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2000 Inside Out Live Live


Price: CDN$ 16.94 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
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26 new from CDN$ 11.42 5 used from CDN$ 11.44

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Oct. 9 2001)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Live
  • Label: Universal Music Group
  • ASIN: B00005ND35
  • Other Editions: Audio CD
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #81,212 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. From The Body
2. Inside Out
3. 341 Free Fade
4. Riot
5. When I Fall In Love

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

By A Customer on Feb. 5 2004
Format: Audio CD
It's probably the shock that comes from high expectations around Jarrett and this trio. Another reviewer, and non-musician, pointed out that musicians often find this improv fascinating. But if you're less "sophisticated" musically and a fan of Tokyo '96,Live at Blue Note, Still Live or any of Jarrett's solo work, you better find one of those music stores where you can scan the barcode and listen first.
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By Lord Chimp on Dec 19 2003
Format: Audio CD
This is a damn good piano trio album. While not as "out there" as some of the free jazz you may find, the Keith Jarrett trio captures both accessibility and some very profound free moments.
This album is essential if only for the first and third tracks, where the improvisation carries the musicians into some downright profound sonic bliss. The first song, "From the Body" is a definite high point. In the beginning of its 21 minutes, Keith Jarrett plays a simple, catchy, odd-timed modal melody. The others join, immediately cohering their minds to create an open, extra-sensory means of communication. Quite simply, it's uncanny how well they play together, their collegiality informing every note they play. For nearly 12-minutes they carry on without a dull moment, but it only gets better. Towards the end it shifts into a subdued, high speed shimmering pointillist whirl and it's spine-tinglingly energetic. It swells to Keith Jarrett bringing down a majestic piano performance of classical power.
Then there is "341 Free Fade", my other favorite piece on the album. It opens with Peacock's heavy solo, then the others join him and they weave through a telepathically flowing jazz improv. It gradually shifts into more abstract territory, finally becoming an avant-sounding clatter that carries on for eight minutes or so, decidedly unjazzy -- un*anything* -- with DeJohnette's drums clacking, Jarrett's atonal piano plinking in odd time signatures, and Peacock's bass erratically thumping and buzzing.
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By FePe on Nov. 4 2003
Format: Audio CD
Some music can be played as both background music and "foreground music". Most modern music is in this category. Other types of music is only suitable as foreground music, i.e music that demands an active listener.
"Inside Out" is of this type. Keith Jarrett, Gary Peacock, and Jack DeJohnette it at it again, producing gorgeous music. The trio has played standards in many years in a free way. On this album they have gone one step further to so-called "free" playing. Each of them has experimented with it in the 60s, so it's not a new experience for them.
The first tune on the album, "From The Body", begins with Jarrett playing a theme-like introduction, the others then follow. The next tune, "Inside Out", is blues-inspired, at least after a while. The songs don't follow a strict scheme in any way, it's up to each of them to form the music as he likes while of course paying atttention to the overall direction and flow. Most often it's Jarrett who begins with new ideas. But the other two has as much to say as him. The album ends with a standard, as if to say, "we still can play standards!" It's to beutifully played that it leaves the listener wanting more.
This popular trio has went a new way, making some listeners displeased, others pleased. If you like free music or this trio and are open to different types of music, you will like this album. But some concentration and active listening is required to appreciate the music. If this type of music is new to you, pour yourself a cup of coffee, sit down and relax and concentrate. Then let the music speak.
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By aaron on Jan. 16 2003
Format: Audio CD
However, I have never understood people's problems with Jarrett' vocals. He comes from a long tradition of humming to his playing: Powell did it, Monk did it, Hancock does it. I always get into this album and his singing just thrusts my interest into it that much more. It seems more urgent with his singing. That's my take on it though.
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Format: Audio CD
Keith Jarrett's music is (usually) a gift to the world. Is there anyone else whose head and fingers seem as directly sourced to the essence of what music is and why humans like it? Two of my favorite pieces of recorded music are by Jarrett: Live at the Blue Note box set, and Shostakovich's Preludes & Fugues Op. 87 -- both simply ethereal works. But Inside Out is, well, awful. No discernable melodies. Unpleasant dissonance reigns. You know, Pat Metheny -- who I similarly think is as close to the muse as Jarrett -- does this stuff occasionally too. Maybe it's me. I'm not an accomplished musician. Accomplished musicians seems to rave about each other when they do this atonal stuff. To me, it's annoying noise. What a disappointment.
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Format: Audio CD
This is not the first time that the Standards Trio has stretched itself outside of it's traditional niche of lovingly interpreted jazz classic. But when working with musicians of this high caliber it seems natural that they don't always needs an overt structure. This has been proven before on the Changless album and on one of the cuts on Bye Bye Blackbird. But this album is probably a bit more adventurous than the other free form outings, and also maybe a bit less successful. Jarrett, Peacock and DeJohnette have an almost preternatural ability to anticipate, compliment and counterpoint each other...creating and almost chamber music like intensity. But some of these cuts begin to wander after a while. You tend to wish for a bit more concision in the playing. And while Jarrett is characteristicly ecstatic, he doesn't reach the heights of his best solo performances such as Vienna or La Scala.
It's still a good album, don't get me wrong. It's just not my favorite work by this incredible supergroup.
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