coast of China, the trader bays of the Philippines, the rubber plantations of the upper Amazon, the mines of Peru. or the ruins of Christopher Columbus's house on the coast of Dominica. Why, Mann asks, did certain planters go toward a slave economy, and how was that shaped by the spread of malaria from the Old World? Mann follows the path of invasive species and crops as they spread through the world, causing booms or busts of economies and human populations. It's the story of the Homogenocene, the planet's new age of biological interpenetration of every environment, which for better or worse is our evolving reality since "contact" between the hemispheres.
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By Dr. Gabriella Kadar on Aug. 3 2012
Format: Paperback
that Samurai warriors guarded the silver laden mule trains in Mexico? Or that the Chinese emperor went bust because taxation was based on the weight and not the value of silver?

Charles Mann has included so much in this book that is both fascinating and informative. The means and methods of globalization back during the time when Spain was a major player is relevent to the goings on today in regards to the Chinese influence on trade, prices and products. The customers are different, the products are different but the mindset has not changed. Possibly this is one of the points of insight Mr. Mann has provided by writing this book.
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By Donald Mitchell #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Nov. 7 2011
Format: Hardcover
"We know that we are of God, and the whole world lies under the sway of the wicked one." -- 1 John 5:19 (NKJV)

Don't miss this book! It's a tour de force!

In 1493, author Charles C. Mann accomplishes that most difficult of all nonfiction tasks: changing our perception of the world as it is . . . and how it got to be that way. Bravo!

To make the points easier to appreciate, he focuses on a few economic, biological, and physical aspects of how Columbus's voyages fundamentally changed the world. You'll learn about trading silver for silks in the Philippines, the influence of malaria and yellow fever on slavery, how crops and agricultural practices create other problems and opportunities, a sovereign debt crisis in Spain, hidden "kingdoms" of escaped slaves, miracle crops you think of as being part of "home" that you didn't realize came from another continent, and many stupid things that greedy people and governments do. You'll come away with a sense of wonder about how small things can become huge influences.

The book, no doubt, will also encourage you to want to read more about the topics raised in it. In some cases, you'll want to visit places you've never thought about before. The excellent footnotes will make either activity easy to pursue.

In my case, I realized what a close thing it was that I'm alive today. If my Scottish indentured servant ancestors had been sent to North Carolina rather than Delaware, you probably wouldn't be reading this review.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Len TOP 100 REVIEWER on Oct. 2 2011
Format: Hardcover
Columbus came to the Americas in 1492 and began an exchange of animals, plants, culture, and human populations that would change the world's ecology forever. Mann describes time when he went to the local greenhouse to purchase plants for his garden and complained that they were not locally grown. What did he mean by that? Plants indigenous to his New England home? What would those be? Tomatoes? Think again. Those come from South America. Potatoes? Same region. And corn as well. The regions of the world have become so interconnected biologically, economically and culturally that it becomes difficult to know the origin of anything. When Miguel Lopez de Legazpi and Andres de Urdaneta started the trade of silver in the Philippines, a system of trade was begun that would forever change the way China did its business. In point of fact, the people of China would become so dependent on silver as medium of exchange that they would accept no other. And Mr. Mann provides the same evidence for mankind. In Panama, the races became so mixed that unique identities are created by hybrid groups who have little or no connection with their origins in Africa or Spain or South America which brings us back the thesis of this entire book. Humankind, the vegetation and animal species he has spread have become so intertwined that the origin of each has lost much of its meaning.
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