Alexander the Great and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Alexander the Great Paperback – Oct 5 2004


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, Oct 5 2004
CDN$ 2.52 CDN$ 0.01

Join Amazon Student in Canada



Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 576 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books (Oct. 5 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0143035134
  • ISBN-13: 978-0143035138
  • Product Dimensions: 21.5 x 13.9 x 2.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 544 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #209,551 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Two thousand three hundred yean ago, in the autumn of 336 B.C., the king of the Macedonians was celebrating another royal wedding. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
14
4 star
4
3 star
3
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 21 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Balanced and thorough telling that captures effectively the greatness of King Alexander. Fox offers context effectively to capture the novelty of Alexander's actions.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
In my view, Lane Fox’s book on Alexander is the finest in the field (followed by the works of Tarn and Hamilton). Reconstructing any ancient hero is always a daunting task and Lane Fox himself writes, ‘It is a naïve belief that the distant past can be recovered from written texts, but even the written evidence is scarce and often peculiar’, yet I find his picture of Alexander very sensible and convincing.
From the modern perspective Tarn can be criticized on many counts but among the writers on Alexander - Griffith, Hammond, Badian, Wilcken, Schackermeyr, Green, Engels, Bosworth - he stands as the tallest due to his deep understanding of both the West and the East. Lane Fox’s scholarship is an extension of Tarn’s and even though he is not aware of many hard facts about Palibothra, Chandragupta, or the rewriting of the altars by Asoka, his intuition carries him through. Lane Fox takes great care while addressing Indo-Iranian history and religion and a fine sense of balance prevails throughout the book. Although the discovery of Alexander's altars...dramatically changes the scenario his evaluation of Alexander still remains valid.
In the New York Review of Books Lane Fox was once harshly reprehended by Badian as having all the qualities of an Etonian aristocrat who missed the true Alexander but this can be brushed aside as a harmless fib. He was the Gardening correspondent of the Times and probably this has added that hidden dimension to his Alexander – something absent in all other works. In a sense Alexander’s breach with his compatriots had something to do with a garden (probably in Seistan) where our ancestors opted for knowledge in preference to perpetual happiness.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By JLind555 on Dec 18 2003
Format: Paperback
Robin Lane Fox was only 27 when he wrote his biography of Alexander, but it's twice as good as many Alexander biographies written by authors who were twice Fox's age. Fox was a very young Oxford don when he researched and wrote this book, and his immaturity shows in a few spots when he makes assertions that seem to be based on "because I said so". But overall, it's a very, very well-researched and well-written biography that presents Alexander in a balanced light, being neither hagiography nor hatchet-job. It should be mentioned here that Fox's speculation that Philip's murder was probably masterminded by his wife Olympias was not original; it's specifically outlined in Mary Renault's "Fire From Heaven" and Renault is mentioned more than once as a resource in Fox's biography. (One might wonder why a biographer would list a historical novelist as a resource, but Renault scrupulously researched her own novels for historical accuracy before she published them.) The one jarring note in this book is Fox's substituting modern place names for historical names; it may be easier to look them up on a map but unless you already know that Ekbatana is the modern-day Hamadan, it gets a tad confusing. However, this is a minor cavil. Fox writes extremely well; his style carries you right along in the narrative, and there are voluminous footnotes for reference at the end of the book. One comes away somewhat awed that someone so young could have written such an excellent biography on one of history's most towering figures.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Bartus on July 4 2002
Format: Paperback
This book is insanely great. The author was shockingly young when he wrote it, but then, that's in keeping with Alexander himself. The author is so detailed and so knowledgeable, it's hard to believe anyone under 40 could have read so much. If you're into the period, Robin Lane Fox goes into marvellous detail on many fascinating points, most of which are glossed over by other authors. I wish someone had just told me to read this book and skip the others. The original works by Arrian and Plutarch only really make sense in the context of a work like Fox's.
In addition, Fox isn't scared to make a few conjectures - like the one that Alexander's mother was likely the one behind his father's murder. Now that you look at it, it sort of makes sense, but the thought never would have occurred to me.
I'm sure the book drives hardcore Alexanderologists (or whatever they call themselves) insane because of these conjectures, but it allows Fox to bring the man to life in a way no other author has - especially keeping in mind that no commentary direct from authors in Alexander's lifetime exists (quite like Christ, a point Fox doesn't fail to mention).
I just wish I could read it again for the first time!
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By A reader on July 6 2004
Format: Paperback
R.L. Fox does a wonderful job of weaving his story of Alexander with a mix of interesting anecdotes, balanced intepretations and a critical weighing of classical literature and accounts of Alexander's life. There are few people who have so long held the Western imagination as Alexander and there has been left a myriad of references, biographies, opinions and pamphlets written about him for the past 2300 years. With so much fact and fiction, Fox deftly guides the reader not only through his childhood and conquests, but also briefly outlines some of the major conflicts in the literature and speculation about Alexander's character and major decisions.
Fox is equally apt to the task of describing the world, both mythological and political into which Alexander would enter upon following his first footsteps at Troy, giving a solid background to readers who may only have a basic familiarity to the classical world.
Fox's gift of description and mellifluousness ties into this book's most glaring weakness, which is perhaps more the fault of its publisher - the lack of maps and their poor formatting. Much of Alexander's feats in Iran and the Punjab are left to the imagination. Countless rivers, cities, place names and engagements that are described with such detail have no secondary visual representation. Some maps also use a topographical shading format which seems to be most effective in obscuring place names that occupy the same space.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Product Images from Customers

Most recent customer reviews

Search


Feedback