Africans in Colonial Louisiana and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.

Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Start reading Africans in Colonial Louisiana on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Africans in Colonial Louisiana: The Development of Afro-Creole Culture in the Eighteenth-Century [Paperback]

Gwendolyn Midlo Hall
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

Available from these sellers.


Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition CDN $14.33  
Hardcover --  
Paperback --  

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details


Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars A must for LA African and FPOC genealogy Aug. 14 2003
Format:Hardcover
ok. Maybe I'm biased since I am a direct descendant of many of the African/FPOC families listed in the book. However, what Dr. Hall has done for Louisiana genealogy research is nothing short of miraculous.
I purchased this book several years ago in Natchitoches, LA while in college and have consulted it and Dr. Hall's online database faithfully since then. It has been instrumental in my being able to trace my direct and indirect family lines back into 17th century France and Western Africa.
I think this book is an absolute must for those who have a real interest in gaining insight into the Louisiana "peculiar institution" or who desire a good, solid, and well-researched social commentary and genealogical database.
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Setting The Record Straight June 14 2003
Format:Paperback
This book corrects the many lies that racist white Louisianians and their Creole of color sympathizers have been telling about the origins of all things Louisiana for decades. It reclaims Louisiana for the Africans, who were brought there as chattle property to build the buildings, cultivate the land, blacksmith the iron and ultimately create the culture.
As a descendant of Colonial Louisiana Africans, this book was the first to tell me that I am a descendant of the Bamana of Mali. It is one of the only books I have come across to describe in detail, the battles of Louisiana maroon leader Saint Juan Malo. It is one of the first to tell it like it is concerning the true relationship of the French and Africans of this bastard french colony & address the underlying factors of why it became an Afro-creole colony more so than anything else. Basically this book tells the unadulterated truth backed by facts. It doesn't, like so many other books about Louisiana, get caught up in the romance of the Creoles of color and there obsession with their white fathers. Instead it tells the story of their Senegambian mothers. And shows how the culture of these Africans is the foundation of what is now considered Louisiana Creole culture.
This book is a breath of fresh air to some one like myself who loathes the hundreds of books written about Louisiana that describes it as " a mixture of French, Spanish, and Indian cultures". Always omitting the fact of African influence due to the legacy of white supremacy inherent in the telling of US history. In most other books on the subject, Africans are merely slaves. In this book we are shown for what we are, the foundation of the culture. It will most definitely be a textbook in any course I teach on the subject.
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Pathbreaking Research July 31 2000
By Rod
Format:Paperback
Check out the front page article in the July 30 Sunday New York Times, headlined "Anonymous Louisiana Slaves Regain Identity," to fully appreciate the significance of the historical research embodied in this book.
Was this review helpful to you?
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
I had to read this book for a seminar class and was fascinated by it. It documents in much detail the history of colonial Louisiana putting West Africans squarely in the middle of that development. Midlo Hall uses sources from three countries, France, Spain and colonial Britain to document the African presence in Louisiana. She spends some time on the fact that most of the Africans brought to Louisiana were from the Senegambia region of West Africa. Consequently, the Africans brought with them their way of life and were able to exercise much of it in Louisiana. She notes the difference in French/Spanish colonization and the contribution of African language, food and cultural practices in Louisiana. It is well worth reading for it is a history book quite well written that would appeal to the general public. It is entertaining as well as informative.
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.9 out of 5 stars  8 reviews
37 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars HISTORY OF CONTRIBUTION OF WEST AFRICANS TO CULTURE IN LA Feb. 5 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I had to read this book for a seminar class and was fascinated by it. It documents in much detail the history of colonial Louisiana putting West Africans squarely in the middle of that development. Midlo Hall uses sources from three countries, France, Spain and colonial Britain to document the African presence in Louisiana. She spends some time on the fact that most of the Africans brought to Louisiana were from the Senegambia region of West Africa. Consequently, the Africans brought with them their way of life and were able to exercise much of it in Louisiana. She notes the difference in French/Spanish colonization and the contribution of African language, food and cultural practices in Louisiana. It is well worth reading for it is a history book quite well written that would appeal to the general public. It is entertaining as well as informative.
40 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Setting The Record Straight June 14 2003
By "marcel_diallo" - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book corrects the many lies that racist white Louisianians and their Creole of color sympathizers have been telling about the origins of all things Louisiana for decades. It reclaims Louisiana for the Africans, who were brought there as chattle property to build the buildings, cultivate the land, blacksmith the iron and ultimately create the culture.
As a descendant of Colonial Louisiana Africans, this book was the first to tell me that I am a descendant of the Bamana of Mali. It is one of the only books I have come across to describe in detail, the battles of Louisiana maroon leader Saint Juan Malo. It is one of the first to tell it like it is concerning the true relationship of the French and Africans of this bastard french colony & address the underlying factors of why it became an Afro-creole colony more so than anything else. Basically this book tells the unadulterated truth backed by facts. It doesn't, like so many other books about Louisiana, get caught up in the romance of the Creoles of color and there obsession with their white fathers. Instead it tells the story of their Senegambian mothers. And shows how the culture of these Africans is the foundation of what is now considered Louisiana Creole culture.
This book is a breath of fresh air to some one like myself who loathes the hundreds of books written about Louisiana that describes it as " a mixture of French, Spanish, and Indian cultures". Always omitting the fact of African influence due to the legacy of white supremacy inherent in the telling of US history. In most other books on the subject, Africans are merely slaves. In this book we are shown for what we are, the foundation of the culture. It will most definitely be a textbook in any course I teach on the subject.
20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must for LA African and FPOC genealogy Aug. 14 2003
By Heather in Houston - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
ok. Maybe I'm biased since I am a direct descendant of many of the African/FPOC families listed in the book. However, what Dr. Hall has done for Louisiana genealogy research is nothing short of miraculous.
I purchased this book several years ago in Natchitoches, LA while in college and have consulted it and Dr. Hall's online database faithfully since then. It has been instrumental in my being able to trace my direct and indirect family lines back into 17th century France and Western Africa.
I think this book is an absolute must for those who have a real interest in gaining insight into the Louisiana "peculiar institution" or who desire a good, solid, and well-researched social commentary and genealogical database.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Africans in Colonial Louisiana Dec 17 2011
By funner things - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I started Africans in Colonial LA because I was interested in learning more about the historty of the state after living in LA for several years and really enjoy New Orleans--don't need Mardi Gras to have a good time, but Mardi Gras is fun. This book is fascinating in its description of the early years of the French colony. The French apparently never planned to settle the delta area so few settlers arrived in the early days and a large number died from disease, starvation, and Indian attacks--something I didn't associate with LA. Like persons sent to Australia rather than be imprisoned in England, French criminals and others were sent to LA without concern about their survival. The goal of the French was protecting the entrance of the Mississippi River from English colonization so only maintained a small force with Indian allies to accomplish securing the delta and River. The French also did not another colony to compete with the West Indies so NO was really off the beaten path for ships. The book is so very interesting and well written and I haven't even gotten into slavery and settling NO. I did find that Africans skilled in growing rice were sent to LA to provide food for the starving colony. Early on then,the skills contributed by these enslaved people contributed to the growth of the colony, but at the terrible cost of freedom and separation from family, community and life. Just think, about a hundred years later, Benjamin January (Barbara Hambly) lived and worked in a thriving NO. LA was already becoming part of American history. Really liking this book!
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Creoles Are Who?! May 14 2009
By Big Sistah Patty - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This book has been on my book list for a while. I finally purchased it. I thought my money would not be wasted. I wasn't disappointed.

The folks who call themselves creoles who are they really? Ms. Hall answers this question quite nicely. The foundation of LA culture and society owe its heritage to the Africans, i.e. Bambara, Woloof, Yoruba, Mina, Chamba, etc. However, the Senegambians are the true foundation of LA culture. These Africans came directly from the continent, not the West Indies.

I give this book a 4.5 star rating. The reasons I could not give it a 5 star rating is for the following reason:

First, the author uses terms that I am sure the average reader isn't familiar, though her writing style is not laborious. I feel that she could have solved this minor, yet irritating issue, by simple including a glossary.

Secondly, I feel that that the last chapter was an add on for the Point Coupee and Louisiana folks. I did not feel that it tied in directly with the overall them of the book, and I found myself annoyed and barely able to complete the last chapter.

Otherwise, the book is very informative about Africans in colonial Louisiana and the development of Afro Creole culture. I know that this book will set a lot of myths on its head. I would highly encourage all LA folks, West Africans (Senegambimas), African Americans, the French and all others who have an interest in African Creole development and how the Spanish and French involvement played out. The term Creole has a very interesting history and the author educates us. The original Creoles of LA were the children and grand children of the native Africans where 2/3 came out of the Senegambia region i.e. Bambara, Wolof, etc. The following excerpt interested me greatly:

"By the nineteenth century, the mixed-blood creoles of Louisiana who acknowledged their African descent emphasized and took greatest pride in their French ancestry. They defined creole to mean racially mixed, enforced endogamous marriage among their own group, and distinguished themselves from and look down upon blacks and Anglo-Afro Americans, though their disdain stemmed from cultural as well as racial distinctions. A recent study indicates that in New Orleans during the 1970s, the designation "black" and "creole" were irreconcilable. These young Afro-New Orleaneans embraced a definition of creole that is racially rather than culturally defined, as well as being a-historical.

Edward Braithwaite, writing about Jamaica, defined creolization as a social cultural continuum radiating outward from the slave community and affecting the entire culture in varying degrees. This definition is relevant for the United States as well as for the Caribbean. It is especially significant for Louisiana, where the slave culture was early and thoroughly Africanized and the first generation of creole slaves grew up in stable, nuclear families composed of African mothers and fathers and Creole siblings."

Who were these first French settlers in Louisiana? This excerpts answers this question quite nicely:

"The French colonization of Louisiana became to a great extent a penal colonization. During 1717 and 1718, the sentences of prisoners who had been condemned to the galleys were commuted, and these prisoners were sent to Louisiana to work for three years. The prisoners were brought to the ports under heavy guard and chained aboard the ships. Also during this period, soldiers who had deserted, vagabonds, and person without means were placed upon lists of those to be deported to Louisiana. Some had been arrested for acts of violence, murders, debauchery, and drunkenness, but they were mostly beggars and vagabonds from Paris and all the provinces of France."

I highly recommend this book.
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews
ARRAY(0xb35c8048)

Look for similar items by category


Feedback