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  • 2001: A Space Odyssey: Special Edition  [Blu-ray] (Bilingual)
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2001: A Space Odyssey: Special Edition [Blu-ray] (Bilingual)


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2001: A Space Odyssey: Special Edition  [Blu-ray] (Bilingual) + 2010: Year We Make Contact [Blu-ray] (Bilingual) + Blade Runner Final Cut [Blu-ray] (Bilingual)
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Product Details

  • Actors: Keir Dullea, Richter Daniel, Rain Douglas voice Of Hal, Lockwood Gary, Sylvester William
  • Directors: Stanley Kubrick
  • Format: NTSC, Subtitled
  • Language: English, French
  • Region: Region A/1
  • Aspect Ratio: Unknown
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Canadian Home Video Rating : Parental Guidance (PG)
  • Studio: Warner Bros. Home Video
  • Release Date: Jan. 29 2008
  • Run Time: 149 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (317 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000W00XU0
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #848 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

Product Description

2001: A Space Odyssey: Special Edition (BIL)

Amazon.ca

When Stanley Kubrick recruited Arthur C. Clarke to collaborate on "the proverbial intelligent science fiction film," it's a safe bet neither the maverick auteur nor the great science fiction writer knew they would virtually redefine the parameters of the cinema experience. A daring experiment in unconventional narrative inspired by Clarke's short story "The Sentinel," 2001 is a visual tone poem (barely 40 minutes of dialogue in a 139-minute film) that charts a phenomenal history of human evolution. From the dawn-of-man discovery of crude but deadly tools in the film's opening sequence to the journey of the spaceship Discovery and metaphysical birth of the "star child" at film's end, Kubrick's vision is meticulous and precise. In keeping with the director's underlying theme of dehumanization by technology, the notorious, seemingly omniscient computer HAL 9000 has more warmth and personality than the human astronauts it supposedly is serving. (The director also leaves the meaning of the black, rectangular alien monoliths open for discussion.) This theme, in part, is what makes 2001 a film like no other, though dated now that its postmillennial space exploration has proven optimistic compared to reality. Still, the film is timelessly provocative in its pioneering exploration of inner- and outer-space consciousness. With spectacular, painstakingly authentic special effects that have stood the test of time, Kubrick's film is nothing less than a cinematic milestone--puzzling, provocative, and perfect. --Jeff Shannon

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By LeBrain HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on Feb. 15 2011
Format: Blu-ray
Once upon a time, when the year 2001 seemed aeons away, director Stanley Kubruck (Dr. Strangelove) contacted author Arthur C. Clarke (Childhood's End) to discuss making "the proverbial good science fiction movie". Both were sick of films that passed for science fiction, but were actually monster movies set in space, or were fiction films with the science replaced by fantasy.

The result was 2001: A Space Odyssey, the film, and a companion book of the same name which is actually a completely different animal. The film -- striking, innovative, visually engrossing, ambiguous, and scientifically solid -- is as good today as it was in 1968, even if many of the "predictions" of the film have failed to come to pass. (Perhaps if the shuttle didn't explode in '86, we'd be closer to having moon bases today?)

Separated into four chapters (The Dawn Of Man, TMA-1, Jupiter Mission (and an intermission with music), and finally Jupiter and Beyond the Infinite), 2001 has no dialogue at all for the entire first quarter of the film. Beginning with a blank screen and "Atmospheres" by Ligeti, this is a film paradoxically anchored by both music and silence. The screen changes to the Earth rising over the moon, and the sun rising over the Earth (an important clue and recurring symbol) accompanied by "Thus Spoke Zarathustra". We are then introduced to a tribe of pre-human apes (Australopithecus, perhaps), starving and on the verge of extinction. Other tribes are stronger and out-competing them. There is no dialogue here but the barking of the apes, yet that and the scenery speak volumes. Suddenly one morning, the game has changed: A mysterious black monolith has appeared. The apes are drawn to it, and soon find that they are now able to compete with predators thanks to a new discovery: weapons.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By LeBrain HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on Dec 23 2009
Format: DVD
Once upon a time, when the year 2001 seemed aeons away, director Stanley Kubruck (Dr. Strangelove) contacted author Arthur C. Clarke (Childhood's End) to discuss making "the proverbial good science fiction movie". Both were sick of films that passed for science fiction, but were actually monster movies set in space, or were fiction films with the science replaced by fantasy.

The result was 2001: A Space Odyssey, the film, and a companion book of the same name which is actually a completely different animal. The film -- striking, innovative, visually engrossing, ambiguous, and scientifically solid -- is as good today as it was in 1968, even if many of the "predictions" of the film have failed to come to pass. (Perhaps if the shuttle didn't explode in '86, we'd be closer to having moon bases today?)

Separated into four chapters (The Dawn Of Man, TMA-1, Jupiter Mission (and an intermission with music), and finally Jupiter and Beyond the Infinite), 2001 has no dialogue at all for the entire first quarter of the film. Beginning with a blank screen and "Atmospheres" by Ligeti, this is a film paradoxically anchored by both music and silence. The screen changes to the Earth rising over the moon, and the sun rising over the Earth (an important clue and recurring symbol) accompanied by "Thus Spoke Zarathustra". We are then introduced to a tribe of pre-human apes (Australopithecus, perhaps), starving and on the verge of extinction. Other tribes are stronger and out-competing them. There is no dialogue here but the barking of the apes, yet that and the scenery speak volumes. Suddenly one morning, the game has changed: A mysterious black monolith has appeared.
Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jimbo Jones on June 10 2012
Format: DVD
The first time I watched this movie, I was a little bit tired and I fell asleep 20 minutes in, concluding that it was the most boring movie I had ever seen. A few years later, in a more energetic state, I decided to give it a try, this time lowering my expectations and bracing myself for the slow pace. This time, I still found the slow pace bothersome, but I found that the movie was so wonderful in every other aspect that I could look past some of the (excrusiatingly) long sequences and enjoy the masterful visuals, music, tension, and mystery that Kubrick assembled. Honestly, this might be the most beautiful film ever made. Every shot looks like it could be an award-winning photograph. Technically, it appears superior to many current films. The movie's ending is highly perplexing, but it didn't bother me too much since it is obviously meant to be pondered by the audience. Overall, it's easy to see why this is considered one of the greatest films ever made and I consider it my favourite of Kubrick's. The only problem I have with it (I say this at the risk of receiving some negative reviews) is the pacing in parts. I feel that 20 minutes or more could be easily shaved off if some of the sequences were shortened slightly. For example, there are numerous times in the movie where we watch a person or object float slowly in space for minutes at a time. While I can appreciate the devotion to realism, I'm still tempted to press the 1.3x feature on my remote for such parts. But overall this is a fantastic work of science fiction and shouldn't be passed by simply because it is slow.
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