Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Day of Ahmed's Secret Hardcover – Jun 20 1991


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, Jun 20 1991
CDN$ 0.77

Join Amazon Student in Canada


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Orion Children's Books (an Imprint of The Orion Publishing Group Ltd ) (June 20 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0575050799
  • ISBN-13: 978-0575050792
  • Product Dimensions: 27 x 22.6 x 0.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 358 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Paperback
I came across this book at the Dearborn Arab-American Festival, the largest Arab festival in North America. And I'm so glad I did. Vivid illustrations, and an engrossing storyline. Heide reveals a very realistic Cairo street life, unknown to most Western adults, and here very easy for kids to relate to through the eyes of the young child, Ahmed. I smiled as I read and saw different scenes, like the rose-water man, remembering walking through Cairo and seeing those very people. The scenes are gritty- not white-washed; yet also very relationally connected, with people caring for each other and showing true hospitality- kareem- the hallmarks of Cairo life. This child isn't a terrorist; it's a young child; it's real life. When he finally reveals his secret, it's the joy of a child first learning to read, just like any Western or American child. But he's also truly Egyptian- he presents his name in Arabic.
After we read this, I and the children in the library learned to write our names in Arabic, and then we *had* to get some rosewater ice cream, in order to fully immerse ourselves in the book. If you can get ahold of it, I would highly recommend!
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By A Customer on June 16 1999
Format: Paperback
I love this book because it conveys better than any book I've seen the magic of the breakthrough to literacy. The excitement of this working class boy who will now embark upon a whole new world because he has the first tool captures a precious moment in every child's life - and all this is accomplished with a text and illustrations that are bright and alive.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 14 reviews
25 of 27 people found the following review helpful
Everything Has Its Time to Be Feb. 5 2000
By Henrietta R. C. Blyden - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
An especially beautiful and thought-provoking book. The story transports us to Cairo, Egypt, where we are invited to observe a day in the life of a young Egyptian boy who sells gas canisters to help his family, all the while, harboring a secret. A must read if you are interested in learning about other cultures, and about the lives of millions of children around the world. The authors capture the culture, a sense of the language (poetic), the spirit of the people, as well as their philosophy of life. We even get some idea of the geography and history of Egypt; and all of this in a children's book. This is truly an wholistic piece of work. The illustrator does a marvelous job of capturing the sights and colors of Cairo. I have been so impressed by this book as to have recommended it to countless students and teachers in the school system where I teach. I have even been moved to write and thank the authors, who graciously responded.

I would also highly recommend the authors' other two books in this trilogy of stories set in the Middle East: 'The House of Wisdom' set in ninth-century Baghdad, Iraq (poetic), and 'Sami and the Time of the Troubles' set in modern day Lebanon. [Read an interview with the authors in November 1999 issue of 'Book Links' magazine.]
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
It's a Keeper! June 16 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I love this book because it conveys better than any book I've seen the magic of the breakthrough to literacy. The excitement of this working class boy who will now embark upon a whole new world because he has the first tool captures a precious moment in every child's life - and all this is accomplished with a text and illustrations that are bright and alive.
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
BUY THIS BOOK!!! March 2 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Library Binding
I loved this book. it is amazing. the words are lovely, the plot enchanting, and the illustrations are superb. if you can avoid it, don't let anyone tell you ahmed's secret until you can read it for yourself. it's well worth reading the whole thing to find it.
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
A Very Real Child April 15 2002
By Jedidiah Palosaari - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I came across this book at the Dearborn Arab-American Festival, the largest Arab festival in North America. And I'm so glad I did. Vivid illustrations, and an engrossing storyline. Heide reveals a very realistic Cairo street life, unknown to most Western adults, and here very easy for kids to relate to through the eyes of the young child, Ahmed. I smiled as I read and saw different scenes, like the rose-water man, and remembered walking through Cairo and seeing these very people. The scenes are gritty- not white-washed, yet also very relationally connected, with people caring for each other and showing true hospitality, the hallmark of Egyptian life. This child isn't a terrorist; it's a young child; it's real life. When he finally reveals his secret, it's the joy of a child first learning to read, just like any Western or American child. But he's also truly Egyptian- he presents his name in Arabic.

After we read this, I and the children in the library learned to write our names in Arabic, and then we *had* to get some rosewater ice cream, in order to fully immerse ourselves in the book. If you can get ahold of it, I highly recommend!
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
An AWAIR Pick!!! May 15 2011
By AWAIR Reviews - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Lavishly illustrated. Throughout the bustling city of today's Cairo, young Ahmed rides his donkey cart, past buildings a thousand years old. The sights and sounds of the city fill the day, and when at last Ahmed hurries home, young readers will be excited to learn the secret Ahmed has been waiting to share with his family - he has learned to write his name!

Teachers/Librarians: wonderful for K - 6th grades. Those 5th and 6th graders would love seeing how their name looks written in the Arabic script. Ask an Arab parent or someone in your community to do this for your class, or send your class set of names (first names only) to this reviewer and I'll write them out, scan them and send them back to you. (Include your grade level and name/location of school please.)

Product Images from Customers

Search

Look for similar items by category


Feedback