CDN$ 14.43
  • List Price: CDN$ 19.99
  • You Save: CDN$ 5.56 (28%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

All Aboard!: Elijah McCoy's Steam Engine Hardcover – Aug 10 2010


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 14.43
CDN$ 9.98 CDN$ 0.01

Best Canadian Books of 2014
Margaret Atwood's stunning new collection of stories, Stone Mattress, is our #1 Canadian pick for 2014. See all

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought



Hero Quick Promo
Boxing Day Kindle Deals
Load your library with over 30 popular fiction books and more, today only. Learn more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Tundra Books (Aug. 10 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0887769454
  • ISBN-13: 978-0887769450
  • Product Dimensions: 21.5 x 0.9 x 26.2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 358 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #522,856 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"When I read Monica Kulling's retelling of the life of Elijah McCoy I felt the same sense of wonder and curiosity that I first experienced when I was initially introduced to this enigmatic, inventive, and charismatic figure. Bill Slavin's images are absolutely beautiful. My daughters LOVE it."
Andrew Moodie, author of The Real McCoy

“an engaging biography of the African-American inventor . . . The narrative includes fictionalized dialogue and clear explanations about how the machinery works and concludes with an inspiring message . . .” 
— School Library Journal

About the Author

MONICA KULLING was born in Vancouver, British Columbia. A poet, she has also published many books for children. Best known for her clear and engaging biographies, she has tackled subjects ranging from Harriet Tubman and Eleanor Roosevelt to Harry Houdini. Her book It's A Snap! George Eastman's First Photo, illustrated by Bill Slavin, was the first in Tundra's Great Idea Series. Monica Kulling lives in Toronto.

BILL SLAVIN has garnered many awards for the over seventy books for children he has illustrated, including The Big Book of Canada by Christopher Moore and The Library Book: The Story of Libraries from Camels to Computers by Maureen Sawa. Among his many honors, he has won the Amelia Frances Howard-Gibbon Illustrator's Award, and The Blue Spruce Children's Choice Award.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Nicola Mansfield HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Sept. 15 2010
Format: Hardcover
Reason for Reading: Taking my turn before handing it over for a bedtime read to my son, who is very much into inventors right now.

Lovely little first biography for picture book age children or older struggling readers who still like their books filled with illustrations. Of course, Elijah's life is told briefly and rapidly but it manages to hit upon all the major events of his life leading up to the invention of his oil cup which revolutionized steam travel. Not only do we get the facts of this young man's life, we also get insight into the era and the treatment of Blacks in the US and child labour in general. Canadian born Elijah, educated in Scotland, returned to his family now living back in the US, first meets up with a white man's disdain and ignorance as he tries to get a job designing train engines and ends up being an ashcat, the person who feeds the coal into the engine. Along with him is a small white boy, his "grease monkey" who keeps all the parts well oiled climbing under and over the engine in a dangerous job. These injustices though are what keep Elijah up at nights trying to figure out a way to fix the steam engine that causes their job to be so dangerous and tiresome, and for train travel to be so slow.

The writing is age appropriate and interesting and doesn't talk down to its audience giving a good clear picture of the process an engineer and inventor must go through. Slavin's illustrations are wonderful old-style paintings that fit the text perfectly. The story goes on to end with a small page telling where the phrase "the real McCoy" came from and how Elijah had a life filled with engine inventions and even some inventions that had nothing to do with engines, such as a portable ironing board. Young children will enjoy Elijah's story and older ones may be inspired to finding out more about him.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Y. S. Lee on Dec 10 2010
Format: Hardcover
This is a wonderful story presented in gorgeous fashion. Kulling's prose is precise and vivid and her narrative beautifully paced. She deals with McCoy's family background (his parents were slaves who came to Ontario on the Underground Railroad; he faced racial discrimination when seeking his first job) with compact matter-of-factness. Kulling never minimizes the uncomfortable question of race, yet keeps McCoy's inventive genius at the centre of the story. The drama of McCoy's first real invention is genuinely suspenseful: will it work?

Slavin's illustrations are beautiful, moving, and wonderfully detailed - the sort to pore over for long minutes after the story's over. Overall, All Aboard! is a triumph.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Hardcover
ALL ABOARD! ELIJAH McCOY'S STEAM ENGINE is another wonderful book in Monica Kulling's series about inventors. She brings a light humorous touch to a fascinating topic, the invention of the oil cup that oils the engine while the train is running. Her playful text is matched by Bill Slavin's whimsical illustrations. Girls and boys alike will be intrigued by the way Kulling captures the delight of the young Elijah who waits for his father's mowing machine to break and when it does, "he jumped for joy." Why? "Elijah was only six, but already he was good at tinkering with tools." And don't miss the beautiful poem with which Kulling begins the book, a lovely feature of each book in the series.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 7 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
An Early Black Inventor Sept. 15 2010
By Nicola Mansfield - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Reason for Reading: Taking my turn before handing it over for a bedtime read to my son, who is very much into inventors right now.

Lovely little first biography for picture book age children or older struggling readers who still like their books filled with illustrations. Of course, Elijah's life is told briefly and rapidly but it manages to hit upon all the major events of his life leading up to the invention of his oil cup which revolutionized steam travel. Not only do we get the facts of this young man's life, we also get insight into the era and the treatment of Blacks in the US and child labour in general. Canadian born Elijah, educated in Scotland, returned to his family now living back in the US, first meets up with a white man's disdain and ignorance as he tries to get a job designing train engines and ends up being an ashcat, the person who feeds the coal into the engine. Along with him is a small white boy, his "grease monkey" who keeps all the parts well oiled climbing under and over the engine in a dangerous job. These injustices though are what keep Elijah up at nights trying to figure out a way to fix the steam engine that causes their job to be so dangerous and tiresome, and for train travel to be so slow.

The writing is age appropriate and interesting and doesn't talk down to its audience giving a good clear picture of the process an engineer and inventor must go through. Slavin's illustrations are wonderful old-style paintings that fit the text perfectly. The story goes on to end with a small page telling where the phrase "the real McCoy" came from and how Elijah had a life filled with engine inventions and even some inventions that had nothing to do with engines, such as a portable ironing board. Young children will enjoy Elijah's story and older ones may be inspired to finding out more about him.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Climb Aboard Sept. 23 2010
By S Hughes - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
ALL ABOARD! ELIJAH McCOY'S STEAM ENGINE is another wonderful book in Monica Kulling's series about inventors. She brings a light humorous touch to a fascinating topic, the invention of the oil cup that oils the engine while the train is running. Her playful text is matched by Bill Slavin's whimsical illustrations. Girls and boys alike will be intrigued by the way Kulling captures the delight of the young Elijah who waits for his father's mowing machine to break and when it does, "he jumped for joy." Why? "Elijah was only six, but already he was good at tinkering with tools." And don't miss the beautiful poem with which Kulling begins the book, a lovely feature of each book in the series.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
All Aboard! Sept. 3 2010
By B. Miller - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Monica Kulling excels at taking a moment in history, oftentimes a forgotten moment, and creating a story that is compelling even as it is informative! "All Aboard! Elijah McCoy's Steam Engine" is the story of Elijah, an indomitable character with big dreams.

His parents, once enslaved, had escaped to Canada on the Underground Railroad. It's 1860 and Elijah dreams of becoming a mechanical engineer. His parents work hard, saving their money to send Elijah to study in Scotland. When he returns to his family, now living in Michigan, he's excited! Elijah knows "engines inside and out. He knew how to design them. He knew how to build them." But he soon realizes that there are not many opportunities for a young black man. Elijah needs work, and takes a job shoveling coal into the firebox. But as he discovers, it's a dangerous job.

So unfolds the charming story how Elijah McCoy invents the oil cup that oils the engine WHILE the train is running. We even learn the true meaning of the term "grease monkey." Monica's rhythmic, playful prose reflects the sights and sounds of the steam engine: "The engine huffed and puffed. Smoke billowed from its stack. The wheels clacked. The locomotive chugged along for about half an hour. Chug! Chug! Chug!"

Bill Slavin uses pen with ink on watercolor to bring Elijah - and his steam engine - to life. The illustrations puff and chug and roll across double page spreads. For the train enthusiast, and for anyone who just likes a great story, this book is a wonderful addition to your library!
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
... Oct. 28 2010
By Ulyyf - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This was an acceptable book. Unfortunately, I don't have it to hand for this review, so it'll be a short one.

All the necessary details of Elijah McCoy's life were covered - unfortunately, the author saw fit to put in that spurious nonsense about "the real McCoy" - a cute story, but the phrase predates the man, and so could not POSSIBLY have come from his inventions.

I did feel it jumped around a bit, especially during his childhood.
An absolute delight Dec 10 2010
By Y. S. Lee - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is a wonderful story presented in gorgeous fashion. Kulling's prose is precise and vivid and her narrative beautifully paced. She deals with McCoy's family background (his parents were slaves who came to Ontario on the Underground Railroad; he faced racial discrimination when seeking his first job) with compact matter-of-factness. Kulling never minimizes the uncomfortable question of race, yet keeps McCoy's inventive genius at the centre of the story. The drama of McCoy's first real invention is genuinely suspenseful: will it work?

Slavin's illustrations are beautiful, moving, and wonderfully detailed - the sort to pore over for long minutes after the story's over. Overall, All Aboard! is a triumph.


Feedback