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American Wife Paperback – 2009


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Amazon.ca First Novel Award - 6 Canadian Novels Make the Shortlist



Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Black Swan (2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0552775541
  • ISBN-13: 978-0552775540
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 3.9 x 19.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 358 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,231,236 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

American Wife - Sittenfeld, Curtis - Black Swan

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By Reader Writer Runner TOP 50 REVIEWER on May 30 2011
Format: Paperback
My first read of 2010 was the latest novel by one of my favourite authors, Curtis Sittenfeld (of Prep and The Man of My Dreams). American Wife, which is based on the life of Laura Bush, represents a bit of a departure from Sittenfeld's usual style but still contains the elements of talented authorship: developed and personable characters, vividly descriptive settings and an intriguing plot. Sittenfeld divides her novel into four sections: The protagonist, Alice, as a child-come-teenager whose life changes after a heart-breaking tragedy; Alice as a working, single woman who eventually meets the goofy but charming Charlie Blackwell; Alice as a stay-at-home mom frustrated by her husband's childishness and his alcoholism; and, finally, Alice as a reluctant First Lady in the throes of war in the Middle East. I enjoyed the first two sections every bit as much as Sittenfeld's other works but I found the second half of the book disappointing. Old memories keep recurring and past hurts are rehashed; the narrative becomes "skimable" and it feels like the author is simply trying to fill space. I did appreciate the perspective on the "Blackwell" (read: Bush) government, though, as Alice, a registered Democrat, provides interesting insight on an administration in which she struggles to believe.
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Format: Hardcover
The book is divided into four segments, each dealing with a different time period in Alice Lundgren's life. The first section, dealing primarily with Alice's immediate family and her youthful years, is captivating and hold's the reader's intererst. The second section, is much the same but deals with her years as an independent young woman making her way in the world. A tragedy occurs which has a devastating impact on her life, both in younger and future years.

If you have read the editorial reviews, then you already know the outline of the story, so to save time and space, I will not repeat what has already been written. Suffice it to say, as we come to segments three and four (Alice's family life with arrogant, self-centered, thoughtless, future president Charlie Blackwell,) the story fizzles. There is a rehash of old wounds, hurts and life events to the point where it appears the author was merely trying to fill up space. Just when the reader anticipates life will be exciting as a president's wife, the story loses interest. The ending was a rather preditable, uneventful, fairy tale conclusion which, after 555 pages, left me feeling "a somewhat interesting read, but thank goodness it's over." The book had a huge potential if only the captivating beginning had carried through to the end.
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By Gail Cooke TOP 50 REVIEWER on Oct. 7 2008
Format: Audio CD
Many will remember narrator/actress Kimberly Farr as the Brekkian Langor in the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "Symbiosis". Others won't forget her after hearing her performance of American Wife. She's a many faceted performer with diverse roles on Broadway and television to her credit. Her voice is clear, distinct, perhaps stage trained. She is adept in moving from the tone of an 8-year-old girl to a grandmother to those of middle age, and very effective when Charlie enters the picture.

American Wife is at its heart the story of Alice and Charlie Blackwell. We first meet Alice at a tender age when she has accompanied her grandmother to the grocery store to buy hearts of palm. The year is 1954, and she is an only child, an innocent little girl we are given to believe. She lives with her parents and grandmother in Riley, Wisconsin.

The innocent child grows into a proper young lady who loves books. Tragedy strikes when at 17 a boy to whom she is attracted, Andrew, is killed in an auto accident. It's Alice's fault as she had run a stop sign and tore into his car. His death has a deep effect upon her.

Some years later, at the age of 31, she will meet and marry Charlie Blackstone, the wealthy, hell-raising son of a wealthy Republican family. Little did she know that the Charlie she deems "churlish" will some day be the President of the United States and she First Lady of our land.

Yes, the scene is Wisconsin rather than Texas, but the comparisons, imagined or real, to the life of Laura Bush are obvious. The author has been quoted as saying she " hates George W. And yet I think his wife is sincere, down-to-earth, smart -- and a role model for all Americans. "

An imagined First Lady or Laura Bush revealed? Listen and decide for yourself.

- Gail Cooke
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By Jill Meyer HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on May 3 2010
Format: Paperback
"American Wife" is a huge, juicy, wonderful novel. Obviously based on the life of Laura Welch Bush, Sittenfeld extrapolates from Bush's biography a "back story". It's probably wishful thinking that makes Sittenfeld have her Laura Bush/Alice Blackwell character do in the last chapter the one thing that the real Laura Bush has never done in "real life".

But if Sittenfeld makes free with the ending, she does bring life to Charlie Blackwell and his wife Alice. We see what may have been the attraction between the real George Bush and his wife.

I enjoyed this book and, while long, never bored me in the least.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Fabulous reading, could not put this book down.
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