Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.

CDN$ 30.00 + CDN$ 3.49 shipping
In Stock. Sold by polski_film

or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here

1920 Bitwa Warszawska

Dariusz Kordek , Jerzy Hoffman    PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)   DVD
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
List Price: CDN$ 44.95
Price: CDN$ 30.00
You Save: CDN$ 14.95 (33%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 3 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by polski_film.
Today Only: 60% off "Robin Hood: The Complete BBC Series"
Own Robin Hood: The Complete BBC Series at a one-day special price.
Join Amazon Student in Canada


Product Details


Product Description

REGION 0 IMPORT FROM POLAND DVD. WILL PLAY ON MOST NORTHAMERICAN DVD PLAYERS. ENGLISH SUBTITLES Battle of Warsaw 1920 (pol. Bitwa warszawska 1920) is a Polish historical film directed by Jerzy Hoffman depicting the events of the Battle of Warsaw (1920) of the Polish-Soviet War. It was released in September 2011. It was filmed in 3D using the Fusion Camera System and is one of the most expensive movies in the history of cinema in Poland. 1920...Poland, led by its charismatic commander Marshal Jozef Pilsudski, is forced to fight again for its newly regained independence. The enemy occurs to be stronger than most pessimistic anticipations could ever foresee: it is the army of the Bolsheviks driven by furious desire to light the 'flame of world revolution' by robbing, raping, killing and treading on Poland's corpses westwards. Yet, history sometimes proves to be more unpredictable than ever...

Customer Reviews

3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.5 out of 5 stars
4.5 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
By Tommy Dooley HALL OF FAME TOP 10 REVIEWER
Format:DVD
This is a film from Polish director Jerzy Hoffman (‘Fire and Sword’ and ‘Army of Valhalla’) who uses a love story to retell what happened in the post World War I mess when The Red Russian Army decided to export the revolution going on there to the rest of Europe via Poland.

We meet Jan and Ola who are madly in love with each other. He is a romantic member of the intelligentsia who want the Worlds onanists (or ‘self pleasurers’) to unite against boring art sub groups, such as ‘cubists’ and she is a performer at a cabaret where she has more than her fair share of admirers. Then the mobilisation is ordered and Jan marries Ola before mounting his horse, before he gets to do the same favour to her, and rushes off to fight the Bolsheviks at the front. He is soon in the thick of it and as the newly formed Red Army rolls forward to create the new Soviets of Europe all of Poland gets swept up into war with Ola even giving up the feather boa for a Maxim gun.

This is described as a ‘high octane action packed’ war film, but is it? Well there are some battle scenes and on the whole they are all pretty well done. We have some average CGI bits but they never last too long and are ok as they are used for context most of the time rather than the pretend ‘action’ that you sometimes encounter. The period detail seems pretty good and we do get the political analysis that is always appreciated in a war of this nature. The acting is all well above par and the two main leads are particularly convincing in their respective love roles.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Format:DVD
Polish director Jerzy Hoffman brings one of the world's most decisive battles to film in 1920 Bitwa Warszawska (The Battle of Warsaw). This 2011 film has special effects galore and happens to be the first Polish movie made in 3D. It evokes feelings of a historic epic and is teeming with the best Polish actors (and even a few Russian actors too).

Poland just resurfaced on the map in 1918 after 123 years of being wiped off the map by her neighbors, but trouble is never too far away. Thankfully, Poland has strong leaders like Jozef Pilsudski (Daniel Olbrychski), Jozef Haller (Jacek Poniedzialek) and Boleslaw Wieniawa-Dlugoszowski (Boguslaw Linda) that are able to defend her from the Soviet invaders that would like to see socialism across all of Europe. There only stands one thing in the way from spreading socialism across the world: Poland.

1920 Bitwa Warszawska tries to balance spoon-feeding us historical details that give the story context with the personal side of the war by showing us how the war affected the lives of a newlywed couple. Jan Krynicki (Borys Szyc) marries her girl Ola Raniewska (Natasza Urbanska) just before he is sent out to war. While the frame of the story is a romance, it doesn't develop this part of the story too greatly as there is so much other things that need to be shown. The film takes on a lot in a short amount of time, so it could have easily been at least an hour longer to develop the details in greater depth, but then some would complain the film is too long.

Jan is seemingly sympathetic to socialistic ideas, which gets him in trouble with his fellow soldiers, but ends up saving his life as well.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.2 out of 5 stars  9 reviews
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars At last a suppressed historical battle exposed to the world Sept. 18 2012
By Ronald Ostrowski - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
My Polish father, who himself served with the Free Polish Forces fighting alongside the allies in almost every theatre of the European campaign against the Germans and their allies, always spoke of how his father fought the Russians to ensure the liberty of a re-emerged Polish State. I have since read the historial accounts by Norman Davies and Adam Zamoyski.

Now we have none other than the very competent Polish Director, Jerzy Hoffman, bringing it to the screen in 3D. Sadly, living in Australia I doubt whether the blu-ray version for my region will ever become available. It is not yet available even in the dvd version here, and for that I thank the existence of Amazon which allows me to obtain recently made Polish films.

As a plot this film has it all. It has huge battle scenes, a love story and some historical terms of reference. However, it should be remembered that in 1919 Pilsudski wanted to re-establish a powerful confederation of states akin to what was once the great Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. However, he was somewhat imperialistic as well. What is also glossed over is that the Poles were not only fighting Russian Reds, but also Ukrainian, Belarussian and Lithuanian nationalists. They were also fighting Germans in Silesia. Furthermore, after defeating Russia the Poles took a lot of Ukrainian, Lithuanian and Belarussian territory and this lost them valuable allies against the German and Russian invasions of 1939.

Overall, although missing a number of historical reference points it is a beautifully shot film and a great story.
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars This History Deserves A Better Film Feb. 9 2012
By Steve Perlowski - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
If you've seen the trailer, you've seen the best that this film has to offer; the rest is visually stunning (but uninspiring) filler. Poland defeated the Bolsheviks decisively in the 1920 battle for Warsaw, but "Bitwa Warszawska" twists the ropes of that great historical encounter into pure bathos.

With a couple of exceptions (e.g., Adam Ferency as the rabid communist Bukowski, or Olga Kabo as his disillusioned "war" wife), the actors, especially the beautiful Natasza Urbanska, give leaden portrayals of the film's various fictional and historical personalities, and I was particularly disappointed by the stilted caricature of Marshal Pilsudski by one of Poland's finest actors, Daniel Olbrychski. To be fair, though, the mawkish screenplay provided little in the way of theatrical nourishment for this film's characters.

Apparently, this is Poland's first foray into 3-D, but I bought the 2-D dvd, and thought that, in general, the video quality was very good. It is also worth mentioning, though, that the musical score, so important to a movie of such grand pretensions, was a lackluster rehash from the director's "Deluge" trilogy, and could have used a fresher slant from a John Williams or Zbigniew Preisner. .

At the end of the day, if you're evenly remotely interested in the significance of this great historical conflict between Poland and the young Soviet empire (led by Lenin, Trotsky, Stalin, et al), you'd be much better served by reading Adam Zamoyski's short book, "Warsaw 1920," or "White Eagle Red Star" by Norman Davies. You're sure not going to gain much insight or depth through this plot-challenged, battle-heavy, movie hodgepodge. [There is also an interesting book, "Kosciuszko, We Are Here: American Pilots of the Kosciuszko Squadron in Defense of Poland, 1919-1921" by Janusz Cisek, which adds a valuable perspective to this combat].

TECHNICAL POINT: Although the product details indicate that this dvd is PAL (Region 2), the disc that I received from Poland plays on my regular dvd player. I have a region-free OPPO which plays both PAL and NTSC dvds, but when I first got "Bitwa ..." in the mail, I accidentally put it into my non-region-free Pioneer dvd player and ultimately discovered that it plays fine in both players. [The product details on the back of the Polish disc jacket indicate that this is a DVD 9, and I've read that copy production flags or region codes can't ordinarily be encrypted onto these kinds of discs. Consequently, they play in all regions].
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Jerzy Hoffman brings one of the world's most decisive battles to film April 23 2012
By Richard J. Brzostek - Published on Amazon.com
Polish director Jerzy Hoffman brings one of the world's most decisive battles to film in 1920 Bitwa Warszawska (The Battle of Warsaw). This 2011 film has special effects galore and happens to be the first Polish movie made in 3D. It evokes feelings of a historic epic and is teeming with the best Polish actors (and even a few Russian actors too).

Poland just resurfaced on the map in 1918 after 123 years of being wiped off the map by her neighbors, but trouble is never too far away. Thankfully, Poland has strong leaders like Jozef Pilsudski (Daniel Olbrychski), Jozef Haller (Jacek Poniedzialek) and Boleslaw Wieniawa-Dlugoszowski (Boguslaw Linda) that are able to defend her from the Soviet invaders that would like to see socialism across all of Europe. There only stands one thing in the way from spreading socialism across the world: Poland.

1920 Bitwa Warszawska tries to balance spoon-feeding us historical details that give the story context with the personal side of the war by showing us how the war affected the lives of a newlywed couple. Jan Krynicki (Borys Szyc) marries her girl Ola Raniewska (Natasza Urbanska) just before he is sent out to war. While the frame of the story is a romance, it doesn't develop this part of the story too greatly as there is so much other things that need to be shown. The film takes on a lot in a short amount of time, so it could have easily been at least an hour longer to develop the details in greater depth, but then some would complain the film is too long.

Jan is seemingly sympathetic to socialistic ideas, which gets him in trouble with his fellow soldiers, but ends up saving his life as well. Jan is cured of his sympathy when he sees firsthand the doubletalk and absurdity that come with socialism, convincing him that he must do everything to stop the Soviets. We see both many forms of Soviet propaganda pushing socialism and Polish patriotism that attempts to stir every emotion among its people to stand up to the coming tide of Russian assault.

Although there are many Poles apathetic to what is happening, as they would rather not mix with politics knowing that things can change too quickly and being on the wrong side means death, many do all they can to help with the ongoing war. While Ola worries for her husband's safety, she decides to help by joining the army and gives her heart and soul into defending Poland.

Blood and guts are not spared in the least, so war is by no means some glorious parade of brave men in uniform, but rather a chaotic hell in which one can loose one's life or limb at any moment. While there are many skirmishes and clashes of forces throughout the film, it really all leads up to the big fight at the end. The battle doesn't look miraculous save for its outcome, as it really is just a slaughter, with both sides having its people massacred.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Warsaw - 1920 Oct. 5 2012
By Paul Brinsden - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
I teach a classes for mature students at our local college about less known but significant military engagements in history. The Battle of warsaw 1920 certainly falls into that category. When I found that a movie had recently been made on this very topic I was delighted. The movie is excellent and picks up many of the elements of the episode although one should have studied other written history materials to recognize them. The "commentary" approach via a cabaret vehicle is interestingly done and many of the important comments are made in those segments. Given the history of Poland since 1920 through WW II, Katyn and Communist Block it is not surprising that this movie has been long in coming. Combat detail is not spared so be aware! Movie was supplied direct from Poland in "all region" format. Title is "1920 Bitwa Warszawska" and is subtitled well in English.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Cud nad Wisla through post-Communist eyes July 27 2013
By pareto - Published on Amazon.com
The only war the Soviets lost was that against the Poles in 1920. It was a very big deal. In particular, the American aviators kept the Budyenny Army of the South
sufficiently harassed that they failed to join with Tukhashevsky's Army of the North. These were led by M.C. Cooper from Jacksonville Florida, who created the Polish
Airforce. Later Cooper wrote, produced and directed King Kong.He was the producer of the Ford classics such as The Searchers.

This movie is watered down to conceal the big differences between the Catholic Poles and the Red Army. The leading actress is portrayed as a former cabaret singer.
Much of the time in the movie is spent deflecting away from the serious life and death struggle faced by the Poles. As a former Party member married to a Soviet wife, Hoffman
was probably a poor choice for directing the film. However, I would recommend this film, since Hoffman is an excellent cinematographer. There is a 30 minute core of the film
which should have been fleshed out to replace irrelevant Liza Minelli like cabaret scenes. This War was a very big deal. The present post-communist government of Poland
does not like dwelling on such events. Most of the junior league of the old communists of the former satellites are now in power (with the exception of Hungary) and they don't like to be reminded of their training days with the Soviets. "Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose."

I was in Poland when "The March of the First Brigade" was played on the carillon of the Sejm after Freedom came. A moment for moist eyes. The old Soviet ways linger on, and people are suffering from a government that does not understand the concept of a Free Market. But things are better under the post-communists than they were under the real ones. That a film could have been made about the Miracle on the Vistula is a sign of progress and hope. This movie may be playable on some American dvd players, e.g., Apex. The essential patriotic core of 30 minutes may be viewed on YouTube.

The best is the enemy of the good. If this film were available in American dvd format, I would definitely buy it.
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Look for similar items by category


Feedback