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A New World Paperback – Apr 6 2001


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: PAN Macmillan Adult (April 6 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0330351060
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330351065
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 19.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 200 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,887,335 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Hardcover
Yes, I see where the author is a very talented writer who can raise mundane, everyday experiences to a thoughtful new level. Perhaps it is my shortcoming and not his, but I need some kind of plot or a promise of a character's epiphany to keep me turning the pages. The book was set almost entirely in the apartment of the main character's parents, making it very claustrophobic. I recognize the art of the writing and the precision of the words, but I really did not enjoy reading it.
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Format: Hardcover
Amit Chaudhuri chronicles the return to Calcutta of an Indian-American who has recently been divorced. His arrival, his return to his parents' home, his re-immersion in Calcutta, his attempt to move through each unexceptional day -- all of these are the means by which this inarticulate and inadequate man tries to deal with the great crises which confront him. Those crises are, of course, the divorce and its aftermath, including his relations with the young son who joins him on this return to India; but they are as well the gap between himself and his own parents, who are of a different generation, who are aging, who do not understand the modern world and its habit of divorce.
The world is not always full of "sound and fury," as Amit Chaudhouri understands very well. Our destinies are worked out in the everyday, and we struggle as Wallace Stevens so aptly put it with "the maladies of the quotidian." It is the novel's triumph that these struggles reveal themselves beneath the everyday events Chaudhouri describes so well, and that a sense of loss and inadequacy permeates the quietly lyrical descriptions which are the substance of the novel.
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Format: Hardcover
Amit's Chaudhuri's first collection of three small novels entitled Freedom Song won him great critical acclaim and raves, even from such master stylists as Salman Rushdie over the beauty and thoughtfulness of his writing. Yes, the writing in this collection is very poetic and well-crafted, but the stories themselves never truly went anywhere. Unfortunately, his new novel A New World, suffers the same fate. The plot is a potentially revealing, touching and illuminating one, despite the fact that its same basic outlines have been used and reused in many different novels. Such a talented writer as Chaudhuri ought to be able to make something interesting and captivating out of it. In the novel, a man who has been living in the US, makes his regular visit to his parents in India with his young son, of whom he has custody for the summer. He has private regrets, of his failed marriage, of his relationship with his parents, and personal worries about his son, which of course are brought out throughout the course of the novel. His parents naturally have their own concerns and worries about him. So, in many ways this is meant to be an exploration of family bonds, of the strange feelings which accompany returning home after a long absence, of cultural collision in general.
In short, the novel's structure is a great opportunity for a writer as skilled as Chaudhuri to really make an impact, to write something about families, about parents and children that really captures an essence which everyone has felt. But, as in the case of his previous novels, this one ultimately drags and refuses to move, and a reader, no matter how much he loves Chaudhuri's prose, and wants to like the novel, will find himself yawning.
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By A Customer on Dec 21 2000
Format: Hardcover
Amit Chaudhuri is absolutely brilliant when it comes to breathing life into everyday stuff like visiting a bank, taking a walk or frying fish. This skill is a lot more germane for a novel like A Strange and Sublime Address. But in a book on a serious subject like divore and its aftermath his quotitidan observations are more of a distration than anything. I wish he had dealt with the emotional undercurrents more openly and at the same level of detail as mundane things like watching TV or toothpaste or bath soap.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 10 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Poetry in still life Sept. 14 2002
By stackofbooks - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
A New World, Chaudhuri's most recent novel, describes the summer spent by Dr. Jayojit Chatterjee, an economist in America, (and no, he does not know Dr. Amartya Sen!) who is back in Calcutta with his son, Bonny, after a divorce. Not much emotion rises to the surface, but Jayojit does mull over what went wrong with his marriage. His dad, the Admiral, meanwhile is busy leading a retired life complaining about the shoddy performance of banks and going out for his morning constitutionals. Joy's mother fusses over him and his son, frying "luchis" for breakfast and insisting that they eat them.
Chaudhuri does an absolutely brilliant job of describing the smallest of Indian transactions, such as a taxi ride or even business at the local bank. His sparse details of Jayojit's return to the US at the end of the summer, is heart-tuggingly accurate. In fact, this is the book that would tug at all kinds of strings for Indians across the diaspora. Chaudhuri's portraits of Jayojit's strained interactions with an environment at once familiar and strange to him are wonderful and something I could completely identify with. Also right on are the son, Bonny's, observations and comments about life around him. "Baba, what does "Kwality" mean?" he asks when he sees a van bearing the name on the streets. When his father explains that it is an ice cream truck, Bonny "lifts his chin from the (taxi) seat, and exclaims, "Ice cream?" as if, like doughnuts, ice cream was too outrageous to mention here."
While I loved all of Chaudhuri's precise details immensely (probably because of nostalgia stirred), occasionally his poetic descriptions of even the most basic of events started grating: "The sun dimmed, as if it had been snuffed out, and then kindled again as a cloud moved past."
I strongly believe that Amit Chaudhuri is a very gifted writer. His eye for precision is amazing. If he tightens his storylines, Chaudhuri will get a taste of an even bigger audience--something he most definitely deserves.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
A sensitive depiction of everyday life April 11 2001
By "sgutman3" - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Amit Chaudhuri chronicles the return to Calcutta of an Indian-American who has recently been divorced. His arrival, his return to his parents' home, his re-immersion in Calcutta, his attempt to move through each unexceptional day -- all of these are the means by which this inarticulate and inadequate man tries to deal with the great crises which confront him. Those crises are, of course, the divorce and its aftermath, including his relations with the young son who joins him on this return to India; but they are as well the gap between himself and his own parents, who are of a different generation, who are aging, who do not understand the modern world and its habit of divorce.
The world is not always full of "sound and fury," as Amit Chaudhouri understands very well. Our destinies are worked out in the everyday, and we struggle as Wallace Stevens so aptly put it with "the maladies of the quotidian." It is the novel's triumph that these struggles reveal themselves beneath the everyday events Chaudhouri describes so well, and that a sense of loss and inadequacy permeates the quietly lyrical descriptions which are the substance of the novel.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Again, Chaudhuri shows great, though unrealized potential Feb. 16 2001
By Corinna Byer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Amit's Chaudhuri's first collection of three small novels entitled Freedom Song won him great critical acclaim and raves, even from such master stylists as Salman Rushdie over the beauty and thoughtfulness of his writing. Yes, the writing in this collection is very poetic and well-crafted, but the stories themselves never truly went anywhere. Unfortunately, his new novel A New World, suffers the same fate. The plot is a potentially revealing, touching and illuminating one, despite the fact that its same basic outlines have been used and reused in many different novels. Such a talented writer as Chaudhuri ought to be able to make something interesting and captivating out of it. In the novel, a man who has been living in the US, makes his regular visit to his parents in India with his young son, of whom he has custody for the summer. He has private regrets, of his failed marriage, of his relationship with his parents, and personal worries about his son, which of course are brought out throughout the course of the novel. His parents naturally have their own concerns and worries about him. So, in many ways this is meant to be an exploration of family bonds, of the strange feelings which accompany returning home after a long absence, of cultural collision in general.
In short, the novel's structure is a great opportunity for a writer as skilled as Chaudhuri to really make an impact, to write something about families, about parents and children that really captures an essence which everyone has felt. But, as in the case of his previous novels, this one ultimately drags and refuses to move, and a reader, no matter how much he loves Chaudhuri's prose, and wants to like the novel, will find himself yawning. The flashbacks are not coherent enough, the emotions expressed by the characters too vague to make a reader feel for them,and ultimately, which is Chaudhuri's main problem, there is no real story. It is static, and nothing,even on an emotional level, really happens. The characters, as well-written as their actions are, remain flat, distanced, and unconnected, and in the end, a reader will probably have the feeling that he has walked away from something which denied its potential and ended up empty and flat instead of rich and meaningful. If only Chaudhuri could work on his plot and character development as much as he seems to on his beautful writing style,he would indeed be among the upper echelons of our contemporary writers.
Leaves much unsaid Jan. 8 2012
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Minimal descriptions with powerful eye for detail. Tells the story of a recently divorced father and his son traveling to India for the summer to stay with his parents. The divorce was a crushing blow for all and much of the story (and the writing) largely relies on the tension of what is left unsaid.
A relaxing and enjoyable book. June 29 2009
By Dick Johnson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The everyday lives of people are the same everywhere, even when there is little in common. Yet, the details of everyday life in India are so far removed from those in America that comparisons are nearly impossible.

If you have not read a book about India by an Indian author, this book would be a great choice for your first one. It is not the normal fare (which I love) of eight hundred pages and constant use of words from the various languages spoken in India.

Part of the difference is that Chaudhuri writes in English. Also, the main character, though born in India, has spent years in America. So, there is less of a cultural gap to be overcome in reading "A New World".

If you're looking for action, suspense or romance, then stay away from this one. If, however, you're looking for a well written story of real people doing real things and having real emotions, then grab this one. The Editorial Reviews above tell you more than you need to know about the plot.

The only reason I did not give this book five stars is that there wasn't enough of it. He could easily have written another hundred pages without changing the first or last chapters. I did enjoy it enough to buy three more of his books.

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