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All Tomorrows Parties Hardcover – May 29 2002


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 1 pages
  • Publisher: GP Putnam And Sons; First Edition edition (May 29 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0399145796
  • ISBN-13: 978-0399145797
  • Product Dimensions: 21.1 x 14.7 x 2.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 340 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (115 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,374,773 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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First Sentence
THROUGH THIS EVENING'S tide of faces unregistered, unrecognized, amid hurrying black shoes, furled umbrellas, the crowd descending like a single organism into the-station's airless heart, comes Shinya Yamazaki, his notebook clasped beneath his arm like the egg case of some modest but moderately successful marine species. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
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By M. Green on Sept. 10 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I'll give it two stars only because as a reveiwer's quote from the cover says, he's a great "stylist." I'm used to think I was a huge Gibson fan, but this book left completely cold. The story lines are pointless, characters poorly developed, and the conclusion is a big yawn.
Don't waste your money on this one.
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Format: Paperback
I had to read this book twice, the first time through, the first 100 pages or so were a little slow. The stories were just a little to spaced apart for me, and having only read Neuromancer, the characters seemed to rapidly introduced. The last half of the book, however, moved so rapidly, and combined all of the seemingly disjointed storylines from the first half into a smooth flowing mind blowing cataclysmic conclusion. Wow. The second time I read the book, which was after reading Idoru, and Virtual Light, (the other two books in the Rydell/Chevette/Colin Laney/Yamazaki/The Bridge saga) I was absolutely floored. This confirmed my hypothesis, Gibson is a Genious, and his works should be on everyone's shelves, regardless of their degree of technophilia.
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Format: Paperback
A brilliantly futuristic, 'digital' writing style, rich with metaphors that border on the surreal and a thought-provoking storyline leaves the reader with a faint tingling in the peripheral nerve endings. Woven around the principles of tomorrow's sciences - nanotechnology, virtual reality - 'All Tomorrow's Parties' is part thriller, part sci-fi and part a work of postmodern literature.
In speaking of 'wind farms', 'money in little tabs of plastic', 'nanobots', Gibson fast-forwards us to an era in the future. At the same time, he throws open the door to a new interpretation of history that is definitely mind-bending. His hypothesis: in every epoch, since the dawn of time, there have been 'nodal points', the points from which change emerges.
He speaks of such a 'change' again...
A set of apparently disjointed events flow in a linear progression until they all converge at a vortex. This is where it all ends, or rather begins - The Golden Gate Bridge. Colin Laney, who has the uncanny ability to predict the future by interpreting the 'data flow' around him; Tessa, an Australian media student at Los Angeles; Rydell, an ex-cop; Fontaine, a collector of antique watches; Cody Harwood, a megalomaniacal media mogul; Rei Toei, a beautiful, virtual icon, all converge at San Francisco. They are present at a decisive juncture in space and time to witness something, something which will alter the course of their destiny, their futures.
Grab a copy if you want to stroke your gray cells!
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By A Customer on Feb. 25 2003
Format: Paperback
I'm a William Gibson fan, but it's incomprehensible how anyone could describe this book as even remotely readable.
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Format: Paperback
It's kind of amazing the way Gibson creates disturbing, alternative worlds and makes us believe in them, while at the same time linking them to the present world via surreal cyber connections. It's really a reinterpretation of our reality. There are people, after all, who live on bridges... It's a fascinating book, imaginative and thought provoking and a must read if you like to wonder about the future. Don't strain your brain trying to follow the plot line, just go along for the magical mystery tour.
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Format: Paperback
William Gibson's All Tomorrow's Parties is a well-written and interesting book. Gibson employs an interesting present-tense writing style that challenges the reader. Through a wide assortment of characters and settings, Gibson creates a fast-paced and interesting story. He vividly describes his futuristic world where communities are created on damaged bridges, people live in cardboard boxes in subways, and experimental drugs exist that allow people to witness rare but significant events that forever change society. Probably the greatest element of this book is its variety of characters. They are all believable and unique in their own way. Gibson, unfolding a rich story, masterfully connects all these characters together despite their different backgrounds.
One of the main characters, Colin Laney, has taken the 5-SB drug. This drug allows him to see the world as data which he can interpret with relative ease. Laney believes that a "nodal point" is approaching that will change the world forever, and he believes that whatever happens will occur in the Bay Bridge area. However, the 5-SB drug has also left Laney obsessed with a man named Cody Harwood. Laney never considers the possibility that Harwood may be tampering with the data Laney interprets.

Despite the ill-effects of the drug, Laney hires Berry Rydell, a security guard at Lucky Dragon convenient store, to go to San Francisco. Rydell travels to the Bay Bridge and is given the device that contains Rei Toi, a computer generated idol-singer.
Other characters are woven into the complex plot that Gibson creates. There is Silencio, a quiet child obsessed with watches; Fontaine, the owner of a small collectable store; and Chevette, a former bridge resident fleeing her abusive ex-boyfriend.
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By A Customer on Sept. 6 2002
Format: Paperback
A few years ago, I started flirting with a heretical thought: is William Gibson really that good? After all, most of his stories border on being incomprehensible (if the basic elements of plot can even be discerned at all). His characters are both distasteful and uninteresting, like characters from a futuristic Jerry Springer show. Gibson is too impressed with his own stylistic flair to write a simple, comprehensible sentence that actually moves the story forward. Basically, Gibson inherited the worst traits of J.G. Ballard and simply added more stuff about computers and a vaguely "alternative" vibe. So why read Gibson?
In the end, there's aways that nugent or two of an interesting idea buried in Gibson's pretentious slop. Something that makes you think this is where the world's heading in a decade or two. When the idea comes together in your head, you say, "Whoa!" and usually spend a day or two thinking about it.
On that score, Gibson once again delivers, with concepts of "nodal points" and "existential sociology." But this book is an especially harsh read. I didn't give a flying leap about any of the losers around which the story revolves. Gibson resolved to write a story without any colorful adjectives - and I mean that literally. Nothing is described as red, blue, yellow, orange, sepia, or otherwise hued. Gibson had a point - reading the book gives you a strange, monochrome vision before you realize why. But it also makes the process of imagining the story a bit nauseating after awhile, and I firmly believe that book shouldn't physically hurt. Gibson has great ideas, but I wish he'd realize that you can tell intriguing, entertaining stories and still get across deep thoughts.
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