Quantity:1

Compare Offers on Amazon
Add to Cart
CDN$ 364.84
& FREE Shipping. Details
Sold by: Amazon.ca
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
      

Achtung Baby - 20th Anniversary Edition (Uber Deluxe Box Set) Box set, NTSC


Price: CDN$ 358.87 & FREE Shipping. Details
Only 3 left in stock.
Sold by Fulfillment Express CA and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
12 new from CDN$ 358.87 1 used from CDN$ 669.54

Artists to Watch
Artists to Watch
Be the first to hear about the hottest emerging artists. Featuring ten new artists each month, Artists to Watch will help you stay in the know when it comes to up-and-coming artists. See all of this month's picks

Frequently Bought Together

Achtung Baby - 20th Anniversary Edition (Uber Deluxe Box Set) + Songs of Innocence (Deluxe)
Price For Both: CDN$ 366.86


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details

  • Audio CD (Nov. 1 2011)
  • Number of Discs: 15
  • Format: Box set, NTSC
  • Label: Universal Music
  • ASIN: B005FVA63A
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (360 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #31,437 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

See all items

Product Description

Product Description

Extremely limited numbered Uber Deluxe Edition is a magnetic puzzle tiled box contains 10 discs (six CDs + four DVDs) including the original Achtung Baby album, the follow-up album, Zooropa, b-sides and re-workings of previously unheard material recorded during the Achtung Baby sessions. Four DVDs including "From The Sky Down", Zoo TV, all the videos from Achtung Baby plus five clear seven inch vinyl singles in their original sleeves, 16 art prints taken from the original album sleeve, an 84-page hardback book, a copy of Propaganda magazine, four badges, a sticker sheet, and a pair of Bono's trademark "The Fly" sunglasses. Band members sold separately.

Amazon.ca

Even though it was greeted at the time as U2's reinvention as a dance/rock post-modern revue, with a bit of post-Wall Berlin thrown in for luck, distance now shows that Achtung Baby is in fact a suite of extraordinarily perceptive and tender songs on the breakdown of the Edge's marriage. "Who's Gonna Ride Your Wild Horses", "The Fly", "One", "So Cruel"--it's as if Bono shuffled into the studio and said "Er, Edge. Was it a bit like this?" And the Edge wept until his hat became soggy. U2 fans will argue until the end of "Until The End Of The World" which is the best album in the band's exemplary canon, but with Bono sounding like a scorched St Paul, the Edge augmenting those electrified sheets of sound with deft funk-flicks and producer Brian Eno keeping it spacious, hot and holy, chances are, this is it. --Caitlin Moran --This text refers to an alternate Audio CD edition.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Itamar Katz on July 16 2004
Format: Audio CD
Many great bands achieve perfection on one album, a high point of epiphany and clarity that is so obvious that it can't be denied - though that band's avid fans often like to. Be it the Beatles' Sgt. Pepper, Floyd's Dark Side Of The Moon, Led Zeppelin's fourth album or Elton's Goodbye Yellow Brick Road - all of these albums transcend time and genre, and are immediately and eternally accepted as classics by almost everyone, far beyond the bands' fan base. That happened for a record number of artists in 1991 - perhaps the greatest year rock had since 1973. Guns n' Roses had their Use Your Illusion; Red Hot Chili Peppers had Blood Sugar Sex Magik; Nirvana scored with Nevermind, and the list goes on - Pearl Jam, Temple Of The Dog, Spin Doctors. And U2. U2 achieved perfection on Achtung Baby both in their songs and in their sound. Much of the thanks should go to the production team; Achtung is the last U2 album produced by Daniel Lanois, but Brian Eno's (the master-producer who worked with David Bowie, Talking Heads, Bryan Ferry, Robert Fripp and Devo, among others) influence is at its strongest here, and with the help of Mix-artist Flood (techno-wizard who helped Nine Inch Nails and Smashing Pumpkins to the top) he creates a new sound for U2, a sound that is rougher, harder and more electric, but also more captivating and more powerful than they ever were before. U2 dragged themselves kicking and screaming out of the 80s, emerged out of pop-rock and into the alternative and the avant-garde, and created an album that is at once catchy and groundbreaking.
From the very first sounds of the album's opening track, 'Zoo Station', it's clear that this will be a very different experience from The Joshua Tree or anything else they released before.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 23 2004
Format: Audio CD
Berlin, 1990. U2 are months removed from the end of the "Lovetown" tour, and they are struggling to figure out what to do, as the recording sessions for the untitled new project began. For the first time in their career, they were getting nowhere, and fast. Add this to the fact that there were massive disagreements about the creative direction they should take, and the fact that The Edge was going through a difficult split from his wife at the time, and you have one very tense, very uncertain atmosphere for these recording sessions. It was a breakdown of sorts, and U2 nearly broke up. Were it not for one song, they may have never released anything together again.
Fortunately, that song did come to be, and the rest is history, as it quickly led to U2 finding their groove and figuring out what they wanted to do. Achtung Baby was a much darker, much more techno and dance-oriented then anything they had ever done. Bono's lyrical fortes have always been politics and sexual innuendo, and after a decade of political music, this album is straight a love-sex-relationships-loss record, which is no surprise as The Edge was going through his own marital split at the time and Bono was also having some problems(which have since been resolved) concerning touring and being away from his family for so long. This record captures all the different ways love can manifest itself, and, in contrast, the different ways it can be lost. Highlights include chart hits 'Even Better Than The Real Thing', 'The Fly', and 'Mysterious Ways', live favorite "'ntil The End Of The World'(which has generated so amazing performances), unknown gems 'So Cruel', "'Ultraviolet', 'Acrobat', and 'Love Is Blindness'.
When one things "Achtung Baby", however, one thinks of one song.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Phenom Penn on Sept. 29 2005
Format: Audio CD
This album marks the big change in direction the band went through after Bono declared at a concert on December 31, 1989 that they had to go away and dream it all up again. It contains the legendary song ONE (which many believe to be their best ever), which came out of a crisis situation in which the band might have been close to breaking up.
Thank God that didn't happen!
This album is one of the best of all time, and deserves to be a part of your collection.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By O. Neale on March 25 2004
Format: Audio CD
Although not as good as Joshua Tree overall, this album contains songs of such brilliance that anything else on the album wouldn't matter. The first four songs are beyond belief. Zoo Station's riff and swirly textures, together with Bono's alien voice make it the perfect opener: more of a statement of intent than a song. But it's damn groovy!
'Even Better Than the Real Thing' has nothing wrong with it. At all. It's totally driven by Adam Clayton's bouncing bassline, most notably near the end of the song where Edge and Adam battle for supremacy, vying with Bono's urge to 'take me higher!'
'One' is the best song ever written, ever. It's the harder, more cynical version of 'With or Without You'; keeping Bono's voals restrained, which makes it even more moving than its predeccesor.
'Until The End of the World': At first I didn't find the song to be melodic. But listen to more than the vocals. Edge's guitar is the real point of this song. Just see it played live and you will agree with me. Once the guitar grabbed me, I know love the tune itself, and the lyrics - from Judas himself!
But then the album goes boring for a second: 'Who's Gonna Ride Your Wild Horses' is almost a spoof of the old U2. It's just too long and rambling. But 'So Cruel' is better: more of the new Bono, less of the old. To call it a work of art is somewhat over the top but it does grow on you if you let it (if you're not falling asleep, that is) and listen to it with headphones. But that's the case with all U2 songs.
'The Fly' rescues the album with an absolutely searing verse and a chorus like the island of calm in a crazy world. If you don't turn this up, you are crazy. It's divine.
'Mysterious Ways' follows suit like The Fly's naughty but sweet younger brother.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most recent customer reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback