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Amphibians and Reptiles of the Great Lakes Region Paperback – Oct 1 1997


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Univ of Michigan Pr (Oct. 1 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0472066285
  • ISBN-13: 978-0472066285
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 15.9 x 23.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 726 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #150,113 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By E. A. Lovitt on June 23 2004
Format: Paperback
Michigan is not a state that is well-known for its reptiles and amphibians, but if the whole drainage basin of the Great Lakes is taken into account, as it is in this book, we host a total of 33 amphibians (mostly salamanders!) and 42 reptiles (mostly snakes).
"Amphibians and Reptiles of the Great Lakes Region" starts with a preface on how to use this book, followed by a brief 34-page introduction to Herpetology. Most of 378 pages are taken up by descriptions of the 75 species of reptiles and amphibians that might be encountered by those of us who live near one of the Great Lakes. The color photographs and distribution maps are well-suited for species identification. I was able to recognize a pair of snakes that rove through a swampy area near our driveway as Northern Ribbon Snakes (Thamnophis sauritus septentrionalis), a handsome species of garter snake. The frogs that are currently hopping through the lawn are Wood Frogs (Rana sylvatica), not a brown variation of Leopard Frog (Rana pipiens), as I had originally thought.
Each of the species narratives is divided into the following sections: "Description;" "Confusing Species;" "Distribution and Status;" "Habitat and Ecology;" "Reproduction and Growth;" and "Conservation." The author stresses 'nonconsumptive' observation of these interesting creatures in their habitat, since many of the species are in decline. Newts seem to be especially vulnerable to degradation of their habitat and the author suggests conserving and protecting them by "creating ponds that are close to woodland habitats.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Aug. 28 2003
Format: Paperback
Mr. Harding is fairly well known in Michigan. When he does public speaking about his loved amphibians and reptiles, people respond well to him. This book shows the depth of his love for the natural world and his knowledge of these underappreciated creatures. Since there are relatively few amphibians and reptiles in the Great Lakes area you don't have to know 100s of different species. That alone makes identification easier. The high quality color photos and excellent descriptions in this book make identifications even easier.
Mr. Harding's text includes general biological information about the various creatures described in the book--frogs, toads, salamanders, newts, turtles, lizards and snakes. So, in addition to helping with identification, this book also helps the reader understand the biology and ecology of the animals. Though most people have little love for these animals, Mr. Harding's book will help us appreciate their places in the ecology and their biological functions.
Since there are so few books dealing with the amphibians and reptiles of the Great Lakes (is this the only one?), we are lucky that this one is truly excellent. Highly recommended to all people wanting to further their understanding of these creatures. Thanks to Mr. Harding for an exceptionally fine book.
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By pestie on Nov. 7 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
good book delivered on time
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 7 reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
You'll never mistake a newt for a skink again June 23 2004
By E. A. Lovitt - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Michigan is not a state that is well-known for its reptiles and amphibians, but if the whole drainage basin of the Great Lakes is taken into account, as it is in this book, we host a total of 33 amphibians (mostly salamanders!) and 42 reptiles (mostly snakes).
"Amphibians and Reptiles of the Great Lakes Region" starts with a preface on how to use this book, followed by a brief 34-page introduction to Herpetology. Most of 378 pages are taken up by descriptions of the 75 species of reptiles and amphibians that might be encountered by those of us who live near one of the Great Lakes. The color photographs and distribution maps are well-suited for species identification. I was able to recognize a pair of snakes that rove through a swampy area near our driveway as Northern Ribbon Snakes (Thamnophis sauritus septentrionalis), a handsome species of garter snake. The frogs that are currently hopping through the lawn are Wood Frogs (Rana sylvatica), not a brown variation of Leopard Frog (Rana pipiens), as I had originally thought.
Each of the species narratives is divided into the following sections: "Description;" "Confusing Species;" "Distribution and Status;" "Habitat and Ecology;" "Reproduction and Growth;" and "Conservation." The author stresses 'nonconsumptive' observation of these interesting creatures in their habitat, since many of the species are in decline. Newts seem to be especially vulnerable to degradation of their habitat and the author suggests conserving and protecting them by "creating ponds that are close to woodland habitats." I've lived in Michigan all of my live and have never seen any form of salamander, including newts, so I'll have to start looking more closely in and near the local woodland ponds. They are not for picking up, though. The author states that all members of the Salamandridae family have skins that "are well supplied with poison glands that help discourage predators."
"Amphibians and Reptiles of the Great Lakes Region" is a well-organized, well-written, and well-illustrated guide for all budding herpetologists or for those of us in the region who are curious about our natural surroundings.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
The Best Aug. 28 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Mr. Harding is fairly well known in Michigan. When he does public speaking about his loved amphibians and reptiles, people respond well to him. This book shows the depth of his love for the natural world and his knowledge of these underappreciated creatures. Since there are relatively few amphibians and reptiles in the Great Lakes area you don't have to know 100s of different species. That alone makes identification easier. The high quality color photos and excellent descriptions in this book make identifications even easier.
Mr. Harding's text includes general biological information about the various creatures described in the book--frogs, toads, salamanders, newts, turtles, lizards and snakes. So, in addition to helping with identification, this book also helps the reader understand the biology and ecology of the animals. Though most people have little love for these animals, Mr. Harding's book will help us appreciate their places in the ecology and their biological functions.
Since there are so few books dealing with the amphibians and reptiles of the Great Lakes (is this the only one?), we are lucky that this one is truly excellent. Highly recommended to all people wanting to further their understanding of these creatures. Thanks to Mr. Harding for an exceptionally fine book.
A Bible for the Reptiles and Amphibians of the Great Lakes Nov. 6 2013
By Mark Muhich - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Author Jim Harding presents a most knowledgeable understanding of the animals, their habitats their habits and their challenges to survival from a scientific perspective. The photographic illustrations of each of these species are lovely.
Better than expected July 25 2013
By Al - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Book was sold as "used" but the binding didn't even look broken! As good as new only less expensive. Over-achieved all expectations.
excellent book April 4 2013
By john mcgrath - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is well written and very informative with excellent photographs. I am very happy I purchased this book. A must for reptiles and amphibian lovers.


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