A Conspiracy of Paper: A Novel and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 12.27
  • List Price: CDN$ 17.00
  • You Save: CDN$ 4.73 (28%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

A Conspiracy of Paper: A Novel Paperback – Jan 30 2001


See all 13 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 12.27
CDN$ 7.10 CDN$ 0.01

Join Amazon Student in Canada



Frequently Bought Together

Customers buy this book with The Devil's Company: A Novel CDN$ 12.64

A Conspiracy of Paper: A Novel + The Devil's Company: A Novel
Price For Both: CDN$ 24.91

Show availability and shipping details

  • This item: A Conspiracy of Paper: A Novel

    In Stock.
    Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
    FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ CDN$ 25. Details

  • The Devil's Company: A Novel

    In Stock.
    Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
    FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ CDN$ 25. Details


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 480 pages
  • Publisher: Ballantine Books; 2nd Printing edition (Jan. 30 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0804119120
  • ISBN-13: 978-0804119122
  • Product Dimensions: 20.9 x 14 x 2.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 363 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (155 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #244,341 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
FOR SOME YEARS NOW, the gentlemen of the book trade have pressed me in the most urgent fashion to commit my memoirs to paper; for, these men have argued, there are many who would gladly pay a few shillings to learn of the true and surprising adventures of my life. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Dignazio on July 13 2004
Format: Paperback
This is a terrific novel. Crisply written dialogue and always twisting and turning plot that keeps you guessing. Despite the action and intrigue, the story is very plausible. I'm looking forward to Mr. Liss' other novels.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
When we are faced with a main character like Ben Weaver, involved in performing tasks like the ones mentioned in the title of this review, we know we are in for a great ride. David Liss does not disappoint us and delivers on this implicit promise, clearly showing his gifts as a writer in the process. The author presents a highly interesting historical novel, with an intricate plot, and full of twists that will leave the readers guessing until the end. The fact that he deals with the financial markets and concepts like probability in the eighteenth century, added to the attractiveness of the story for me, since these are topics with which I have been involved throughout my studies and in my current job.
It is an era of turmoil in England; King James has been deposed and is supported by France. This is the ideal setting for criminals to operate, since confusion reigns in the country. Ben Weaver is a Jew who left his father's home and changed his name a few years ago and had a brief moment of fame as a pugilist. Now he sustains himself by working as hired help in various enterprises, most of them dealing with helping people that have fallen victims of illegal acts. Weaver, whose real name is Lienzo (those who read "The Coffee Trader" will recognize the name), tells the story that starts with a murder of sorts in which he was involved. He was trying to recover the pocketbook of Sir Owen and when faced with a murderer his only option was to strike back and kill him.
Most of the thefts in the city are orchestrated or supervised by a character named Wild, who has all kinds of ruffians working for him and who offers services similar to the ones Weaver offers.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By dikybabe on June 21 2004
Format: Paperback
This marvelous historical mystery fiction reads right out of the pages of today's news, with stock trading scandals still undergoing prosecution and conspiracy uppermost in most folks minds as a normal part of everyday 21st century news.
David Liss' robust and manly Jewish ex-pugilist, Ben Weaver, lives in the midst of rough times in 1719's London, a life he has chosen, apart from his heritage of Iberian/Portugese Jews settled into their own part of London then. Weaver, his pseudonym, earns his keep by seeking out and bringing to justice the criminals who trespass on the wealthy, while regaining the treasures of the wealthy for a price. His "trade" parallels that of a most corrupt pre-police enforcer, Jonathan Wild. And Weaver finds himself rival, on a small scale, to Wild's organization. This set-up alone threatens Weaver's very life, but he seems to thrive on adversity, and utilizes his unlikely friendship with a Welsh surgeon to survive the underground powers. It is when he becomes further immersed into his past, indeed the life and family he has rejected as a young man, that Weaver's greatest adventure begins, as he faces the conflicts of a man's roots, namely his Jewish foundations, while seeking to solve a mystery about stock trading in those early market days.
Liss' understanding of financial dealings makes this very hefty and informative tale a tool of education as well as entertainment. He defty employs a fast moving, high action plot to seduce the reader into what might seem dry and boring, the financial trading scene, imbuing it all with an aura of intrigue. Surely anyone who has studied the trade disasters of modern day stock exchanges can identify with the excitement and confusion of the 1719 trade market. A lesson in economics awaits the reader, as well as a grand adventure.
Highly recommend!
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By E. Schell on June 12 2004
Format: Paperback
Reviewer Lee Armstrong suggests that David Liss may have invented a new genre of "financial thrillers." Au contraire! There are hundreds of books in this category, or at least in the "financial fiction" category (many of them, like Black Money, definitely thrillers).
For a listing of books in this genre, see [...] which also has links to
"Money in History" and "Financial Scandals." Happy searching!
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Lee Armstrong on April 16 2004
Format: Paperback
Perhaps David Liss has started a new genre, the financial thriller. In the twists and turns of the tale of Benjamin Weaver, Liss allows the historical backdrop of London in 1719 and the impending scandal of the South Seas Company to dress an amazingly complex train of scandal and duplicity. Using an historical figure Jonathan Wild as the arch-villain as an 18th century Mafioso profiting from theft, prostitution and even "peaching" his own crooks to the gallows for profit when they've outlived their usefulness, Liss has a great cast of characters. The behind-the-scenes maneuvering of the Bank of England's Bloathwait vs. the South Seas Company's Adelman serves to keep each new discovery off-balance. The other remarkable accomplishment is the amazing amount of humor that Liss scatters through the tale with Weaver's observations of various loose characters. The supporting characters of his buddy Elias who performs surgery when not too drunk, Kate Cole the un-penitant prostitute and Sir Owen gives amazing possibilities for a budding screenwriter. As Weaver seeks to find the cause for his father's death, we are constantly caught off guard with each new bogus stock or less-than-random act of violence. Cousin Miriam adds a love interest and issues of feminism to the mix. Add to this the cultural backdrop of Weaver being a Jew in Christian England, and Liss weaves an incredibly rich and complex tale that keeps our interest as the pages burn from turning. The climactic scene in the theatre as Weaver unmasks the mysterious phantom of Martin Rochester is breath taking. Bravo!
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Product Images from Customers

Most recent customer reviews

Search


Feedback