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Amused To Death


Price: CDN$ 8.49 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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Amused To Death + The Pros and Cons of Hitch Hiking + Radio K.A.O.S.
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Sept. 1 1992)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Sony Music Canada
  • ASIN: B0000027I6
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (175 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,864 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. The Ballad Of Bill Hubbard
2. What God Wants, Part I
3. Perfect Sense, Part I
4. Perfect Sense, Part II
5. The Bravery Of Being Out Of Range
6. Late Home Tonight, Part I
7. Late Home Tonight, Part II
8. Too Much Rope
9. What God Wants, Part II
10. What God Wants, Part III
11. Watching TV
12. Three Wishes
13. It's A Miracle
14. Amused To Death

Product Description

Product Description

Vinyl Classics reissue of this 1992 album comes as a vinyl look-a-like CD that's packaged in a die-cut see-through slipcase. Sony.

Amazon.ca

Amused to Death is perfectly titled; it conveys its maker's mordant humor and underlying pessimism. Roger Waters's third solo album allowed a faint but perceptible return to the sound of his estranged former band, Pink Floyd. There are moments here ("What God Wants," "Three Wishes") that recall nothing so much as the densely textured sound of Animals and The Wall. And like those works, this is a concept album--the concept (as ever with Waters) being the crappy nature of modern life. Fair enough, but as usual, his satire is blunt and the targets of his scorn obvious. Former Eagle Don Henley duets on "Watching TV," while Jeff Beck contributes taut, lyrical solos to a number of tracks, notably "It's a Miracle." Waters's voice, however, remains the same: a weary whisper, positively dripping with contempt. --Andrew McGuire

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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Jan. 27 2004
Format: Audio CD
It is common knowledge that all, or at least 99% of Floyd fans, fall into 2 categories...the Waters camp, and the other three. While I understand the deal with the breakup...Roger looked at it as firing Gilmour and Mason (Wright had already been canned), and the others looked at it as Waters quiting. I personally think it was a mistake for the others to continue with the name because Momentary Lapse and the other thing is NOT Floyd (there is a ton of money involved with the NAME 'Pink Floyd'). It is obvous that Waters and Gilmour apart will NEVER do the things they did, whatever they call themselves. That being said, I have always preferred Waters' music to the others. But again, it's NOT Floyd, so don't think anything Waters does will be Floyd, anymore that what the other three guys have done (or will do). But I will say that 'Amused to Death' is the best thing Waters has done since The Wall. I often wondered, after the breakup, what would it be like if Jimmy Page got together with Waters, or Alex Lifeson, or maybe Jeff Beck. Well, Mr. Beckola is here and he is awesome. There are parts where Beck makes his Strat sound like a monkey. The last 1/3 of this disc, beginning with 'What God Wants pt III' is absolutely stunning!! To those of you who didn't like 'Pros & Cons' (as I didn't, but loved the show in 85), and to those who maybe who have never heard KAOS, but heard it was a bore (as I haven't and did), then you will love this part of the recording. There are parts that are 'disgusted and pi@#ed off at the world' as is the norm for Roger, but some of this stuff is outta this world! Instead of Dogs, Pigs, and Sheep...we now have vultures, raccoons, magpies, and goundhogs, to name but a few. Every race, color, nationality, and religion, is insulted.Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Terrence J Reardon on June 21 2004
Format: Audio CD
Former Pink Floyd bassist/vocalist/mastermind Roger Waters released his third post-Pink Floyd solo effort Amused to Death in September of 1992. Amused to Death was over five years in the making due to his battle with his ex-bandmates on the rights to the Pink Floyd name. When Amused hit record stores, it was modestly received peaking at #21 on the US album chart and had a huge rock radio hit with What God Wants Part 1. Roger's third solo album's sound was a return to the sound of his estranged former band, Pink Floyd unlike his two 80s works Pros and Cons or Radio K.A.O.S.. There are plenty of moments here (the aforementioned What God Wants(pt.1), the opening Ballad of Bill Hubbard, Three Wishes) that recall the sound of later Floyd works like Animals, The Wall and The Final Cut. Like those works, this is a concept album--the concept (as ever with Waters) being the crappy nature of modern life as depicted on television with the Gulf War and the Tijanamen Square incidents as examples and also the rise of a corporate world. His satire is blunt as usual and the targets of his scorn are obvious. Eagle drummer/vocalist Don Henley duets on Watching TV(which was about the Tijanamen Square incident and the collaboration of Henley and Waters triggered a friendship between the two which is still strong today). Legendary rock guitar legend Jeff Beck(like Clapton on Pros and Cons was a Yardbird) contributed taut, lyrical solos to a number of tracks(Bill Hubbard, What God Wants(pts. 1 and 3), Watching TV, Three Wishes, It's a Miracle and the closing optimistic title cut). The late conductor Michael Kamen contributed some stirring orchestrations on this album as well. Waters' voice was mainly reduced to a weary whisper, positively dripping with contempt due to the strain his vocal cords suffered from all the screaming on The Wall, The Final Cut and Pros and Cons of Hitchhiking. This album is a classic and a welcome return for Roger Waters. Highly recommended!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Paul Beaulieu on Sept. 1 2003
Format: Audio CD
I remember first hearing this 11 years ago, and being so pleased at how good this album was- and at how good Roger Waters' material still could be.
OK, this is not everyone's cup of tea. Certainly the reaction of some critics was less than effusive. 'Yet another doom laden LP' was a typical comment. And although I'm glad he's doing what he's doing, sometimes I do wish he'd lighten up a bit every now and then. The good news, though, is that this set contains some great songs, and has the feel of a Pink Floyd concept album without being a pale copy. Waters' love of the blues is comes through here (he was always responsibile for the bluesier part of the Floyd repertoire), especially since he has Jeff Beck play some amazing lead guitar. As usual, the songs are linked by an almost cinematic soundtrack of background sound. The first part has more concise rock songs, the highlights being 'What God Wants Part 1", 'Perfect Sense Part 2', and 'The Bravery of Being Out of Range'. Then we have 'What God Wants Part 3', which still sends shivers down my spine, especially that Beck guitar solo, followed by Waters yelling 'Christ it's freezing outside, the veteran cried". It also starts off with the same piano 'ping!' that started off Floyd classic 'Echoes', before Waters sings "Don't be afraid/It's only business"- a not-at-all subtle dig at his former collegues, but then Waters has never been known for his subtlety. Towards the end, the songd get longer, more droning and more atmospheric- Floyd fans will probably like it, those insisting on concise, to-the-point songs will not.
Waters does have a tendancy to put things on his albums that are there to advance the 'concept' of the album, which are too wordy and add too little of musical value.
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