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2010 Import


Price: CDN$ 98.95
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3 new from CDN$ 98.95 1 used from CDN$ 91.19

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Amazon.com: 3 reviews
14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
Great Score To An Underrated Movie Aug. 10 2003
By Erik North - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Released at the end of 1984, "2010" is a terribly underrated follow-up to Stanley Kubrick's 1968 sci-fi masterpiece 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY. Everything about this film says that it is in bad need of reassessing.
And that goes for the music score as well. Beginning with Police lead guitarist Andy Summers' version of Richard Strauss' "Also Sprach Zarathustra", this recording then moves on to the eerie, synthesizer-dominated music score composed by David Shire, who also worked on films like THE TAKING OF PELHAM ONE-TWO-THREE and parts of SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER. If this original score doesn't necessarily bear comparison to the uses of classical music applied by Kubrick in his landmark movie, it nevertheless shows that Shire is one of our most underrated film score composers. His "New Worlds" and "Nova" cues are some of the most inventive uses of synthesizers put into a movie's music soundtrack since A CLOCKWORK ORANGE
This combination of orchestral, electronic, and synthesizer motifs would not be matched in a film score until John Williams did it for A.I.: ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE in (ironically enough!) 2001. Therefore, the "2010" soundtrack is well worth seeking out!
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Almost Entirely Good Jan. 28 2010
By Rebecca L. Prasuhn - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Very spooky and atmospheric electronic score to a criminally underlooked film. Hearing it outside of the movie reveals a lot of detail in the compositions that are drowned out by dialogue mixing and sound effects; the Earth/Space track had a lot more layers than you heard during the film. The tense reality of the hostilities back on Earth, and the increasingly dangerous mission to reactivate the Discovery and leave Jupiter orbit before 'something wonderful' happens, are impressively supported by the music. There is a good deal of organic emotion and drama going on, and the music is calibrated to parallel and enhance both. Props to David Shire for making it well balanced too; its never too minimalistic to be emotional, or too cluttered to be coherent. The orchestral ending is a very nice touch, sending things off in a triumphant burst. Shire is as talented with traditional scoring as he is with the electronic variety, and its welcome to hear the now familiar themes backed by a big studio orchestra.

There was a great piece of music at the opening of 2010, while they show us the text/picture montage about the fate of USS Discovery via a main character's report...it's mysterious at first, builds to an intense pulsating crescendo as the report ends, and turns into the Also Sprach Zarathustra theme for the credits. It's tense and dramatic, a good hook for the audience...it is also nowhere to be found on the CD! I'm taking a star off the rating for two reasons. First, the CD itself runs about 36 minutes. Even in the 80's, CDs could handle more than that, so the omission of a 2-3 minute track is mystifying (and its digital music. It didn't need to be digitized again to release. It would have cost nothing). Not only could the track have easily fit onto the CD, the song that does start the CD is just not very good. This is the second reason. The CD opens with a chincy-sounding, synth-pop version of Also Sprach Zarathustra courtesy of Andy Summers. It isn't in the movie, and aside from using a familiar theme, is otherwise unrelated to anything. I can see re-interpreting Zarathustra, no problem, it's just that this version is not distinctive or even interesting, and inappropriate for the album because it's at the expense of perfectly good soundtrack material. I'll admit, it's kinda fun to listen to, but c'mon...you can open the CD with a cheap Zarathustra riff by a former member of The Police, or with the intense stuff Daivd Shire wrote that is actually in the movie... this decision was apparently a LOT harder than it should have been, and I guess it never crossed their minds to include both.

Still, I can only take one star off. The rest of the CD is great and as complete as nessesary. It's just missing one track it should really have, and includes one it really shouldn't. Small complaint. Great Score. Buy it if yer so inclined! But hurry, as things stand its been OOP for some time now, is hard to track down, and will only get more expensive :)
An underestimated soundtrack... Nov. 18 2012
By RDL - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I first came across this soundtrack years ago, had it in vinyl... Long story short, I lost it and wanted it back - badly. My expectations were fulfilled, this record is excellent and came to my mail box in excellent condition. The only problem was with the case, which was and still is a bit hard to open; regardless, I would buy from this seller again.

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