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A Death in Vienna [Mass Market Paperback]

Daniel Silva
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
List Price: CDN$ 10.99
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Book Description

Feb. 1 2005 Gabriel Allon Novels

Art restorer and sometime spy Gabriel Allon is sent to Vienna to investigate a bombing and uncovers a portrait of evil stretching across sixty years and thousands of lives-and into his own personal nightmares.


Frequently Bought Together

A Death in Vienna + Prince of Fire + The Confessor
Price For All Three: CDN$ 31.03

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Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Silva completes his cycle of three interconnected novels (The English Assassin; The Confessor) dealing with "the unfinished business of the Holocaust" with this superbly crafted narrative of espionage and foreign intrigue. During the later stages of WWII, Sturmbannführer Erich Radek's job was to erase all evidence of the Holocaust. Radek, now known as Ludwig Vogel, is chairman of the Danube Valley Trade and Investment Corporation and lives quietly in Vienna. A bombing at the Austrian Wartime Claims and Inquiries office leaves chief investigator Eli Lavon near death. Undercover Mossad agent Gabriel Allon, protagonist of the two previous novels, is ordered by Israeli spymaster Ari Shamron to ferret out the perpetrator. Allon is reluctant-he's working as an art restorer on one of Bellini's great altarpieces in Venice-but Eli is an old friend from the secret service, and duty calls. The case becomes personal when Allon, reading his mother's account of her time in the camps "I will not tell all the things I saw. I cannot. I owe this much to the dead" discovers that not only was Radek a sadistic monster, his mother was very nearly murdered by him. The chase is long and complex as agents from a number of international spy groups circle and harass Allon as he hunts down the infamous and still deadly Radek. Those seeking cheap thrills should look elsewhere. Action and suspense abound, but this is serious fiction with a serious purpose. Silva keeps the pressure on the reader as well as his characters as there are important lessons to be learned and vital history to be remembered.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Silva writes le Carre-style spy novels in which the action, despite careening across cities and continents, retains knife-edge-sharp suspense, as one man confronts a host of ingenious enemies. He brings something new to the formula, too, a hero whose day job is his real passion, not merely a cover for his spy self. Silva's hero, Gabriel Allon, is a restorer of paintings and frescoes (a large part of the fascination of this series is the care Silva takes to let the reader in on the painstaking art of restoration). Allon is also a reluctant member of Israeli intelligence, his ties to that world based on bonds of shared tragedy with his fellow spies. This time out, Allon is called to leave his restoration of a Bellini altarpiece in Venice when an old friend and contact--head of the Wartime Claims and Inquiries office--dies in an al-Qaeda-related bombing in Vienna. Allon's search in the Austrian city (rendered in suitably sinister office blocks and cafes that suggest the classic film noir The Third Man) leads him to a suspected Nazi war criminal and down a path of tortuous memories. Scrupulously avoiding the whiplash that comes from too much action in too many places in too short a time (an endemic condition in lesser spy novels), this finely wrought thriller reads like an exquisitely suspenseful chess game. Connie Fletcher
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If only it were true . . . April 25 2004
Format:Hardcover
A bomb explodes in the Vienna office of a hunter of German war criminals.Thus is "art restorer and sometime spy Gabriel Allon" drawn into a search for a repulsive former German officer, sadist, torturer and killer.
If the story weren't based on an actual human disaster of massive magnitude, it would be more enjoyable. Instead, to be reminded of the millions cold-bloodedly murdered by the German nation and its allies is depressing.
But Silva writes a suspense filled novel of Allon's search. The characters are richly human. They are not supermen; they are humans seeking justice in an unjust world. Even for crimes that happened a half-century, their passion to seek justice for the dead drives them to put their own lives at risk.
Silva's plot never stops or falters. The action keeps pushing ahead, though the reader might find a need to take a break from the recounting of the gruesome deeds being avenged.
The knowledge that the background events Silva weaves into his story are, as noted, not the kind of things most people want to think about. But Silva tells a story of long-delayed justice that we can all hope - or wish - takes place in venues outside of fiction.
Jerry
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent ending to a 3 book series May 5 2004
By Kristi
Format:Hardcover
I had just finished reading the last/newest book from my favorite author Patricia Cornwell and needed something new. On her website she recommended this book. When I looked into it further I decided to read the first two in the series as well. In 2 weeks I read all 3 books, and I have 4 children and a full time job. All three books just can't be put down!! The characters are so well written that you forget the books are fiction (even though some of the book is based on reality). I could picture the whole scene in my mind. I would highly recommend all 3 of these novels. Daniel Silva is a first rate author in my book!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A STELLAR VOICE PERFORMANCE April 11 2004
By Gail Cooke TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
Although a scion of Hollywood's famed Goldwyn family, Tony Goldwyn has very much made it on his own as producer, director, and actor. As producer he brought us "A Walk On The Moon" (1999); as director he gave us "Someone Like You" (2001). His acting credits are extensive with TV appearances running the gamut from "Frasier" to "L.A. Law." He voiced the title character for Disney's "Tarzan." All who heard know he is a voice performer par excellence, and this is evidenced once again in his reading of Silva's latest.

International suspense is Daniel Silva's milieu, and strongly imagined characters only one of his strengths. He has been compared to the masterful John le Carre, and rightly so. "A Death In Vienna" is related to two of his earlier works, "The English Assassin" and "The Confessor." For pure pleasure and a greater appreciation read or listen to all three.
This time out an art restorer who doubles as a spy, Gabriel Allon, is summoned to Vienna where an old friend has died in a bombing. His task is to ferret out the truth behind this death. As clues lead to a man now living in Vienna, the search takes on new meaning for Allon as he reads his mother's account of her days in a concentration camp: "I will not tell all the things I saw. I cannot. I owe this much to the dead." - Testimony of Irene Allon, March 19, 1957.
Not only may this man be responsible for his friend's death, but may also have tried to kill Allon's mother. Shadows of the Holocaust fall on this elegantly wrought tale of suspense.
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars A STELLAR VOICE PERFORMANCE April 11 2004
By Gail Cooke TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
Although a scion of Hollywood's famed Goldwyn family, Tony Goldwyn has very much made it on his own as producer, director, and actor. As producer he brought us "A Walk On The Moon" (1999); as director he gave us "Someone Like You" (2001). His acting credits are extensive with TV appearances running the gamut from "Frasier" to "L.A. Law." He voiced the title character for Disney's "Tarzan." All who heard know he is a voice performer par excellence, and this is evidenced once again in his reading of Silva's latest.

International suspense is Daniel Silva's milieu, and strongly imagined characters only one of his strengths. He has been compared to the masterful John le Carre, and rightly so. "A Death In Vienna" is related to two of his earlier works, "The English Assassin" and "The Confessor." For pure pleasure and a greater appreciation read or listen to all three.
This time out an art restorer who doubles as a spy, Gabriel Allon, is summoned to Vienna where an old friend has died in a bombing. His task is to ferret out the truth behind this death. As clues lead to a man now living in Vienna, the search takes on new meaning for Allon as he reads his mother's account of her days in a concentration camp: "I will not tell all the things I saw. I cannot. I owe this much to the dead." - Testimony of Irene Allon, March 19, 1957.
Not only may this man be responsible for his friend's death, but may also have tried to kill Allon's mother. Shadows of the Holocaust fall on this elegantly wrought tale of suspense.
- Gail Cooke
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By Larry
Format:Hardcover
A death in Vienna starts the action in this seventh thriller by Daniel Silva. The Wartime Claims and Inquiries Office is destroyed by a bomb. The reason for the killing is that apparently an old man contacted the office after claiming to have seen an old SS officer now going by the name Ludwig Vogel. As Sturmbannfuhrer Erich Radek, Vogel is responsible for the deaths of thousands of Jews in W.W.II. Vogel is now a very wealthy industrialist in Austria. The Israeli government calls into action Gabriel Allon, their assassin who also works as an art restorer, to look into the accusation. Hampering their investigation are Vogel's henchmen who have no hesitation in killing Allon to save Vogel. However, Allon's true motivation to bring Vogel to justice lies in his own past.
Daniel Silva is one of the finest thriller writers currently working. His books are all compulsive reads filled with high octane thrills. However, one cannot get over the feeling that this book is his first stumble. According the author's note, "A DEATH IN VIENNA is actually the third book in a cycle dealing with the unfinished business of the Holocaust. Nazi art looting and the collaboration of Swiss banks served as the backdrop for THE ENGLISH ASSASSIN. The role of the Catholic Church in the Holocaust and the silence of Pope Pius XII inspired THE CONFESSOR." The current book is also based loosely on real events. However, in the previous books the historical events flowed from the action. This gave the books a greater sense of spontaneity. In this book, the real events dictate the progression of the book. This tends to make the plot and pacing appear too artificial and predictable. It is a much more contrived work. There really is no true character development and all of this has been covered before in both popular and 'serious' fiction.
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Most recent customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars we must never forget the Holocaust
This book, and it's two predecessors on the subject of the Holocaust, needed to be written and needs to be read by everybody, especially our young people, students, etc. Read more
Published 10 months ago by John Cowan
4.0 out of 5 stars Not his best, but still very good.
I have been a hardcore fan of Silva since I discovered his novel "The English Assassin" in the spring of 2002. Read more
Published on July 19 2004 by Vinny Mac
4.0 out of 5 stars High quality thriller.
When a bomb explodes in the Vienna Wartime Claims and Inquiry Office, killing Eli Lavon, an elderly Jewish man who investigated crimes relating to the Holocaust, Israeli... Read more
Published on July 15 2004 by Henry W. Wagner
5.0 out of 5 stars A Great Read for the Beach or for the Road!
The Confessor is a gripping read with a highly relevent plot. Gabriel Allon is called upon to investigate a murder of a Jewish professor in Munich and the investigation leads all... Read more
Published on June 24 2004
5.0 out of 5 stars Well done Mr. Silva
Well researched and written like McCrae's BARK OF THE DOGWOOD (though a totally different subject!) and well plotted and paced like Baldacci's SPLIT SECOND, A DEATH IN VIENNA is a... Read more
Published on June 20 2004
5.0 out of 5 stars Glowing Pains: To the Negative Reviewers
Daniel Silva has again capably demonstrated not only his talent, but also the development of his writing from his first novel to his latest. Read more
Published on June 3 2004
5.0 out of 5 stars Death In Vienna, and a lot of other places too........
Well, I thought this was such a great book, that after reading it, started getting all of Silva's other ones and am presently on his 3rd book. I can't wait to read them all. Read more
Published on May 28 2004 by Martha Graham
5.0 out of 5 stars Gabe Allon v.Jack Ryan?
Where are all the Gabriel Allon movies from Hollywood??? Oh yes, film industry Jews would rather churn out mind rotting and sexually degrading films and television shows. Read more
Published on May 28 2004 by Rivkah Rubinstein
5.0 out of 5 stars Disturbing, real, haunting
I try and avoid novels and anything dealing with Nazis et al, but lately I've found myself going back to them. Read more
Published on April 27 2004
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