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A Raisin in the Sun Mass Market Paperback – Nov 29 2004


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage; 1 edition (Nov. 29 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679755330
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679755333
  • Product Dimensions: 10.7 x 1.1 x 17.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 9 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (116 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #48,891 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

“A beautiful, lovable play. It is affectionately human, funny and touching. . . . A work of theatrical magic in which the usual barrier between audience and stage disappears.”
John Chapman, New York News

“An honest, intelligible, and moving experience.”
Walter Kerr, New York Herald Tribune

“Miss Hansberry has etched her characters with understanding, and told her story with dramatic impact. She has a keen sense of humor, an ear for accurate speech and compassion for people.”
Robert Coleman, New York Mirror

“A Raisin in the Sun has vigor as well as veracity.”
Brooks Atkinson, New York Times

“It is honest drama, catching up real people. . . . It will make you proud of human beings.”
Frank Aston, New York World-Telegram & Sun

“A wonderfully emotional evening.”
John McClain, New York Journal American

From the Back Cover

“A beautiful, lovable play. It is affectionately human, funny and touching. . . . A work of theatrical magic in which the usual barrier between audience and stage disappears.”
John Chapman, New York News

“An honest, intelligible, and moving experience.”
Walter Kerr, New York Herald Tribune

“Miss Hansberry has etched her characters with understanding, and told her story with dramatic impact. She has a keen sense of humor, an ear for accurate speech and compassion for people.”
Robert Coleman, New York Mirror

“A Raisin in the Sun has vigor as well as veracity.”
Brooks Atkinson, New York Times

“It is honest drama, catching up real people. . . . It will make you proud of human beings.”
Frank Aston, New York World-Telegram & Sun

“A wonderfully emotional evening.”
John McClain, New York Journal American
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
This play was also required of me on my 10th-grade English class. Boring, right? Not really. I found the story to be inspiring and emotional and the characters realistic, multi-faceted and down-to-earth. Beneatha's loftiness, spontaneity and charming flightiness reminded me very much of my younger sister, which enhanced the realism of the book. The character of Mama was someone I would have liked to meet in real life; simple and ignorant but conventionally wise and hardworking. The story dealt with both the characters' internal and external conflicts, conflicts with money, lovers and family, which in my mind made it very interesting reading. This book outlines a colorful premise on the life of an African American family and describes their fight for their dreams.

Schools have been using this play to get students reading and give them different perspectives. I think this book is for all. Some language...but it's not like no one has heard any badmouthing anyway. I think that it is just a really good play too and that Lorraine Hansberry did a good job just weaving everything together. You can really relate to this story with the dilemmas and questions it rises. And it's not like anything of a complicated story either, you can really decipher it. And last I believe the author wrote from her heart, expressing herself through her work majestically and with realistic emotion regarding the problems of the Younger family could easily have struck a lower middle class black family in the 1950's.

"A Raisin in the Sun" shows the importance of family values during times of racial discrimination. The book teaches us a lesson that nothing should come between family ties. It's definitely one of my favorite classic reads plus the film version featuring Sidney Poitier is great as well.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
The play A Raisin in the Sun takes its title from a line from the classic poem by Langston Hughes that I is called "A Dream Deferred." Appropriately enough, the play focuses on the deferred dreams of the Younger family, an African American family living in Chicago sometime after World War II. The family consists of Mama, Walter Lee Younger, his wife Ruth, his son Travis, and his sister Berneath. The whole family lives together in a small apartment. It is long been Mama dream to move into a house and she could finally make this a reality with the aid of insurance money from her deceased husband's policy. Walter Lee, however, wants to use the money to open up a liquor store because he is tired of working as an unrespected chauffer. Berneath--a college student--dreams of becoming a doctor and believes that some of the money should go to her schooling. Thus, although each family member believes that the money will fullfill their dreams, it actually just causes more conflicts. The ultimate theme of the play is that money itself cannot make your dreams come true. Dreams must be worked on in order for them to come true. Eventhough some dreams may never be realized, they never truely "die." Instead, they allows remain in the back of your mind ever if they will never actually be realized.
I found this play an enjoyable and quick read. To me, it was more appealing than plays of August Wilson, who wrote plays of a similar theme (Fences, The Piano Lesson). One good thing about the play is that although the Youngers are a black family, the theme of the play seems appealing to any audience since many families have had money problems and even more families have had dreams about life that they have struggled to fulfill.
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Format: Hardcover
"A Raisin In the Sun" was a recent part of the One book, One Chicago program, having not read the play since college, I had forgotten what a great work it is. That said it is impossible to write on the all the emotional levels that "Raisin" brings to the reader and/or audience member.
A struggling, African-American family strives to make it out of crowded Chicago Housing Project and to own their piece of American dream pie. Several of the characters in this extremely well written drama have their own dilemma to face: Ruth Younger, wife to Walter, must decide if she should have bring another baby to her already financially strapped family. Walter Younger, husband to Ruth, who has huge dreams and little means, of providing for his family. Beneatha Younger, sister to Walter, who is med student and dreams of being a doctor now questions her own life and culture. Finally, and most importantly, is Lena Younger (Mama) who is fighting to keep her family together after the death of her husband. The issue of assimilation of African heritage in American culture is still significant factor today and continues to be a struggle for many minorities in America as well. In my opinion, Raisin remains a fresh and relevant dramatic work for today and for many years to come.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Its incredible how this play, A Raisin in the Sun is capable of getting the reader's mind thinking of reality just as it has with mine. The way Lorraine Hansberry portrays the struggle those who live with colored skin vs. non-colored have gone through, maybe even right at this moment, establishes realization at the thought. The harsh racism being shown through this dramatic piece leaves a moral well said and awareness of cruel reality. In scene three, as Linder, the "Welcoming Committee" representative tries to explain his point, going out of his way to talk to the Younger family, he stammers out, "...It is a matter of people of Clybourne Park believing, rightly or wrong, as I say, that for the happiness of all concerned that our Negro families are happier when they live in their own communities" (Hansberry pg. 117-118). Although Linder lays the point down soft, the point he's tries to get out is so unreasonable and candid as someone out there might have relatively experienced. The fact of being a Negro family mustn't have anything to do with happiness of any American family. The color of a human being mustn't even be recognized as classifications in the first place. Going further along the lines, as Mama is being informed by Benetha, Walter, and Ruth of what the welcoming committee representative came for, Ruth comments, "Well - that's the way the crackers crumble" (Hansberry pg. 121). This derogatory statement, "cracker" towards Americans demonstrates that it's not only the Negros that receive the discrimination. A great deal of a hate bases somewhat equally on both sides resembling real-life situations. The veracity of hate in the world just needs to stop.
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