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ART OF DECEPTION, THE(LIBR.ED.)(10 CD'S) Audio CD – Audiobook, CD, Unabridged


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Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: BRILLIANCE AUDIO; Library edition (Aug. 6 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1590862279
  • ISBN-13: 978-1590862278
  • Product Dimensions: 17.1 x 16.8 x 2.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 336 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)


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First Sentence
She lay on her side, her head ringing, her hair damp and sticky. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Feb. 20 2003
Format: Hardcover
What a unintelligent shallow story. You got a lame incompetent female police forensic psychologist and a super
duper perfect cop doing/being stupid. That's it. My first R.Pearson, my last.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Feb. 4 2003
Format: Hardcover
Though he is one of my favorite mystery/thriller writers, Pearson's books usually do not show a strong grasp of romantic relations or of women, in my opinion. The romances generally feel cardboard and perfunctory, and the women characters are usually one-dimensional stick-figures, or else completely incoherent hodge-podges.
In this book, Pearson puts his greatest weaknesses front and center--Daphne emerges as a lead detective, and she and LaMoia develop a romantic relationship.
For Pearson, that move is a brave departure, but not so smart. Thius book puts his weaknesses on glaring display, in my opinion.
In this book, Daphne is presented as something of an emotional mess. She pronounces (and insists upon) a lot of psychological speculation, without any data or evidence to back it up, but she doesn't "detect" much. The book's romance between her and LaMoia could have been written by a mildly talented ninth grader, so deep is its insight and subtle its progression.
And the plot isn't great--you figure out whodunnit fairly early. The red herrings confuse the plot more than mislead the reader. And the resolution turns on lots of amazingly correct guesses and overly improbable clues. For instance, at one point, when she is being kidnapped, Daphne reaches into her underwear and rips out the tag, dropping it on the ground as a "crumb" to lead detectives to her. Not only is the tag spotted-amidst all the detritus of a city street in a bad part of town-- but LaMoia (a) recognizes the tag as Daphne's, though at this point he hasn't had occasion to see her intimate apparel (he's even amused to see the brand, for the first time, in the midst of this chase), and (b) realizes immediately that it means to go underground through a man hole! That's quite a feat of semiotics!
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By Gail Cooke TOP 50 REVIEWER on March 9 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Seattle police biggie Lou Boldt is trying to track a serial killer, while Daphne Matthews, gorgeous forensic psychologist is investigating the untimely demise of Mary Ann Walker who was thrown (?) jumped (?) from Aurora Bridge. A boyfriend, known for physically abusing Mary Ann, is a prime suspect.
Before we know it Pearson, always a master of surprises, connects the two cases by spotlighting one suspect. However, a solution is never that easy.
Along the way emotions are stirred as a member of Boldt's team finds himself drawn to Daphne, who once had a fling with Boldt. Add a mega underground chase scene through streets long buried beneath contemporary Seattle and you have a high octane finish.
Pure Pearson - pure pleasure.
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By tertius3 on Oct. 29 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Police psychologist (or "profiler") Daphne Mathews has a long history in these exciting Seattle stories, and with Police Lt. Boldt, her mentor, idol, and more. Here she finally takes front center stage, with Boldt usually far in the background, and that ain't good. One thing that becomes clear is that Daphne is not only a bold, if erroneous, profiler, but is personally a bundle of boiling insecurities and anxieties in all directions. Here she seems like a caricatured throwback to pre-feminist women who sterotypically fall apart under pressure. I found this offensive, and maddening because it's not clear why she's suddenly folded into gibbering paranoia. While she tries to deceive her prime suspect into revealing himself, he is tying her up in his own unsuspected web of masterful deceptions.
The authorial tactic of personally involving the hero in criminal attacks is a cheap way for an author to ratchet up tension in his story without the effort of creating another victim from whole cloth-but you also know he won't eliminate a central series character. This tactic also tends to turn a "good, clean" mystery into an hysterical horror story-the reason I don't read Patricia Cornwall's Kay Scarpetta series anymore. Sorry, you might not have the same dislike.
What's neat is that even with a suspect in hand early, there are more surprises. And Pearson has again researched obscure facts about the city of Seattle that provide vital sidelights. There are two suspects chased into a fascinating Underground historic city (who knew?)-but how Boldt decides between the two eerie suspects is still a mystery to me.
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By frumiousb on Oct. 10 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Art of Deception has all the elements which make for a great mystery/detective. The Seattle underground was actually really cool-- I was interested in the victims, it wasn't too bloody and it was really pretty well written.
Unfortunately, it never came together well as a novel for me. Partly this was due to Daphne as a lead detective. It got irritating that every man she ran across became irrationally obsessed with her, and I just plain old wasn't interested in the progression of her relationship with John.
Too bad, but I'll probably pick up another Pearson to see if it gets better.
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