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A Maiden's Grave Mass Market Paperback – 1995


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback
  • Publisher: Signet (1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451204298
  • ISBN-13: 978-0451204295
  • Product Dimensions: 11.4 x 3 x 19.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 204 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (65 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #836,627 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Hardcover
This nail biter of a thriller involves a hijacked schoolbus carrying eight deaf school children and two teachers. Sound familiar? Mary Willis Walker's "Under the Beetle's Cellar" develops a very similar premise. Both books even include an asthmatic among the kidnapped children.

But in Deaver's skillful hands, the story works again. The two protagonists are Arthur Potter, senior FBI negotiator, nearing retirement, and Melanie Charrol, a young, timid deaf teacher whose lonely passion is music. The three kidnappers are prison escapees who have already killed three people before holing up in an abandoned slaughterhouse with the terrified hostages. Potter works against time to get inside the head of their leader, Lou Handy, and derail his threat to kill one hostage every hour until his demands are met.
Meanwhile, state officials have their own agenda, as does the press, and their machinations ratchet up the suspense in several different directions. And, inside, Melanie fights her fears, holding onto an image of Potter (who she has glimpsed outside) as inspiration, and works feverishly to save at least a few of the girls.
Deaver's characterizations - the outbursts of rebellion and tears among the children, the gleeful coldbloodedness of Handy, Potter's feverish analysis and risky gambles, Melanie's terrified bravery - hurtle the plot forward, while the slaughterhouse atmosphere is dank and cold, and the action is non-stop, right up to a couple of switch-back twists at the end.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I'm a big fan of Jeffrey Deaver's Lincoln Rhyme series and eagerly picked up A Maiden's Grave. Unfortunately, this novel simply isn't the same calibre of the Rhyme books.
The plot involves the kidnapping of several young deaf girls who are held hostage at an old slaughterhouse in Kansas. The main character in the book is Arthur Potter, an FBI hostage negotiator; he's accompanied by the standard techno-geek, the mousey assistant who faithfully logs info on the bad guys, and the stunningly gorgeous ex-model assistant Angie. For fans of the Rhyme series, you'll recognize this Amelia Sachs-clone immediately...the only change is the hair color.
The villains are interesting, but not enough is shared about them to keep this reader interested. Most of the book is spent slogging through countless scenes of tech-talk, political in-fighting, and the developing "relationship" between one of the deaf women and the hostage negotiator. This plotline alone strains the credibility of the book.
All in all, it appears that Deaver has done his research, but the plot is hackneyed and too drawn out -- I've even lost count of the number of times the hostage negotiation team "bursts into applause" at the slightest "accomplishment" of the hero, Potter.
If you like police procedurals, read A Maiden's Grave. If you want an engaging novel, you'd be better off reading the Lincoln Rhyme series. And for the ultimate hostage negotiation novel, check out Robert Crais' "Hostage" -- that was a phenomenal read!
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
It was a while ago that i read this book, and it was my first of Deavers. Since then i have bought every single book he has ever written, and have read all but a few of them.
This is simple an outstanding book. it is the best hostage thriller i have ever read, and that i expect i ever will.
Deaver mounts the tension beautifully...every now and then it gets so high that you literally feel it as he lets a little of the tension out...it's a wonderful display of suspense writing.
Deavers characters are vivid, and his characterisation is wonderfully subtle. they are well rounded and very human. Arthur Potter is a compelling hero, and his "invisble" relationship with Melanie is brilliantly done. the way they feel connected to each other during the hostage negotiation even though they have never met is wonderful. I felt very moved.
As well as being a very suspenseful book, this is also an extremely emotional one. there are times when you really feel very sorry for the characters, and an insipid hate for their characters. I felt particularly sorry for poor Donna Hawstrawn. I really wanted this book to keep going, just so that i could see if she would be okay...there are also a couple of moments in the book when you might be moved to tears. there are some devastating events, which really tug at you.
Deavers portrayal of the Deaf is completely unpatronising. He is extremely good at writing about people with what might be termed "handicaps", and in this case i think he was at hsi most sucessful. He wrote about it in such a way that you did feel slight sympathy, but moreover you felt proud of these people. Also, i felt a strange but strong urge to actually really try and get a feel for what it might be like to be Deaf...
This is a brilliant book, with a good twist at the end. good characters, emotional writing, stunning suspense, and an excellent hostage thriller. Deaver is simply the best.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
It was a while ago that i read this book, and it was my first of Deavers. Since then i have bought every single book he has ever written, and have read all but a few of them.
This is simple an outstanding book. it is the best hostage thriller i have ever read, and that i expect i ever will.
Deaver mounts the tension beautifully...every now and then it gets so high that you literally feel it as he lets a little of the tension out...it's a wonderful display of suspense writing.
Deavers characters are vivid, and his characterisation is wonderfully subtle. they are well rounded and very human. Arthur Potter is a compelling hero, and his "invisble" relationship with Melanie is brilliantly done. the way they feel connected to each other during the hostage negotiation even though they have never met is wonderful. I felt very moved.
As well as being a very suspenseful book, this is also an extremely emotional one. there are times when you really feel very sorry for the characters, and an insipid hate for their characters. I felt particularly sorry for poor Donna Hawstrawn. I really wanted this book to keep going, just so that i could see if she would be okay...there are also a couple of moments in the book when you might be moved to tears. there are some devastating events, which really tug at you.
Deavers portrayal of the Deaf is completely unpatronising. He is extremely good at writing about people with what might be termed "handicaps", and in this case i think he was at hsi most sucessful. He wrote about it in such a way that you did feel slight sympathy, but moreover you felt proud of these people. Also, i felt a strange but strong urge to actually really try and get a feel for what it might be like to be Deaf...
This is a brilliant book, with a good twist at the end. good characters, emotional writing, stunning suspense, and an excellent hostage thriller. Deaver is simply the best.
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