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34th Rule Audio Cassette


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Product Details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671033581
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671033583
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 10.7 x 1.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 113 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (35 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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By Haseeb on Oct. 4 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book would make an excellent espionage/thriller. In many ways, the plot reminds me of something Frederick Forsyth would write. Perhaps the authors may have read some books by him. The twists and surprising revelations at the end of this novel would satisfy any fan of intrigue and espionage. I honesty had no idea what was going to happen from chapter to chapter.
A highly valued religious artifact (the 9th orb of the prophets) which originated on the planet Bajor gets into the hands of the head of the Faringi Alliance (grand Negus Zek). Bajor then asks for it back since it belongs to them and Negus purchased it on the black market. Negus then places the item in an auction. Unsatisfied with the amount Bejor would be willing to pay for the orb, Negus bars them from the auction. This angers the head of Bejor (Shakaar) and causes friction between Faringis and Bejorans. The Bejorans and Faringis then start to trade blows with one another. Relations between the Faringi and Bejorans get worse and it affects Quark's relations with Kira as well as with others on DS9.
Quark plays a significant role in this story because he knows Negus Zek very well. Rom, Quark's brother also plays a significant part. In watching DS9, I remember Rom as a very simple-minded Faringi but this story shows a different side of him. Rom's character in this book is very consistent with the way I remember him on the TV show, but he is portrayed as a very courageous individual who has intelligent things to say. Also, this is the first time I've witnessed anger from Rom.
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By Haseeb5 on Oct. 4 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book would make an excellent espionage/thriller. In many ways, the plot reminds me of something Frederick Forsyth would write. Perhaps the authors may have read some books by him. The twists and surprising revelations at the end of this novel would satisfy any fan of intrigue and espionage. I honesty had no idea what was going to happen from chapter to chapter.
A highly valued religious artifact (the 9th orb of the prophets) which originated on the planet Bajor gets into the hands of the head of the Faringi Alliance (grand Negus Zek). Bajor then asks for it back since it belongs to them and Negus purchased it on the black market. Negus then places the item in an auction. Unsatisfied with the amount Bejor would be willing to pay for the orb, Negus bars them from the auction. This angers the head of Bejor (Shakaar) and causes friction between Faringis and Bejorans. The Bejorans and Faringis then start to trade blows with one another. Relations between the Faringi and Bejorans get worse and it affects Quark's relations with Kira as well as with others on DS9.
Quark plays a significant role in this story because he knows Negus Zek very well. Rom, Quark's brother also plays a significant part. In watching DS9, I remember Rom as a very simple-minded Faringi but this story shows a different side of him. Rom's character in this book is very consistent with the way I remember him on the TV show, but he is portrayed as a very courageous individual who has intelligent things to say. Also, this is the first time I've witnessed anger from Rom.
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Format: Audio Cassette
A religious artifact of deep significance to the Bajorans is acquired by the Ferengi Grand Nagus and he puts it up for auction. When the Bajorans do not survive the first round bidding, they try to force the issue of obtaining it by expelling all Ferengi from Bajoran space. Conditions rapidly deteriorate until there is a declaration of war between the Ferengi and the Bajorans. Quark and Rom are caught up in the machinations and sent to a prison camp on Bajor, where they are tortured. The Federation is involved, where they use all of their influence to avoid a catastrophe. This story is one of the more original of the DSN series, revealing some aspects of the Ferengi and Bajoran cultures and how much they differ.
Shimerman was much better at dramatic reading than I expected. I associate his voice with the Ferengi, so I had initial doubts as to the quality of his reading in the roles of people such as the Federation officers and Bajoran government officials. His changes of tone and cadence are quite good, adding a great deal to the dramatic effect of the story. I enjoyed the tape and recommend it to all Star Trek fans.
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By Nathan on April 22 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I've said it before and I'll say it again...in terms of Trek books, I'm glad DS9 has ended. That show had so much more depth and potential for interesting stories than the other Trek incarnations, and now that it's over, authors are daring to do something relatively new in the overcrowded, formulaic Trek series -- come up with a plot.
Until now, just about every book is, so and so on the Enterprise must solve/find this before the galaxy is destroyed. Not only is it episodic and boring, but it's repetitive. 34th rule gives us a welcome break. Spanning not the typical couple of days, but a full 2-3 months, this book gives us the absolute best character development we've seen yet in a book, and brings in racism and the Ferengi like we've never seen them before.
There is some genuine suspense, and a very interesting, if convoluted, little war. And don't skip this book thinking it's going to be a farce like the "Ferengi episodes" in the show. It's not, in fact, Quark is barely in the second part.
There's also a running joke throughout the book where Ferengi that Armin has previously portrayed in TNG show up. The only negative point in this book is that the whole Colonal Mitra thing is never really cleared up. Other than that it's fantastic. Read it.
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