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Aboriginal Plant Use in Canada's Northwest Boreal Forest [Paperback]

Robin Marles
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

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Book Description

May 1 2000
This handbook describes the traditional uses by aboriginal people of more than 200 different plants from Canada's boreal forest. It is the result of original ethnobotanical fieldwork in 29 communities across the boreal forest region of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta. Natural resources of the boreal forest have always been essential to the dietary, medical, economic, and spiritual well-being of First Nations people, but until now much of their traditional environmental knowledge has remained unrecorded and at risk of being lost.

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In addition to gathering botanical data, the original field research also gathered information on ritual uses of plants, the naming and classification of plants in the indigenous languages, beliefs regarding plants, and attitudes toward development of plant sources. -- Biology Digest

About the Author

Robin J. Marles is an Associate Professor and Chair of the Botany Department at Brandon University in Manitoba. He has been conducting research on the traditional uses, chemistry, pharmacology, and sustainable production of medicinal and edible plants for over 20 years. Christina Clavelle recently completed her Master's degree from the University of Saskatchewan Biology and Anthropology/Archaeology Departments. Leslie Monteleone is a graduate student in the University of Alberta Botany Department. Natalie Tays is a member of the Nisichawayasihk First Nation and a school teacher in Nelson House, Manitoba. Donna Burns is a member of the James Smith First Nation, James Smith 100 Reserve, Saskatchewan, and a former University of Saskatchewan student.

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Most helpful customer reviews
19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Spruce forest ethnobotany Sept. 23 2001
By Tami
Format:Hardcover
This is a compendium of data on plants from the boreal forest which are used for food, or medicine, or in a variety of ways for handicrafts (in the ample sense of the word). It fills a growing need for ethnobotanic scripture, when much knowledge is being lost because it is «old-fashioned». The data are presented in an easy-to-use format of one species per page (more-or-less), and cover the three aspects of use already mentioned, as well as the known names in Chipewyan, Cree, English, French, Latin, Ojibwe, and Slave. Anything known about chemical properties is also included. This is truly an in-depth compilation, and shows us that there is more in the forest than moss and spruce trees (and unsuspected uses even for these).
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Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  1 review
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Spruce forest ethnobotany Sept. 23 2001
By Tami - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
This is a compendium of data on plants from the boreal forest which are used for food, or medicine, or in a variety of ways for handicrafts (in the ample sense of the word). It fills a growing need for ethnobotanic scripture, when much knowledge is being lost because it is «old-fashioned». The data are presented in an easy-to-use format of one species per page (more-or-less), and cover the three aspects of use already mentioned, as well as the known names in Chipewyan, Cree, English, French, Latin, Ojibwe, and Slave. Anything known about chemical properties is also included. This is truly an in-depth compilation, and shows us that there is more in the forest than moss and spruce trees (and unsuspected uses even for these).
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