CDN$ 18.17
  • List Price: CDN$ 28.99
  • You Save: CDN$ 10.82 (37%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Alan's War: The Memories ... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Alan's War: The Memories of G.I. Alan Cope Paperback – Oct 28 2008


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 18.17
CDN$ 10.75 CDN$ 9.23

Amazon.ca: Spring 2015 Books Preview
CDN$ 18.17 FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.



Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: First Second; 1 edition (Oct. 28 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1596430966
  • ISBN-13: 978-1596430969
  • Product Dimensions: 16 x 2.6 x 23.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 640 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #297,426 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Guibert writes and draws for American G.I. Alan Cope in this poignant and frank graphic memoir of young soldier who was told to serve his country in WWII and how it changed him forever. When he first enters Fort Knox at 18, he is young and impressionable, more of a dreamer than the military type. Slowly, Cope grows through his experiences in the war. He forges candid friendships with his fellow soldiers and remains ever insightful in his recollections of the war and his life afterward. Together, Cope and Guibert forge a story that resonates with humanity. Guibert's illustrations capture the time period vividly. While the subject matter is familiar from many wartime memoirs, Guibert's fluid, simple but assured linework captures the personalities of Cope and his friends, elevating the material to a far more affecting level. (Oct.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

Guibert writes and draws for American G.I. Alan Cope in this poignant and frank graphic memoir of a young soldier who was told to serve his country in WWII and how it changed him forever. When he first enters Fort Knox at 18, he is young and impressionable, more of a dreamer than "the military type." Slowly, Cope grows through his experiences in the war. He forges candid friendships with his fellow soldiers and remains ever insightful in his recollections of the war and his life afterward. Together, Cope and Guibert forge a story that resonates with humanity. Guibert's illustrations capture the time period vividly. While the subject matter is familiar from many wartime memoirs, Guibert's fluid, simple but assured linework captures the personalities of Cope and his friends, elevating the material to a far more affecting level. (Publisher’s Weekly, Starred Review)

After churning out a series of popular children's books, French graphic artist Guibert recently detoured into biography. His chronicle of reporter Didier Lefevre in Afghanistan, The Photographer (in three volumes, so far), won several awards and raised the bar for Guibert's versatile drawing skills. The unlikely subject of his latest biography is World War II veteran Alan Cope, an American retiree living in France, with whom Guibert developed a close friendship in the early 1990s. Cope's charismatic demeanor and storytelling penchant gradually put a spell on Guibert, inspiring him to capture Cope's life in a fascinating tapestry of illustrated anecdotes, reproduced letters, and photographs. Cope, it turns out, saw very little action during his extended European tour in the latter half of the war, yet his peculiar misadventures as a radio operator, tank gunner, and chaplain's assistant carry their own appeal. His encounters with temperamental officers, friendships with fellow soldiers and German musicians, and struggles to find work in post-war France reveal a fascinating side of wartime life rarely seen in military films or history books. (Carl Hays Booklist)

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By S. Baptist on Dec 14 2009
Format: Paperback
I enjoyed reading Alan's War as I found it to hit home regarding the reality of war. Meaning, we all want to be the hero but actually not having fired a shot is probably closer to the mark on how we would actually hope it went.

Then again, maybe I'm just a bit too much of an idler and this is why I liked Alan's War
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Nicola Mansfield HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Jan. 17 2015
Format: Paperback
This is the story of one man's war. It is not the story of WWII, but the story of one man (Alan Cope) and his personal day to day life as he lived through those years in France. Alan didn't fight in any famous battles or according to himself, show any acts of bravery. His war could be called mundane, but no one can go through fighting and surviving a world war without having tales to tell and these are Alan's tales in his own words illustrated by Emmanuel Guibert. The book was good and I enjoyed my time with it. There are a few things that made it not a five-star read for me. It drags a bit, being overly long. Guibert doesn't do as much of his photograph/illustration mixture artwork for a good portion of the book, which I can understand because of the lack of photos taken during the actual combat years, but still I felt their absence. Finally, I simply didn't like Alan. I had a small inking after reading the story of his childhood that as an adult he might rub me the wrong way, and this book certainly confirmed that. I didn't like his worldview, outlook, or opinions. So that does take away from the enjoyment of reading the minutia of his life. But all told I did like this quiet, personal look at one man's war.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Robert Alder on Dec 27 2010
Format: Paperback
The finest graphic novel I have read. This is a story about life as it should be lived. Alan Cope flows through his life encountering and connecting with anyone he can in a way that is graceful, respectful, kind, and natural. I can't express how beautiful this book was to read.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
0 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Kirk R. Jones on Oct. 2 2009
Format: Paperback
This is beautifully drawn and well written story. The problem is it is not all that interesting. The protagonist joins the army but never hears a shot fired in anger. His post war life would be fascinating if you met him at a dinner party but does not have the weight to carry a graphic novel.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 22 reviews
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
Stirring Memoirs... Oct. 28 2008
By Tim Lasiuta - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
As modern day North americans, we cannot appreciate the experiences soldiers had. Even with our technically superior computer generated, the memories and emotions that real soldiers lived through cannot be equalled.

Alan Cope and Emmanuel Guibert met by happenstance, and the collaboration that resulted is marvelous. Alan Cope tells us through Emmanuels' art his life as a soldier. Drafted at age 18, he joined the army to fight a guy named Adolph. His travels through France, Switzerland, Germany, California, and all points Europe are fascinating. This book is his journal, rendered in charming art that brings to life significant events and people that changed him from naive youth to wisened veteran.

It is clear that war changes people. While there are no atheists in foxholes, after the experience can turn believers into atheists or scar them forever. Alan was changed. His friends Gerhart and Vera were changed. Jako was changed. Landis changed. In the end, each went on with their lives based on their previous experiences.

As a reader, I was entranced by the simple narrative tone of the book. It was almost like Private Alan Cope was right beside me as I lived his life from training to his final years. While we could not smell the smells of the Alps as he hiked on Sundays, or the fresh dew of the French countryside,or the smell of German cooking, we can feel the effect on Alan. We cannot feel the horror of war, or the physcial exhaustion his training, the pain at losing friends, but we can feel the effect on Alan.

One thing about this book that I loved was the sheer variety of 'famous' people that Alan (or his close friends) knew. I also loved the depth of his relationships with his fellow soldiers, and his determined effort to not let his friendships die. One thing is very clear, Emmanuel's friendship is echoed in this book.

Reading this volume, I almost feel myself reaching over and pouring Alan a snifter of brandy and listening spellbound as the evening sun falls.

Thank you Emannauel and Alan for sharing this deep friendship with us.

Www.firstsecondbooks.com

Tim Lasiuta
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Guibert's illustrations shine through with startling clarity in black and white. Cope's stories deserve no less. Nov. 17 2008
By Bookreporter - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Memory is a tricky thing. Decades later, looking back at a time when you were young, in a foreign land and under fire, you can be forgiven if you mistake a few things. In the case of Alan Cope, former U.S. soldier in World War II, there are only a few stumbling blocks in his recollections, but illustrator Emmanuel Guibert has wisely left them intact in ALAN'S WAR. They are few and far between, it seems, and they only serve to render Alan's story all the more human.

To provide just a short background: Guibert met Cope in the mid-'90s by chance, when Guibert asked him for directions. A native of France, Guibert was intrigued by Cope, an American expatriate now living in France. Cope was born in a coastal town in California and drafted into the war immediately after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. He did his job, like millions of other men in the greatest generation, and saw the world. He did so without fanfare, and some 50 years later, he still didn't expect any. Cope passed away in 1999, but over their five-year friendship, Cope shared many of his war stories with Guibert, a talented artist who would draw those stories under Cope's guidance. The stories were printed in France, where they were warmly received. Now they've been released here in the United States.

Cope, despite being incredibly open in the sharing of his war stories, was nonetheless a very private man, and Guibert respects that. He recorded their conversations and uses Cope's own words to narrate ALAN'S WAR. It makes it even more personal and renders this long-ago era even more immediate to see Cope's words on the page. There's an innocence at the beginning of the book that speaks to the nature of the world at the time, yet there's also a universality to what Cope experiences that translates through the decades.

When Cope and his fellow draftees miss their train to boot camp, they know they're in trouble. So they decide to enjoy their remaining time by seeing the sights of New York City. In another book, it would almost be a throwaway tale, not worthy of remembering or spotlighting. Here, it becomes a tender look at the playfulness of boys headed off to war, not knowing which, if any, of them would survive the experience.

Cope was an interesting man, and the years that passed since the war did not dull his insight. He kept a soft-spoken viewpoint that allowed him to modestly and subtly detail the friendships he developed and the brutal experiences he endured without ever dwelling in sentimentality. That was his rare gift as a storyteller, and Guibert's knowing move to leave it intact. Better still, Guibert's illustrations shine through with startling clarity in black and white. Cope's stories deserve no less.

--- Reviewed by John Hogan
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Synergy of Prose and Pictures March 9 2009
By Bumpkin Boy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
So good it seems effortless. Exactly what I hope for from all graphic novels, but rarely get....blending a story that keeps you guessing with multiple sub-themes that let the reader enter into a fully dimensional universe, guided without being force-fed by the author. Beautiful clean lines, use of photo-montage to evoke the feel of the times. A true graphic "novel" - all the depth and strength of a well-written story with the added dimension of picture storytelling meshed so well with the words, it's hard to imagine one without the other. I can't wait for the sequel!
a ground-breaking graphic novel May 14 2012
By R. A. Frauenglas - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is yet another ground-breaking graphic novel. The father of the graphic novel, Will Eisner, & his most well-known protege, Art Spiegelman; would both be thrilled with the evolution of their works into some of what is being published today. Emmanuel Guibert, Posy Simmonds, Anders Nilsen, & Dash Shaw have made Eisner & Spiegelman quite proud. These four have published some of the most innovative graphic novels in just the past few years.
The lengths of these books in quite unique, with three of them containing well over 300 pages. The artwork ranges from minimal to quite realistic. The stories & plots are similar to those found in serious thick literary novels.
In this book, Guibert, uses the more traditional comic cell approach but adds longer narratives, differently shaped cells, & even reproduces actual photographs throughout the novel. The back of the book includes 26 black pages with photos printed onto them. These pages reminded me of the old photo albums my parents used to keep & the photo albums which Alan Cope would have kept.
The story of how this book came about is quite interesting all by itself. In June 1994, Parisian Emmanuel Guibert, was visiting a small island off the Atlantic coast of France. He stopped a man in the small village to ask for directions. That small incident birthed this 300+ page opus. At the time of that first innocent, by chance meeting; Guibert was just 30 & Alan Cope was 69. While Cope's French was excellent & nuanced, Guibert learned that he was in fact an American ex-patriate. Cope had moved to France in the post-WWII years & had never returned to the USA.
This pair gravitated to each other on that small island. Soon, they were sharing walks & visits. It turned out that Cope was a born story-teller. In Guibert, he found his Boswell. Conversely, Guibert had found his Samuel Johnson. Guibert was both an artist & a writer. He proposed that the two of them collaborate on some books, with Cope telling him stories & he'd illustrate them. Sadly, their friendship lasted only a bit over five years. Cope died on August 16, 1999. But, in those short years, the two met often & became the closest of friends.
This book is the first result of that friendship & collaboration to see publication in the USA. It marks the first return to the USA of Alan Cope, since he left in 1948. It was originally published in France in three parts: La Guerre d'Alan 1 (2000), La Guerre d'Alan 2 (2002), & La Guerre d'Alan 3 (2008). Pulver had a yeoman-like job of translating Alan's colloquial & nuanced French back into his native American-English.
This book tells the story of one lone American G.I. It covers his basic training right through to the end of WWII, his brief return to the USA, & his decision to leave the States & move back to Europe. Cope spent the years from 1948 until his death in 1999, living & working in France & Germany. When he retired, he remained in France.
The memories are all Alan's. He doesn't boast or puff himself up. He even belittles the Purple Heart he earned. Cope was an ordinary soldier. He didn't stand out like an Audie Murphy or a Sgt. York (WWI hero). He didn't take part in any heroic battles; such as Iwo Jima or the Battle of the Bulge. He landed in Normandy, after D-Day. His claim to fame was that he was attached to a small part of Patton's Army which was assigned to speed eastward as fast as they could, skirting major roads & battles, in order to reach Prague before the Russians.
Patton seemed to have a fortune teller's skill of seeing the future of the Cold War. He wanted American troops to liberate Europe as far eastward as they could go, because he knew lines of influence would be drawn. He was right. But, his advance troops, Cope among them, were in the end ordered to retreat from their forward positions & give them over to the Russians. This race to the east is told in simple unboasting language & was a unique chapter in WWII.
Cope remembers liberating villages & the welcome the Americans received. The main glaring omission in this huge 300+ page volume is almost any mention of the The Holocaust, of the Shoah. How could this be? Was this the norm for most American G.I.'s? Another disturbing part of this book are the incidents in which Cope befriended Germans immediately after the war. He even thinks some may have been Nazis & writes about one family he befriended getting ready to move to Argentina, the home of many Nazis after WWII. Yet, Cope appears to have just been a naive young American boy thrust into manhood & craving friendship & experience.
Guibert also writes of Cope's post-war years. His failed marriages. His friendships. His post-war jobs. Mainly, these are all add-ons to the real meat of this book: Cope's war-time experiences.
Sadly, Cope died less than one year before the first part of this book was published in France.
One Man's War Jan. 17 2015
By Nicola Mansfield - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is the story of one man's war. It is not the story of WWII, but the story of one man (Alan Cope) and his personal day to day life as he lived through those years in France. Alan didn't fight in any famous battles or according to himself, show any acts of bravery. His war could be called mundane, but no one can go through fighting and surviving a world war without having tales to tell and these are Alan's tales in his own words illustrated by Emmanuel Guibert. The book was good and I enjoyed my time with it. There are a few things that made it not a five-star read for me. It drags a bit, being overly long. Guibert doesn't do as much of his photograph/illustration mixture artwork for a good portion of the book, which I can understand because of the lack of photos taken during the actual combat years, but still I felt their absence. Finally, I simply didn't like Alan. I had a small inking after reading the story of his childhood that as an adult he might rub me the wrong way, and this book certainly confirmed that. I didn't like his worldview, outlook, or opinions. So that does take away from the enjoyment of reading the minutia of his life. But all told I did like this quiet, personal look at one man's war.


Feedback