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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Paperback – May 26 1994


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Dover Publications; New edition edition (May 26 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0486280616
  • ISBN-13: 978-0486280615
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 13.3 x 21.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 181 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,048 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From the Back Cover

Referring to Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, H. L. Mencken noted that his discovery of this classic American novel was "the most stupendous event of my whole life"; Ernest Hemingway declared that "all modern American literature stems from this one book," while T. S. Eliot called Huck "one of the permanent symbolic figures of fiction, not unworthy to take a place with Ulysses, Faust, Don Quixote, Don Juan, Hamlet."
The novel's preeminence derives from its wonderfully imaginative re-creation of boyhood adventures along the mighty Mississippi River, its inspired characterization, the author's remarkable ear for dialogue, and the book's understated development of serious underlying themes: "natural" man versus "civilized" society, the evils of slavery, the innate value and dignity of human beings, the stultifying effects of convention, and other topics. But most of all, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a wonderful story―filled with high adventure and unforgettable characters (including the great river itself)―that no one who has read it will ever forget.
Unabridged Dover (1994) republication of the text of the first American edition, published by Charles L. Webster and Company, New York, 1885. New introductory Note.

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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Jolley TOP 50 REVIEWER on May 5 2007
Format: Paperback
If there's any book out there that needs no introduction (or review, to be honest), it's Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Yet here I am reviewing it, anyway. I must admit (not without a fair share of embarrassment) that I just now got around to reading this American classic for the first time. I never had to read it in school, and to some degree I felt pretty familiar with the novel even without having read it -- that's just how popular and important Huckleberry Finn is to the social fabric of America.

Nowadays, with all the politically correct liberals having escaped their Berkeley zoo and run amuck all over the nation, many of our young people are told not to read this novel. In fact, legions of voices cry out for poor little Huck Finn, that beloved rascal of literature, to be banned from schools and libraries -- for the crime of using the n-word, a word commonly used by both blacks and whites up and down the Mississippi during Huck's time (not to mention numerous hip-hop artists of today). Turning a blind eye to the fact that Twain made the slave Jim a noble, human, easy-going fellow with his heart always in the right place (unlike Huck's other companions), the literary fascists contend that this novel is poison to the minds of youngsters. One can only imagine the reaction Mark Twain would have to the hysteria his book incites in liberals today (although he would certainly not be surprised, as he had to fight censorship of this book from the date of its publication).

One of the great ironies of the "Ban Huck Finn" brouhaha is the fact that young people will surely find this novel much more entertaining than the vast majority of other literary classics they are asked to read.
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Format: Paperback
I think it goes without saying that Mark Twain is a genius, as a man, humourist, and writer in general. The characters he created in 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer,' and more importantly, this book, are classics in literature. I loved this book so much - Twain's style is entrancing, and makes you forget at some points that you're actually reading a book. Reading 'Huckleberry Finn' is an experience, one that everyone should have.

It deals with everything American: the racial divide, the search for identity, the Actual and the Imaginary, the power of the individual over the many. The list could go on. Twain wrote a deceptively complex book, because children have loved it, and university students will continue to study it. It's a picaresque novel, a Bildungsroman, and more. I have heard about lots of controversy concerning racial language, but I stand firm in thinking that it's part of the journey, and should be there in order to adequately look at the world Twain has created.

The relationship between Huckleberry and Jim is really heart-warming: they're two outsiders trying to find their way in the world, and it's beautiful how they connect, and even more beautiful when Huck realizes just how unimportant race in defining a man. Jim is wise to more practical things (despite his superstitions), and it rubs off on his new friend as they drift down the Mississippi River.

If I can find any fault, it's this: the book goes on longer than it should. While it's nice that Jim is rescued in the end, and you get some kind of closure, I'm inclined to agree with Hemingway and other critics that it should have ended when he was handed over to the Phelps family. That is where Huckleberry's story really comes to a close - Tom Sawyer shouldn't have come back into the novel.

But that's minute. Read 'The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn'! It'll stay with you for a long time after you've done it.
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Format: Paperback
When I first read this book, I was so taken with it, that I read from chapter 18 through the end of the book in one night. I was up until 3:30 in the morning, reading ahead of my 11th grade assignment, and loving every minute along the way. later in college, when I studied the book more, closer, and with a more educated eye (whatever that means) my love for the book increased. Now, as a teacher myself, I look forward to having my students read this book and discussing it in class.
But now as for the title of my review:
I can't help feeling bad for people who think that this is not a good novel because "we don't talk like that anymore." Are we to abandon books that are no longer contemporary to ourselves? I also take issue with people who claim that this book is a racist tirade based upon the use of the word "nigger," or because the escape route Jim took was down the Mississippi instead of up river. While currently offensive, Mark Twain used the term as a literary fact that most, if not all young boys of the south spoke in such a manner. Once more, Jim explained why he was going South before he headed north. the simple fact is that if you are going to criticize a book, then you should read it. mark Twain said as much in his essay, "Fenimore Cooper's Literary Offenses."
From reading a number of the reviews of this book, I have come to the opinion that while many read the book, more than a few are refusing to give Twain credit for subtext and the use of allegory. One reviewer down the line says that the book is racist because Twain makes a young boy to be twice as smart as Jim. Upon closer reading, Twain is showing what Huck feels to be true. Huck only thinks that he is smarter.
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