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A Bridge Too Far [Blu-ray]


Price: CDN$ 7.08
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Frequently Bought Together

A Bridge Too Far [Blu-ray] + Battle of Britain [Blu-ray] + The Longest Day / Patton / The Sand Pebbles / Tora! Tora! Tora! [Blu-ray]
Price For All Three: CDN$ 57.04

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Product Details

  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: French, Spanish
  • Dubbed: French, Spanish
  • Region: Region A/1
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: PG
  • Studio: MGM
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (135 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000WC39SG
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #42,425 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

An epic film that "re-creates in stunning detail one of the most disastrous battles of World War II" (The Hollywood Reporter), A Bridge Too Far is a spectacular war picture. Painstakingly recreated on actual battlefield locations and boasting a remarkable cast that includes Sean Connery, Anthony Hopkins, Sir Laurence Olivier and Robert Redford, A Bridge Too Far accurately recaptures the monumental scope, excitement and danger behind one of the biggest military gambles in history. In September 1944, flush with success after the Normandy Invasion, the Allies confidently launched Operation Market Garden, a wild scheme intended to put an early end to the fighting by invading Germany and smashing the Reich's war plants. But a combination of battlefield politics, faulty intelligence, bad luck and even worse weather led to disaster beyond the Allies' darkest fears.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By FrKurt Messick HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on May 27 2004
Format: DVD
- History -
Operation Market-Garden, begun in September 1944, was an Allied military campaign led by Montgomery, the senior British field commander, in the latter stages of World War II. While the Allies were still in France, a plan had to be formulated for making the major push into German territory, a difficult task, considering the Rhine River (one of the major rivers of the world) provided a natural defensive border with the majority of the German homeland. Planning offensive operations required taking this into account, and how the forces would cross the river and remain safe while doing so, rather than have bottlenecks that would make the forces easy targets.
While Patton was in the south, pushing through France on the backside of the old Maginot line, Montgomery hit upon an idea to seize a series of bridges across the various rivers that made up the geography of the Low Countries, all the way up to Arnhem, one of the northern-most major bridges across the Rhine, a bridge outside of German territory, but a good jumping-off point for invading northern Germany. His plan won approval, and in one of the largest military operations of the war, a major push was developed to secure the bridges. This had the largest airborne component of any battle in the war, as troops were airlifted and dropped into position around each bridge, charged to hold the bridges until ground forces pushed northward linking up logistic and defensive lines toward each spot.
Operation Market-Garden was actually two operations -Market was the airborne component; Garden was the ground component. It was meant to take the Germans by surprise (which it did) and exploit their disorganisation (which was, sadly for the Allies, not as severe as intelligence predicted).
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Stuart Winer on June 12 2004
Format: DVD
I liked this film very much. It's not overly patriotic like Saving Private Ryan. It doesn't go for the happy, crowd pleasing ending. It doesn't pick out heros & bad guys for easy watching and it doesn't oversimplify.
This is well-paced, collage-style film about human fallibility and what happens when large wartime operations break down.
The dialogue is superb. There are 10+ characters interlocked in various relationships at all levels inside the army. These were the top actors in the world at the time, each with a role to play and an independent fate in the battle. All these guys are in their 60's now and seeing them so young is a surprise. Look for John Ratzenberger (Cliff Claven of Cheers) in Robert Redford's paratrooper platoon.
The production values were also excellent, on par with the best of WWII movies. There were many very realistic battle scenes and all the scenery and soldiers, equipment, etc. one could imagine. To the untrained eye it was 100% authentic.
This is not a happy movie or much fun. It's more real than that. Unfortunately it's also not especially harrowing - you know that things are not going to work out. It's just thoughtful and well-paced and very watcheable. If you like WWII movies this one is certainly worthwhile.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By classicmoviefan on May 10 2004
Format: DVD
This is a terrific film in many ways. It is not entirely accurate in places (Redford crosses the river bravely, not the British)... it also suffers from an overblown and, at times, tedius repetitive "military march" music score that seems inappropriate for the scenes now and again..... HOWEVER.... it is truly entertaining, moving, and it is accurate enough to show how truly tragic war can be. The acting is first rate, especially the British actors, the Americans also turn in some fine parformances, particularly Gene Hackman.... the only weak performance is by Ryan O'Neil, who looks terrific, but seems too young for the part he plays and tends to walk through his part with one blank and static expression.
I did enjoy this film though, great action shots, superior sets, props, costumes, and gorgeous photography. Overall the film is a moving tribute to some very brave and heroic men in a fierce battle... and the battle scenes are amazing and vivid.
The look of my DVD is VERY GOOD. The print is not without flaws, but it is clear and clean and the sound is fully stereophonic. It is presented in true widescreen and the color was very natural. It is nearly 3 hours long and I had no trouble with my player reading the second layer smoothly. I would give this print and transfer an 8 out of 10.
This DVD is not expensive, and its well worth the money for anyone who enjoys great world war 2 films... and this rates among the best of those concerning the European Theater. A fine DVD and a wonderful evening of entertainment.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Joseph H Pierre on April 27 2004
Format: VHS Tape
This film was made in 1977 about an actual srategic operation mounted in Europe in 1944. It was planned by Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery, the British commander who was well-known for his competition with (and dislike of) the American General George S. Patton, who is not represented in the film.

Montgomery is the bloke who got credit for pushing Rommel's Afrika Korps out of the Sahara, and for trying (unsuccessfully) to beat Patton across Sicily.

Like many top commanders, he was extremely egotistical, but short on aggression, as Patton demonstrated, and in this case his "Operation Market Garden" turned out to be a hairbrained disaster and blood bath: the Aircraft and gliders missed many of their drop zones and failed to drop vehicles and armament as planned (gliders were a disaster on D-Day, too, and they should have known). Eisenhower, being more politician than general, and trying to placate the Brits, let Monty talk him into the disastrous plan.) In the story, at least, one of the top British commanders refused to accept photographic evidence that German "Tiger" tanks from an SS Panzer division near Ramaden (one of their targets, which was supposed to be a "cakewalk") because he didn't want the operation to be delayed, which resulted in many unnecessary deaths. At the end of the movie, he said, "Well, as you know, I always thought we were trying to go a bridge too far." Hence the title. The man he addressed, played by Connery, should have shot him on the spot. The route chosen for the main body of troops who were to support the
airborne units was too narrow, incapable of carrying the required traffic, and resulted in the operation taking over a week, instead of the planned two days.
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