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Accessible XHTML and CSS Web Sites: Problem - Design - Solution [Paperback]

Jon Duckett

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Book Description

April 15 2005 Wrox Problem--Design--Solution
  • Shows Web developers how to make the transition from HTML to XHTML, an XML-based reformulation of HTML that offers greater design flexibility
  • Demonstrates how to work with CSS (Cascading Style Sheets)-now supported by ninety percent of browsers and integral to new site-building tools from Macromedia and others-and implement a consistent style throughout and entire site
  • Explains how to make a site accessible to people with impaired vision, limited hand use, dyslexia, and other issues-now a legal requirement for many sites in the U.S. and the U.K.

Product Details


Product Description

From the Back Cover

Accessible XHTML and CSS Web Sites

Problem - Design - Solution

This book teaches anyone who already knows about creating Web pages in HTML how to bring their skills up to date and take advantage of XHTML and CSS to create attractive sites that also meet accessibility laws and guidelines.

By looking at how to update an example site written in HTML, you will learn how the latest Web standards allow you to create Web pages that will last longer and work in more browsers. You'll be introduced to a series of common situations, explore possible solutions, and learn to implement the best choice.

First, you will learn how to write XHTML markup. Then, you will see how to control the presentation and layout of your pages using CSS. And finally, you will learn how to meet accessibility requirements.

What you will learn from this book

  • How to create Web pages in XHTML, which will help pages work on more browsers and give your pages a longer lifespan
  • How to control presentation of your pages with CSS
  • How to control the layout of a page using CSS rather than HTML tables
  • How to meet accessibility requirements set out in W3C WCAG and U.S. Government Section 508 guidelines

Who this book is for

This book is for anyone who already knows how to create Web pages in HTML and wants to keep up-to-date by learning about XHTML, CSS, and accessibility.

Wrox Problem – Design – Solution references give you solid, workable solutions to real-world development problems. Each is devoted to a single application, analyzing every problem, examining relevant design issues, and implementing the ideal solution.

About the Author

Jon Duckett published his first Web site in 1996 while studying for a BSc (Hons) in psychology at Brunel University, London. Since then he has helped create a wide variety of Web sites and has coauthored more than ten programming-related books on topics from ASP to XML (via many other letters of the alphabet) that have covered diverse aspects of Web programming, including design, architecture, and coding.
After graduating, Jon worked for Wrox Press, first in their Birmingham (U.K.) offices for three years and then in Sydney (Australia) for another year. He is now a freelance developer and consultant based in a leafy suburb of London, working for a range of clients spread across three continents.
When not stuck in front of a computer screen, Jon enjoys writing and listening to music.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
As the Web evolved, so did HTML. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
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Amazon.com: 3.5 out of 5 stars  4 reviews
25 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Eases the Transition June 5 2005
By John Matlock - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
OK, so you really know that you need to move on to Style Sheets and the new version of HTML. But you've put it off. The books on XHTML and CSS are long and tedious, and written for beginners so they contain a lot of fluff that you already know.

This book is different. It starts with the presumption that you are already an HTML programmer. In fact you are probably running a site that has a few hundred pages on line and you don't want to go redo the whole thing. This book starts with a fictional web site that uses good HTML 4.0 as was proper in the late 1990's. It's a typical site with lots of tables within tables as was the style of the day.

The first thing that he does is go re-write the HTML into XHTML, removing the commands that handle the style of the presentation. Going to XHMTL is a pretty straightford thing, but without the style aspects you have a pretty dull page.

Second he says let's use CSS to make the page pretty once again. Since you've seen the pages. And you've looked at the HTML that generated them, the task is a conversion, not a design the page problem. This probably matches your real problem a lot better than the way most books cover the subject.

Third is the first word in the title: Accessible. There are now laws coming into effect that say a web site should be accessible to people with various disabilities. What does this mean, and how must you think about page design to make the site accessible?

Finally there is a chapter on what's coming. The web is dynamic and the rules are still changing. This chapter covers the things that are being considered, designed, or discussed about in the committees that make the rules. This is what you will be having to learn next.
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Goes beyond and explains it all Jan. 25 2006
By Carlos - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book not only explains how to do write in XHTML and CSS but it tells you why the W3C has changed its standards and why you should write in these two recommendations. It gives you thoroughly explained examples, and explains it in different ways to make you sure that you get it in case you didn't the first time.

This is an easy book to read but it takes some time as it educates you about related topics that you might want to know about.

Not only do you get to learn XHTML and CSS but you also get to update a website the publisher provides to put your new skills to practice and make sure you get it in your head. It also makes a good reference book as it explains CSS properties in detail and their values.

Now adays accesibility is a key tool for websites and that's what you'll learn at the end of the book.

I recommend this book to anyone who already knows HTML and has written websites in HTML (if you dont, dont buy this book to start with) that is willing to take their skills to the next level.
1.0 out of 5 stars Not well informed May 30 2013
By Dlicious Designs - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
It's ok. But if I would have read the book for few pages before I bought it, I would have not bought it.
9 of 14 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Accesibility or not Nov. 25 2005
By BP NIGHTINGALE - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I think the author has done a good job in writing a book that highlights the issues of accessibility - an enormous topic. With eyesight being amongst comon 'issues' people have, the ability to magnify a page is important - guess what I need to be able to do?

Unfortunately, the finished site does not magnify without the page objects loosing there relative positioning to one another. This makes the page look like a scambled jig saw puzzle. I tested in Firefox 1 and the 1.5 beta version. IE 6 limits what you can do with magnification, so ive stopped using it. Opera magnifys beautifully.

I have tried raising the question as to whether this is an issue with the underlying code that the book promotes or is it a browser issue? No response (over a month at time of writing this) from publisher other than to confirm that the forum is 'live'.Really.

Im disappointed and can only rate as 3.
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