Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.

CDN$ 230.89 + CDN$ 3.49 shipping
In Stock. Sold by thebookcommunity_ca

or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here

1950-1958 Josef Krips Histor [Box set]

J-Vari Various/Krips Audio CD
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
Price: CDN$ 230.89
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 1 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by thebookcommunity_ca.

Product Details


Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant Recordings Rescued From The Vaults June 9 2003
Format:Audio CD
Now that Decca and Deutsche Grammophon, among others, are all part of Universal, we have seen some interesting things happen, and not all of them bad. What I'm referring to in this case is the new "Original Masters" Limited Edition Box Set series. Finally, the classical music world has taken a page out of the jazz reissue handbook -- put out a quality product featuring rare recordings but make its availability limited, and people will snatch it up. In the "Original Masters" series, first DG and now Decca have each reissued five boxed sets, of 4 to 7 CDs each, in distinguished, space-saving slim paper boxes, though the style of packaging is different. The DG sets feature 50s style graphics design on their covers, while the Decca ones have a distinctive rainbow/spectrum pattern on the spines and banners, and a black-and-white photo of the artist in question on the face of the box.
This particular set features the great conductor Josef Krips' Decca recordings from 1950-58. As the track information is non-existent above, I will try to be of assistance. The first disc contains Mozart's Symphonies Nos. 39 and 40 (the back of the box indicating it as Symphony No. 4 is a typo) with the London Symphony Orchestra (LSO) from 1951 and 1953 respectively, and the 41st Symphony with the Israel Philharmonic from 1957. Disc two features Brahms' Symphony No. 4 (LSO, 1950) and the Dvorak Cello Concerto with Zara Nelsova (LSO, 1951). Disc three returns to Mozart with the 31st Symphony (LSO, 1951), then winds up with the Schubert "Unfinished" (LSO, 1950) and Schumann's 4th Symphony (LSO, 1952). CD Four begins by showcasing the vocal talents of soprano Inge Borkh on Beethoven's "Ah!
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars  2 reviews
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant Recordings Rescued From The Vaults June 9 2003
By Michael B. Richman - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Now that Decca and Deutsche Grammophon, among others, are all part of Universal, we have seen some interesting things happen, and not all of them bad. What I'm referring to in this case is the new "Original Masters" Limited Edition Box Set series. Finally, the classical music world has taken a page out of the jazz reissue handbook -- put out a quality product featuring rare recordings but make its availability limited, and people will snatch it up. In the "Original Masters" series, first DG and now Decca have each reissued five box sets, of 4 to 7 CDs each, in distinguished, space-saving slim paper boxes, though the style of packaging is different. The DG sets feature 50s style graphics design on their covers, while the Decca ones have a distinctive rainbow/spectrum pattern on the spines and banners, and a black-and-white photo of the artist in question on the face of the box.

This particular set features the great conductor Josef Krips' Decca recordings from 1950-58. As the track information is non-existent above, I will try to be of assistance. The first disc contains Mozart's Symphonies Nos. 39 and 40 (the back of the box indicating it as Symphony No. 4 is a typo) with the London Symphony Orchestra (LSO) from 1951 and 1953 respectively, and the 41st Symphony with the Israel Philharmonic from 1957. Disc two features Brahms' Symphony No. 4 (LSO, 1950) and the Dvorak Cello Concerto with Zara Nelsova (LSO, 1951). Disc three returns to Mozart with the 31st Symphony (LSO, 1951), then winds up with the Schubert "Unfinished" (LSO, 1950) and Schumann's 4th Symphony (LSO, 1952). CD Four begins by showcasing the vocal talents of soprano Inge Borkh on Beethoven's "Ah! Perfido" and the closing scene from Strauss' Salome (both Vienna Philharmonic, 1956), then concludes with Tchaikovsky's 5th Symphony (Vienna, 1958). The final disc starts with two Haydn Symphonies -- Nos. 94 & 99 both with the Vienna Philharmonic from 1957 -- and concludes back in London with Mendelssohn's 4th Symphony (LSO, 1953). Despite the fact that the majority of these recordings are in mono (the Mozart 41st from CD 1, all of CD 4, and Haydn 94th and 99th from CD 5 are the only stereo tracks), the first rate performances more than compensate for any audio shortcomings. Well, I guess the consolidation of the music industry isn't so bad after all, as long as I can look forward to more reissues like this.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Viennese good ol' boy at his respectable best March 17 2007
By Santa Fe Listener - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Josef Krips was one of those comfortable old slippers knocking around Vienna forever; he made dozens of records, many of them in the fifties, and although one reads critical praise for his Schubert, he never quite made the definitive recording of anything. It's indisputable that he was steeped in the echt Viennese style, and now that it has passed away, his recordings assume a secondary value aside from whether they are inspired or not.

Having let Krips slip form my mind decades ago, I welcomed a chance to revisit some of his output, most of it mono and well recorded by Decca, then a leader in the audio field.

CD 1: Although the Mozart Sym. 39 and 40 were made with the LSO, they sound viennese in their lyrical relaxation and naturalness. The first movement of the 39th will make you think Krips must be a maestro to contend with--it's absolutely wonderful, albeit old-fashioned (to me that's not a detraction). The Minuet is measured but doesn't lumber; the finale doesn't streak like lightning a la George Szell but is satisfying in its moderation. Close-up, clear mono gives way to more distant and brittle sound in the 40th, but the reading is comparable. So is the fine "Jupiter" Sym. with the Israel Phil. in serviceable stereo, but here the orchestra's lack of polish is rather telling.

CD 2: We stay with the LSO in early Fifties mono for the Brahms Fourth Symn. and the Dvorak Cello Concerto with Zara Nelsova (a great cellist also honored with her own Original Masters box set on Decca). Krips is often damned with the faiant praise of bieng "solid," and that's true of the Brahms. Everything goes well, but there's no special intensity or individuality. The telltale movement in this work is the tragic finale, and here Krips shows skill but lacks involvement. Decca's sonics are a bit buzzy in the woodwinds. The tape source for the Dvorak sounds worn to me, with crackle and hiss on the surface, although not to a damaging degree. Again Krips is solid (a bit stolid, actually), and his measured pacing seems to prevent nelsova from taking flight. Even so, her playing is a pleasure because she brings modesty and individualaity to her phrasing--there's no attempt to turn the recessive cello into a poerhouse.

CD 3: For a Viennese, Krips is spending a lot of time in London--we remain there for this whole CD, and just like almost everything else so far, the recording dates are between 1950-52. The Mozart "Paris" Sym. 31 has the identical distant sound as the Sym. 40; it's quite enjoyable in the same sensible vein as the previous Mozart readings. Don't expect the skyrocket runs in the first movement to create thrills and spills. We get another worn source for the Schubert "Unfinished" (they must have had to blow an inch of dust off them--Krips has never been reissued much). ONe can hear in this moderate but idiomatic performance why Krips' was esteemed in Schubert--he's genuinely tender and affecting here. With an easy glide we move into the Schumann Fourth, with no change in sonics and another skillful, moderate rendition. Actually, Krips adopts the same pacing as Furtwangler in his famous recording from about the same time for DG. It's fascinating to compare their styles, although Krips comes off the workman rather than the master.

CD 4: At last we arrive in Vienna and the recording dates move toward the mid-Fifties up to 1958. Soprano Inge borkh, probably the leading Straussian of her day, at least in heavier roles like Elektra and Salome, made a famous recording of the last scene from Salome on rCA with Reiner and the Chicago Sym. Here she duplicates that with the Vienna Phil., and again she's strikingly exciting. It's a shame the sosnics are mono since the orchestra is playing with exceptional vibrancy. Stereo crops up for a Tchaikovsky fifth from 1958, making it one of the latest recordings in this box set. The playing of the Vienna Phil. is cushy and plush (they accepted Krips as one of the original old boys), and the pacing is comfortable rather than dramatic. For me, however, the gorgeous playing and unusually fine sound make for one of the best things here. Just don't look for fireworks or Russian angst.

CD 5: We remain in Vienna for two Haydn symphonies in Stereo, No. 94 ("Surprise") and 99. These are genial, smiling readings on the order of Bruno Walter but without that extra snap and alertness. I like them veyr much for their charm, and Decca's sound is close up, clear, and natural. You can hear the VPO play Haydn in exactly the same way today; they keep his flame burning as no other orchestra does. Finally, back to London in 1953 for a Mendelssohn "Italian" Sym. that cana't help but be a letdown. It's strictly middle of the road without any added zest.

In all, I'd say that only the two Haydn symphonies and the Schubert "Unfinished" seemed completely first rate, but everything in the set was at least enjoyable. I was reminded that Krips was solid, as his reputation went, but that counted for more than I had remembered.
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Look for similar items by category


Feedback