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Alias Grace Paperback – Nov 1 1997


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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Anchor Books (November 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385490917
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385490917
  • Shipping Weight: 367 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (123 customer reviews)


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By IRA Ross on Feb. 12 2002
Format: Paperback
A sizable part of _Alias Grace_ is based on Susana Moodie's mid-19th century book about Grace Marks, who was convicted along with fellow servant, James McDermott, for the murders of Thomas Kinnear, and his housekeeper and mistress, Nancy Montgomery. Moodie met Grace Marks while the former was visiting the insane asylum and then the penitentary where Marks was later incarcerated. McDermott was hanged for his part in the murders; Marks was also condemned to die in the same manner, but her sentence was commuted to life in prison through the efforts of her attorney and of private citizens' groups who believed in her innocence. Much of Grace Marks' story is told by her, through a series of post-conviction interviews with Dr. Simon Jordan, a medical doctor who was a pioneer in the enlightened treatment of the mentally ill. Dr. Jordan is sponsored by a Reverend Verringer, who heads one of these groups.
What makes Margaret Atwood's novel so compelling is that much of what happens in _Alias Grace_ is based on true accounts of Grace Marks' life, which is seamlessly and expertly adapted by Ms. Atwood. She readily admits in her afterword "where hints and outright gaps exist in the record, I felt free to invent." Ms. Atwood is a master storyteller. Her Grace Marks is very much a three-dimensional, flesh and blood 19th century woman. The public's beliefs about her parallel many of the widely held views of females of her time. While many imagined Marks to be weak and easily led astray by a stronger and more wiley older man (Marks was only 16 at the time of the murders), others saw Marks as an evil and jealous temptress who entrapped a gullible man into the killings.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By lazza on July 30 2001
Format: Paperback
'Alias Grace' has long been recommended to me but I only just read it because the story, a piece of historical fiction of a 1840s Canadian murderess, didn't sound particularly appealing. Well my only regret is not having read the book sooner.
The story itself, on face value, is rather ordinary. Teenage girl and apparent boyfriend both kill their employers. However the girl ('Grace') is enigmatic and, as such, her actual guilt is brought into question. All this is explained very early in the novel. But then Atwood does a wonderful job of going into the mind and soul of our poor Grace; we are intrigued, disgusted, and feel compassion for this strange creature. The author then deftly reveals, in minute stages, what the real Grace is all about. The results are unexpected.
Oh, and Ms Atwood is a brilliant writer. Her prose is superb, to the point where you wonder if she can write a bad sentence.
Bottom line: among Atwood's best. A must read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer Christol on May 7 2001
Format: Paperback
Margaret Atwood's use of the quilt motif in Alias Grace serves not only a symbolic purpose, but also parallels lead character Grace Mark's revelation of her forgotten past and Atwood's structure of the novel.
In the beginning of the novel, the reader discovers that Grace has been convicted for involvement in the murders of her former employer, Thomas Kinnear, and his housekeeper and mistress, Nancy Montgomery. Now serving a life sentence, Grace claims to have no recollection of the murders. Some people believe her innocent, while some people believe her evil or insane. However, as an up and coming expert in the field of Psychology, Dr. Simon Jordan is determined to uncover the truth. Throughout her sessions, Grace discusses various quilt patterns which Atwood uses as symbols. One pattern in particular Grace claims to be her favorite, "The Tree of Paradise". This quilt pattern serves as the symbol of her dreams and goals, for as long as she is a prisoner, she must only sew what she is told. Her perception of the quilt changes throughout the novel, however. Toward the beginning, Grace desires "the vine border", symbolic of the vine which grew out of Thomas Kinnear's grave, whom she secretly loved. Yet, toward the end of the novel, Grace borders the Tree of Paradise with snakes appearing as vines which represent the serpent in the Garden of Eden, much like her love for Kinnear that inspired her participation in the murders. Furthermore, as Grace serves as a dramatic character throughout the novel, her perception of good and evil is changed.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By goodperson on May 3 2001
Format: Paperback
Margaret Atwood flavors Alias Grace with biblical allusions to make Grace Marks seem that much more substantial as a human being. The first introduction to Dr. Simon Jordan has Ms. Atwood adding in the Book of Job. When the doctor purposefully mentions "what Satan says to God" in the Book of Job, Grace realizes that the doctor has come to test her, and Atwood's biblical reference compares Dr. Johnson's test of Grace to one administered by God. Dr. Johnson further continues his embodiment of God by bringing her an apple which Grace clearly sees as "the apple of the Tree of Knowledge" so now Ms. Atwood has sprinkled in aspects of God's ultimate test. These indirect comparisons of Grace to Job and Eve obviously gives the reader a slightly new outlook on her. Grace's dream also has a biblical theme in it with "the pale horse that will be sent at the Day of Reckoning" and "the angels whose white robes were washed in blood , as it says in the end of the Bible". With such a morbid and overpowering biblical image of the Day of Reckoning diced into Grace's dream, Ms. Atwood makes the reader taste that Grace Marks can hardly qualify as just a normal person and that levels of complexity surround her. In the closing, Atwood again brings up the Tree of Paradise and dashes it in with the quilt motif that runs throughout the book. The quilt motif simply stands for the patchwork way in which Grace remembers things, one square at a time. This ties up with the Tree of Paradise with Grace making a quilt and "the pattern of this quilt is called the Tree of Paradise", and it serves the purpose of making the quilt seem sacrilegious and so making Grace's memory seem holy as well. While the reader may first think of Grace Marks as simply some loon because of the fact that she gets put in an insane asylum, Ms. Atwood quickly begins to develop an identity that makes her more important as a character by adding in a touch of God.
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