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A Latin Grammar [Paperback]

James Morwood
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
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Book Description

Feb. 18 2003 0198601999 978-0198601999
A Latin Grammar offers: The most accessible students' guide: clearly written explanations of key Latin grammar points in an easily navigable layout Hundreds of example sentences: illustrating every grammar point Vocabulary list: covering all the Latin words found in the text Glossary of grammatical terms: extra support for beginners, and a handy refresher reference for more advance students Additional information about the Roman world: special appendices on Roman dates, money, weights and measures, and names provide essential information about the Roman world More study help: an explanation of literary terms and a list of helpful study tips give students invaluable advice on learning the language Guide to pronunciation: a guide to how Latin was pronounced helps students bring to life this influential language

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Review

`If you are looking to bin the old Kennedys and restock Latin grammars, then this is certainly worth considering, being competitively priced and easy to use.' Hilary Walters, Jact Review, Series 2, No.27, Summer 00.

`There is a pleasing historical sense to the book, with short articles on Latin pronunciation in England and the development of Kennedy's primer, along with the gender rhymes, offered as a curiosity ... The grammar has a fresher, more modern appearance and style.' Hilary Walters, Jact Review, Series 2, No.27, Summer 00.

About the Author

James Morwood, formerly Head of Classics at Harrow School in England, is now a Fellow at Wadham College, Oxford and Grocyn Lecturer for the Literae Humaniores Faculty.

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A clear, concise, and very handy Latin Grammar Jan. 15 2001
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
Intelligently organized and formatted, this Latin grammar is an excellent resource for beginning and intermediate Latin students. In his preface, the author states that he intends the book to supersede the classic Latin grammar written by Benjamin Hall Kennedy. I'm not familiar with that work, apparently a mainstay of British Latin students for generations. My own acquaintance is with the grammars of American Latinists such as Bennett, Gildersleeve, Hadley, and Allen & Greenough.
The author has wisely chosen to leave out cumbersome, needless detail. Instead, clarity and simplicity are everywhere in abundance. Each section describing a specific grammatical point begins with examples of the construction -- if an analogue exists -- in English. In an age where students' knowledge of basic English grammar can no longer be taken for granted, this is a useful feature indeed.
Arguably the best feature of the book is the way in which grammar points are illustrated by short, easily comprehensible Latin sentences in bold type, with accompanying translations. To his credit, Morwood has studiously avoided the approach found in grammars of yesteryear, viz., using much longer sentences pulled out of classical Latin authors such as Caesar or Cicero to illustrate even the most simple grammatical rule.
The value of the book for teachers is enhanced by the inclusion in each chapter of practice sentences in both Latin (some of which are from classical authors) and English. Separate English-Latin and Latin-English vocabularies at the back of the book are designed to accompany the practice exercises. There is also a "reference grammar" overview of the verb system, bordered with a grey margin for ease of reference. The book also contains a very handy Glossary of Grammatical Terms.
In all, a splendid little book of enormous utility; highly recommended for those seeking a clearly written and easy to understand treatment of basic Latin grammar.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Accessible Guide to the Latin Language Jan. 13 2002
Format:Paperback
The Latin grammar by James Morwood is a smoothly flowing, accessible guide to the Latin language, providing many short sentence examples and explaining nouns and noun inflection, adjectives, adverbs, verb conjugation, and sentence construction in depth. The readability is excellent, and the information presented is easily utilized.
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very good. Dec 31 2001
Format:Paperback
This book is directed mostly at more advanced students of language whom have a grasp of basic language vocabulary
(e.g. verbs, declensions, cases, tenses, etc.). It is none the less very helpful to the begginer student as well because of its lexicon of language words at the beggining of the book with in-depth descriptions of each case, tense, declension, and so on.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.1 out of 5 stars  14 reviews
94 of 96 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A clear, concise, and very handy Latin Grammar Jan. 15 2001
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Intelligently organized and formatted, this Latin grammar is an excellent resource for beginning and intermediate Latin students. In his preface, the author states that he intends the book to supersede the classic Latin grammar written by Benjamin Hall Kennedy. I'm not familiar with that work, apparently a mainstay of British Latin students for generations. My own acquaintance is with the grammars of American Latinists such as Bennett, Gildersleeve, Hadley, and Allen & Greenough.
The author has wisely chosen to leave out cumbersome, needless detail. Instead, clarity and simplicity are everywhere in abundance. Each section describing a specific grammatical point begins with examples of the construction -- if an analogue exists -- in English. In an age where students' knowledge of basic English grammar can no longer be taken for granted, this is a useful feature indeed.
Arguably the best feature of the book is the way in which grammar points are illustrated by short, easily comprehensible Latin sentences in bold type, with accompanying translations. To his credit, Morwood has studiously avoided the approach found in grammars of yesteryear, viz., using much longer sentences pulled out of classical Latin authors such as Caesar or Cicero to illustrate even the most simple grammatical rule.
The value of the book for teachers is enhanced by the inclusion in each chapter of practice sentences in both Latin (some of which are from classical authors) and English. Separate English-Latin and Latin-English vocabularies at the back of the book are designed to accompany the practice exercises. There is also a "reference grammar" overview of the verb system, bordered with a grey margin for ease of reference. The book also contains a very handy Glossary of Grammatical Terms.
In all, a splendid little book of enormous utility; highly recommended for those seeking a clearly written and easy to understand treatment of basic Latin grammar.
35 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Short and sweet March 17 2005
By SkookumPete - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This is not a course in Latin but on the other hand it is not a reference grammar either. As the introduction says, "it aims to be a 'primer' (a first book) and at the same time something more than that." In fact, it is a short introduction to all the major grammatical points of the language as well as a handy reference for the accidence, without covering all the fine points you would expect to find in a true reference grammar like Gildersleeve. I particularly like the convenient groupings of things like place words (ubi, hic, illic, inde, etc.) and some of the confusing adverbs and conjunctions like quidem, quin, quominus, and quamuis (not quamvis, note; the letter "v" is not used in this book). There are a few short exercises, but no keys. Appendices cover dates, money, Roman names, literary terms, and weights and measures. A short vocabulary includes only words used in the exercises. All in all, a surprising amount of information is packed into less than 200 pages, yet the book does not feel at all dense or cramped.
24 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Accessible Guide to the Latin Language Jan. 13 2002
By Thomas L. Cornell - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
The Latin grammar by James Morwood is a smoothly flowing, accessible guide to the Latin language, providing many short sentence examples and explaining nouns and noun inflection, adjectives, adverbs, verb conjugation, and sentence construction in depth. The readability is excellent, and the information presented is easily utilized.
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Most concise Latin grammar available May 11 2007
By Ed the Scot - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book is a must have for the student of Latin. It is by far the most concise book on Latin grammar out there. It is excellent for review and as a reference tool. It is not a textbook and should not be used to learn the langauge. Wheelock and others are more helpful for that purpose. But you have already studied a year or two of Latin and need an occaisonal refresher on the conjugations, declension or grammatical rules this is a highly useful book to own. It is remarkably well organized and I have found it especially useful as a way of reviewing and reinforcing previously learned rules and forms.
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great reference March 27 2008
By Ryan Shue - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This is a great reference grammar for anyone studying Latin. Complete, concise, portable, well-organized, and cheap. It has short, to-the-point explanations of all points of Latin grammar. Perfect for the beginning/intermediate student of Latin who just needs a quick explanation of usage or forms. There are excellent tables of forms for nouns, adjectives, verbs, pronouns, etc. that are very helpful for review. The only problem i have with this book is the omission of 'v' in favor of 'u' throughout, hence 'vivo' is spelled 'uiuo' making the obvious derivative "vivacious" not as obvious. I understand the argument, but if I'm not mistaken wasn't 'V' the letter that was used in Classical Latin? 'IESVS CHRISTVS' not 'IESUS CHRISTUS'. Also, if we want to read Latin as Cicero did shouldn't we eliminate punctuation LOWER-CASE LETTERS AND WORDSPACINGTHESECONVENTIONSWERENOTUSEDUNTILHUNDREDSOFYEARSLATER That said, this is a great little reference grammar for those starting out in Latin.. buy it!
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