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A Momentary Lapse Of Reason [Original recording remastered]

Pink Floyd Audio CD
3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (230 customer reviews)
Price: CDN$ 24.32
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Frequently Bought Together

A Momentary Lapse Of Reason + The Division Bell 20th Anniversary (Vinyl) + Wish You Were Here
Price For All Three: CDN$ 78.30

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Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details


1. Signs Of Life
2. Learning To Fly
3. The Dogs Of War
4. One Slip
5. On The Turning Away
6. Yet Another Movie (6a Round And Around)
7. A New Machine (Part 1)
8. Terminal Frost
9. A New Machine (Part 2)
10. Sorrow

Product Description

Product Description

Pink Floyd 2011 Remasters

Amazon.ca

Though many predicted that Roger Waters's acrimonious split with the band after 1983's aptly named Final Cut would ultimately spell the end of Pink Floyd, the remaining band members confounded pundits by extending their status as classic rock's most ponderous dinosaurs into the 1990s and beyond. And if the title was a gentle jab at Waters after a years-long legal struggle over the Floyd moniker, the music was all too familiar; some would say even formulaic. And lest anyone doubted that the absence of Waters's dour soul would lighten things up a bit, guitarist and post facto leader Dave Gilmour gamely took on the Mantle of Conscience for topics ranging from the cold war ("The Dogs of War") to yuppie self-indulgence ("On the Turning Away"). And if this album sometimes evokes an uncomfortable feeling of a band on autopilot, it's one that can still turn out the likes of the anthemic "Learning to Fly" on cruise control. --Jerry McCulley

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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars The grand return of Pink Floyd June 20 2004
Format:Audio CD
Pink Floyd's triumphant comeback A Momentary Lapse of Reason was released in September of 1987. The album was the first without original member Roger Waters whom acrimoniously split from his bandmates in 1985. For years, many thought that 1983's aptly named The Final Cut was the farewell album of Pink Floyd's but guitarist/vocalist David Gilmour, drummer Nick Mason(although he plays on half of the discs because his playing was underestimated by Waters and wasn't until the Momentary Lapse tour where he played better again) and returning keyboardist Rick Wright(as a salaried musician nonetheless) along with co-producer Bob Ezrin and session bassist Tony Levin spent eight months recording the album at Dave's home studio the Astoria in London and at various studios in London and L.A.(where they relocated after Roger's lawyers threatened legal action) with many people doubting the Floyd being relevant without Waters. However, when I(as an 11 year old boy) first heard the first single Learning to Fly, I was in reassured that Floyd was back in a big way. When my father brought home the album for me shortly after its release, I was amazed on how superb this album was. It was in fact David Gilmour whom sang most of the classics from 1969 to 1975 before Waters went on his ego trip for the nest three discs(no disrespect to the last three albums, I like all of Floyd's work and am a die-hard fan). The songwriting burden nestled now on David's shoulders(he wrote all of the music and gave credit to those who came up with small ideas but he isn't confident in writing lyrics hence other people help with the lyrics). The instrumental opening Signs of Life dated back to a riff that first emerged in the Animals era. The aforementioned Learning to Fly was a great song. Read more ›
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5.0 out of 5 stars Pink Floyd's Instrumental Cold War May 22 2004
Format:Audio CD
The album indeed has an an 80's sound, but this is certainly not the 80's of "Safety Dance". A Momentary Lapse of Reason represents the best of that decade's possibilities--yes, the sound is "harder" than you might find before or after, but I greatly prefer this slightly edgier sound to the feel of current pop music. Although thematically not as unified as its predecessors, there is a definite flow in the mood of the album, from a guardedly optimistic beginning to a hopeless, bitter end. The sound clips are well placed to augment the running themes. Probably the best example of that is in "Yet Another Movie", one of the album's greatest stars, where clips from Casablanca set the scene for a world that seems to be entering into a second Holocaust--this time a nuclear one.
Despite what some say, I have a personal theory that there is in fact a loose theme on A Momentary Lapse of Reason. Judging from some of his output on his solo album About Face, Mr. Gilmour (the main lyricist) seems to have been quite concerned with the situation of the Cold War. It seems to me that the album, when you put it all together, has possibly got a nuclear-destruction scenario. Even the title A Momentary Lapse of Reason reminds me of the old description of what would happen if someone did push the nuclear button: MAD--Mutual Assured Destruction. Another clue may be in the instrumental "Terminal Frost": its title suggests nuclear winter, and the sound clip in it: "Never, ever again..." evokes for me the fear of a second Holocaust--for which a worldwide nuclear cataclysm would certainly qualify.
To me, all of the songs on this album have a place--even the much maligned "A New Machine" songs.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The grand return of Pink Floyd May 13 2004
Format:Audio CD
Pink Floyd's triumphant comeback A Momentary Lapse of Reason was released in September of 1987. The album was the first without original member Roger Waters whom acrimoniously split from his bandmates in 1985. For years, many thought that 1983's aptly named The Final Cut was the farewell album of Pink Floyd's but guitarist/vocalist David Gilmour, drummer Nick Mason(although he plays on half of the discs because his playing was underestimated by Waters and wasn't until the Momentary Lapse tour where he played better again) and returning keyboardist Rick Wright(as a salaried musician nonetheless) along with co-producer Bob Ezrin and session bassist Tony Levin spent eight months recording the album at Dave's home studio the Astoria in London and at various studios in London and L.A.(where they relocated after Roger's lawyers threatened legal action) with many people doubting the Floyd being relevant without Waters. However, when I(as an 11 year old boy) first heard the first single Learning to Fly, I was in reassured that Floyd was back in a big way. When my father brought home the album for me shortly after its release, I was amazed on how superb this album was. It was in fact David Gilmour whom sang most of the classics from 1969 to 1975 before Waters went on his ego trip for the nest three discs(no disrespect to the last three albums, I like all of Floyd's work and am a die-hard fan). The songwriting burden nestled now on David's shoulders(he wrote all of the music and gave credit to those who came up with small ideas but he isn't confident in writing lyrics hence other people help with the lyrics). The instrumental opening Signs of Life dated back to a riff that first emerged in the Animals era. The aforementioned Learning to Fly was a great song. Read more ›
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Most recent customer reviews
3.0 out of 5 stars late gasp
Seems to be more disconnected and random than previous albums. Pulse woud be a better choice for post-waters floyd.not really worthy
Published on Aug. 2 2012 by N. Bruce Mortimer
4.0 out of 5 stars Pink Floyd proves there is life after Roger Waters
Whatever you think of Roger Waters, Pink Floyd was clearly never the same after his rather acrimonious exit. Read more
Published on July 6 2006 by Daniel Jolley
5.0 out of 5 stars A Momentary Lapse of Excellence...
To hear people say this is one of Pink Floyds not-so-great albums makes me want to throw fists. This cd is simply stunning and I LOVE it. Read more
Published on July 20 2004 by "calico_katt"
4.0 out of 5 stars Still Floyd, still good
Many people say of this album, "Good, but not Pink Floyd." To them I say that Pink Floyd, if anything was a band that was constantly on the move and changed its sound... Read more
Published on July 19 2004 by I. Smith
5.0 out of 5 stars A Definitely Awesome Album
The Final Cut was terrible so it was really great that they did this album. There are so many great songs. Yeah Roger Waters was not there, but it's a true Floyd album. Read more
Published on July 12 2004
3.0 out of 5 stars On the turning away
"A momentary lapse of reason" is considered one of Pink Floyd's poorest albums. Sure, Roger Walters was not on it, but it did generate two massive eighties singles:... Read more
Published on July 4 2004 by William
4.0 out of 5 stars Admit it. You miss Roger.
All in all, A Momentary Lapse Of Reason stands as a pretty decent David Gilmour solo record with the Pink Floyd name tacked on for the sake of album sales. Read more
Published on June 25 2004 by William J. Eichelberger
4.0 out of 5 stars Un-Floydian
"A Momentary Lapse of Reason" came out after Roger Waters (the main songwriter up to this point) left the band in pursuit of a solo carreer. Read more
Published on June 24 2004 by Lens Fortwright
3.0 out of 5 stars a disappointing album.
i am a huge floyd fan. i consider them THE best of the '70s. they did so much things for rock and should be getting the respect the beatles (favourite band of the '60s.. Read more
Published on May 21 2004 by lost_weasel
2.0 out of 5 stars WORST FLOYD ALBUM!
This is easily the worst Pink Floyd album. This album sounds like your typical cheesy 80s record meets Pink Floyd. Read more
Published on May 16 2004 by jxst
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