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All-Star Archives Vol. 1 Hardcover – Nov 14 1997


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics (Nov. 14 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1563890194
  • ISBN-13: 978-1563890192
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 1.9 x 26.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 816 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,554,396 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Hardcover
I never grew up durring the Golden Age. And you don't need to be to enjoy this book. This book reprints All-Star JSA issues #3 - 6. The book features the VERY first Super Hero Team! The stories are corney, sure, but it's still fun and entertaining to this day. Like one reviewer said, if you get one Archive you'll want to get them all - it's that good! Comic fans will love this book, and it's other volumes.
This story features interesting characters, like Spectre, Dr. Fate, Golden Age Flash and Green Lantern, Hour Man, The Atom, Hawkman (also features Hawk girl in one issue) and my favorites Sandman and Jonny Thunder!!! All are classic heros that even appear today, like in Comics such as "Spectre" (Who is Hal Jordon now) and "JSA" written by Awsome Writer Goeff Johns.
Buy this book if your a comic fan! Even if you aren't into comics, it's a great place to start and learn. (May as well Start at the begining of Comic Histroy)
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Format: Hardcover
Anyone who is a true fan of comic books will truly appreciate this hard cover edition of the first Super Hero Team--The Justice Society of America. This team of heroes set the stage of their silver age counterparts, as well as, the Justice League of America. I am glad DC has put together these Archive Editions as an easy way to capture hard to find and out of print titles. You could easily spend thousands of dollars and long hours at comic conventions to buy back issues. I for one am hooked. Once you buy one, you'll want to buy the whole set.
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By Jonathan Stover TOP 1000 REVIEWER on Oct. 6 2011
Format: Hardcover
A combination of exhilaration and exasperation accompanies my reading of most Golden-Age (that is, 1937-1949) American superhero comic books. One can see both a genre and a medium being defined and refined, sometimes boldly, sometimes wrongly, sometimes ineptly. And as per Sturgeon's Law, at least 90% of it is crap. Maybe 99%.

Before the Avengers, the Justice League of America, the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, the X-Men -- before all other superhero teams and superhero groups -- was the Justice Society of America, debuting in 1940 in issue 3 of All-Star Comics, just less than 3 years after the appearance of the first American superheroes. The group comprised the company now known as DC's Golden Age superhero stable, with a few notable exceptions: Superman and Batman were honorary members who almost never appeared, as the Society was used to help promote 'DC's' less popular heroes, while Wonder Woman would generally only act as recording secretary and not an actual fighting member of the group.

The most active original members of the JSA would range from the fairly famous (the original Green Lantern and original Flash) to the more obscure (comic relief Johnny Thunder and Red Tornado, the original Atom, Hourman, Dr. Fate, and the Spectre). Heroes with earth-shaking cosmic powers (the Lantern and his magic ring, Flash, Fate, Spectre and, surprisingly perhaps, Johnny Thunder and his magical intelligent pink thunderbolt) sat beside heroes with limited powers (Hourman, whose Miraclo pills gave him an hour of enhanced strength), powerful gadgets (Starman, Dr. Midnite, Hawkman, Sandman) or no powers or gadgets at all (the dreary Atom, whose power was that he was really strong for a height-challenged person. And he wasn't a really strong dwarf or midget -- he was maybe 5'2".
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 10 reviews
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Excellent collection of classic tales July 9 2005
By T. J. Campbell - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
One of DC's earlier archive editions, this volume reprints the entirety of All-Star Comics #3-6, the first four issues of the Justice Society of America. Considering the high cost of the individual issues, this is a fantastic affordable way to own the contents of those issues. Each issue is broken up into linked individual adventures of the various members of the Justice Society, giving these characters an extra showcase outside of the titles they had their own adventures in. The overall package is very attractive and great care is evident in the reproduction. A must-own for fans of the Golden Age of comics and the Justice Society.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Fantastic Fun from the Golden Age May 30 2014
By Adam - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This book collects All Star Comics #3-6 the first appearances of the Justice Society of America in 1941.

Issue 3 is the official first appearance of the Justice Society but all the group actually does is meet and tell stories of their adventures making it an anthology story. Still, I appreciated how special it must have been for kids in 1941 to see the heroes all on the same place, and the interactions are fun.

Issue 4 sees the Justice Society getting to work on special assignment from the FBI rooting out fifth columnist activity. Some of this activity is sophistic, some isn't-such as when the Golden Age Atom who asks people, "You don't like America do you? Wouldn't you like a dictatorship better?" This issue follows the formula of almost all future issues as the JSA meet at the beginning, split up and individual take on the bad guys and then come back together at the end. In this case, they're led back towards that city of Nazi power-Toledo, Ohio.

Issue 5 is almost the reverse of a typical JSA story as a master criminal plans to take out the JSA and teams up crooks to go after them. The way this story plays out is a lot of fun with a great running gag.

After getting his own comic book, All-Flash Quarterly, the Flash was chosen as an honorary member and Johnny Thunder is to replace him on the active list. The JSA gives him an initiation of tracking down a criminal and they show him a series of headlines detailing the criminal's heinous crimes. After Johnny leaves, the JSA reveals the criminal is actually nut who prints these newspapers himself. However, despite this, Johnny Thunder manages to get into so much trouble that every single member of the Justice Society has to come to rescue him once. While I'm not a huge fan of Johnny Thunder in the JSA, this book on his initiation was just hilarious.

Overall, these are some of the most fun golden age comics I've read. The JSA is executed in a way that's fun and lighthearted, but with some decent adventures and with great variety. The solo adventures in the book which are part of every story include true Superpowered heroes (Flash, Green Lantern, and Hour Man), nonpowered Heroes (The Atom and the Sandman), and also supernatural heroes (The Spectre and Doctor Fate.)

Overall, this book is a highly recommended read for any superhero fan.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Solid Golden Age fun, but not as good as other Archives July 17 2014
By Adrian Jenkins - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is one of eight DC archives I have bought and will review. The prices are sometimes great (I purchased this volume, new, for around twenty dollars, although the new prices seem to have crept up in the last few days).

The Justice Society was one of those organizations I knew in name only. It was long gone by the time I began reading comics, and further, in my earliest days of reading, I was a Marvel fan, not a DC fan. But a number of years back, Geoff Johns started a new run on the Justice Society, and it was a ton of fun. Also, more recently, Earth-2 has re-introduced a new version of the group. So, after discovering these archives at a local shop (and immediately dismissing them because of the cover price), I decided to look for them online, and here we are.

Before I begin reviewing the comics, let me speak of the physicals of the product. The book has the same dimensions as other volumes in the DC Archives. However, one thing I don't like is the paper stock. For the other volumes I've received (Batman vols. 2 and 3, and Hawkman vol. 2), the paper was a heavy, matted paper which really brought to life the restored comics. Here, it's still heavy, but it's glossy white paper. Not only does it pick up glare from light, but it also sticks together easily (be sure to store this in a dry place!) and it just feels cheap (even if it isn't - I don't work at Dunder-Mifflin or anything). My guess is that this is an early volume, and they changed the paper later.

Now, onto the content. It's fun stuff. The first incarnation of the society doesn't include Superman or Wonder Woman (even as "honorary" members). This group is The Flash, the Green Lantern, The Specter, Dr. Fate, Hourman, The Atom, Hawkman, The Sandman and some kid named Johnny that gets his wishes granted by...a magical thunderbolt? Yeah. The Atom might be the most hilarious character in comic history - as another review mentioned, he really is just a short guy with a lot of moxie. His stories are just ridiculous. The Sandman is probably my favorite character. I remember how much I hated him post-Gaiman (it was just silly to hear some guy in a gas mask talk about his travels in the Dreaming), but he's perfectly readable here. I also liked Hourman, but I couldn't understand why he had a restriction to his power (he only has super powers for one hour at a time). It never seems to come up in the comics, so what's the point?

The stories are...interesting. It's particularly humorous to hear the Justice Society protect freedom of speech...by beating the crap out of speakers in public who say things against the goverment. A different time, I suppose. I enjoyed the first issue printed (All-Star Comics #3), which introduced the members with individual stories. Also, there was plenty of 4th-wall-breaking fun. Issue #4 was a little too...totalitarian for my taste. "America loves freedom, and you better, too!" Issue #5 is great. Issue #6 was standard.

All in all, a great purchase for the price at which I found it, but I'm not sure it would merit a fifty-dollar price tag for anyone but the biggest fans. Enjoy!
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Dawn of the Comics' Original Superteam Nov. 21 2010
By Danny L - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
In the 1970's my first all-star team of superheros were the Justice League of America, which consisted of the superstars of DC's silver age. Yet, as I got older I had discovered sometime between 1973 and 1974 the same company were re-issuing works of the Justice Society of America; and this introduced me to the origin of DC Comics, which we have come to know as the Golden Age.

Now, with this ALL STAR COMICS ARCHIVES-VOLUME 1, I can relive the magical times when a comic book was a comic book, when kids back in the 1940s could whet their fantasies of Flash, Wonder Woman, Hawkman, Green Lantern and the rest of the band battling underworld mobsters and the Nazis. It came during a time when the USA was a country determined on true freedom and liberty and the idea of human equality, something that is really missing in comic books today as well as in the troublesome society we live in now.
Hence, if you want to learn about the origins of your favorite superheroes of the past and enjoy the adventures at the same time, this collection is for you.
8 of 13 people found the following review helpful
Golden Age Comes Alive! May 2 2000
By Christopher J. Marshall - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Anyone who is a true fan of comic books will truly appreciate this hard cover edition of the first Super Hero Team--The Justice Society of America. This team of heroes set the stage of their silver age counterparts, as well as, the Justice League of America. I am glad DC has put together these Archive Editions as an easy way to capture hard to find and out of print titles. You could easily spend thousands of dollars and long hours at comic conventions to buy back issues. I for one am hooked. Once you buy one, you'll want to buy the whole set.


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