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Amused To Death


Price: CDN$ 5.00 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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Frequently Bought Together

Amused To Death + The Pros and Cons of Hitch Hiking
Price For Both: CDN$ 14.60


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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Sept. 1 1992)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Sony Music Canada
  • ASIN: B0000027I6
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (174 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,841 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. The Ballad Of Bill Hubbard
2. What God Wants, Part I
3. Perfect Sense, Part I
4. Perfect Sense, Part II
5. The Bravery Of Being Out Of Range
6. Late Home Tonight, Part I
7. Late Home Tonight, Part II
8. Too Much Rope
9. What God Wants, Part II
10. What God Wants, Part III
11. Watching TV
12. Three Wishes
13. It's A Miracle
14. Amused To Death

Product Description

Product Description

Vinyl Classics reissue of this 1992 album comes as a vinyl look-a-like CD that's packaged in a die-cut see-through slipcase. Sony.

Amazon.ca

Amused to Death is perfectly titled; it conveys its maker's mordant humor and underlying pessimism. Roger Waters's third solo album allowed a faint but perceptible return to the sound of his estranged former band, Pink Floyd. There are moments here ("What God Wants," "Three Wishes") that recall nothing so much as the densely textured sound of Animals and The Wall. And like those works, this is a concept album--the concept (as ever with Waters) being the crappy nature of modern life. Fair enough, but as usual, his satire is blunt and the targets of his scorn obvious. Former Eagle Don Henley duets on "Watching TV," while Jeff Beck contributes taut, lyrical solos to a number of tracks, notably "It's a Miracle." Waters's voice, however, remains the same: a weary whisper, positively dripping with contempt. --Andrew McGuire

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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Aaron Bock on Sept. 8 2002
Format: Audio CD
This album is, hands down, Roger Waters' best solo work. I would go so far to say that it even rivals The Wall. Like The Wall, the album has a single collective message/concept behind it, one that is meant to stimulate the listener's thinking. I interpret it as saying that the human race is slowly destroying itself; the lyrics in the last song "Amused to Death" elude heavily to this. Waters develops this idea through songs that discuss the elements of society that are bringing us to our doom, such as organized religion ("What God Wants, Parts I, II, and III"), war and the military ("The Bravery of Being Out of Range, Late Home Tonight, Parts I, and II"), repression of free thought and speech ("Watching TV"), and failure to learn from our history("Perfect Sense, Part I"). Despite all the negativity, Waters does offer occasional glimmers of hope for us (something he's done more of in recent years), such as in "It's A Miracle" and perhaps (depending on how you interpret it) the closing monologue in "Amused to Death" (a continuation of the one in "The Ballad of Bill Hubbard; turn the volume up to hear it). The lyrics are consistently thought-provoking, occasionally depressing, but overall amazingly beautiful and clever. Musically, most of the songs are very relaxing. Perhaps this was Waters' intent, to relax the listener so he/she could take in the album's message and think about it more easily. As in his past solo works, Waters employs the talents of several legendary musicians, namely guitarists Jeff Beck and Don Henley. Beck doesn't play the usual style of rock guitar he's known for; his solos are much more reminiscent of David Gilmour, and almost as impressive and creative. The album does have a distinct Pink Floyd style to it, with many of the same musical elements (i.e.Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Alex De Luca on May 15 2002
Format: Audio CD
Amused to Death is so moving. It's a work of passion that, when taken as a whole, can move you to tears. Each song is a deep look into humanity, media and things that just make us think about ourselves and the world. It's 70 minutes of brilliance. Roger Waters is in perfect form as the songwriter, player, singer, bandleader and, perhaps most of all, satirist. To me, this album greatly surpasses and previous Roger Waters solo release (all good, incidentally) but - now this will sound sacrilegious - any Pink Floyd release as well. Without being - how can I put this - "steered" by the likes of David Gilmore and the whole Pink Floyd machine, Waters does exactly what he sets out to do on his own terms. Listen to it. Listen to the lyrics. Listen to it - beginning to end - with a good pair of headphones on a good stereo in a darkened room and ALONE. Listen to everything going on in the background. It all means something. There is no single standout. It all stands out. It's ironic, humorous, sad, impassioned and poignant. If you're looking for music without a message that's three minutes long, don't listen to this. It's not "depressing", as is often associated with Water's music, it's thought provoking. The performances by all the musicians - in particular Jeff Beck - are flawless. They compliment the pieces they play on. Nothing is out of place. I couldn't possibly recommend this CD more.
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Format: Audio CD
Former Pink Floyd bassist/vocalist/mastermind Roger Waters released his third post-Pink Floyd solo effort Amused to Death in September of 1992. Amused to Death was over five years in the making due to his battle with his ex-bandmates on the rights to the Pink Floyd name. When Amused hit record stores, it was modestly received peaking at #21 on the US album chart and had a huge rock radio hit with What God Wants Part 1. Roger's third solo album's sound was a return to the sound of his estranged former band, Pink Floyd unlike his two 80s works Pros and Cons or Radio K.A.O.S.. There are plenty of moments here (the aforementioned What God Wants(pt.1), the opening Ballad of Bill Hubbard, Three Wishes) that recall the sound of later Floyd works like Animals, The Wall and The Final Cut. Like those works, this is a concept album--the concept (as ever with Waters) being the crappy nature of modern life as depicted on television with the Gulf War and the Tijanamen Square incidents as examples and also the rise of a corporate world. His satire is blunt as usual and the targets of his scorn are obvious. Eagle drummer/vocalist Don Henley duets on Watching TV(which was about the Tijanamen Square incident and the collaboration of Henley and Waters triggered a friendship between the two which is still strong today). Legendary rock guitar legend Jeff Beck(like Clapton on Pros and Cons was a Yardbird) contributed taut, lyrical solos to a number of tracks(Bill Hubbard, What God Wants(pts. 1 and 3), Watching TV, Three Wishes, It's a Miracle and the closing optimistic title cut). The late conductor Michael Kamen contributed some stirring orchestrations on this album as well. Waters' voice was mainly reduced to a weary whisper, positively dripping with contempt due to the strain his vocal cords suffered from all the screaming on The Wall, The Final Cut and Pros and Cons of Hitchhiking. This album is a classic and a welcome return for Roger Waters. Highly recommended!
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Audio CD
Former Pink Floyd mastermind Roger Waters released his third post-Pink Floyd solo effort Amused to Death in September of 1992. Amused to Death was over five years in the making due to his battle with his ex-bandmates on the rights to the Pink Floyd name. When Amused hit record stores, it was modest received peaking at #21 and had a huge rock radio hit with What God Wants Part 1. Roger's third solo album's sound was a return to the sound of his estranged former band, Pink Floyd unlike his 80s works like Pros and Cons or Radio K.A.O.S. There are plenty of moments here (the aforementioned What God Wants(pt.1), the opening Ballad of Bill Hubbard, Three Wishes) that recall the sound of later Floyd works like Animals, The Wall and The Final Cut. Like those works, this is a concept album--the concept (as ever with Waters) being the crappy nature of modern life as depicted on television with the Gulf War and the Tijanamen Square incidents as examples and also the rise of a corporate world. His satire is blunt as usual and the targets of his scorn are obvious. Eagle drummer/vocalist Don Henley duets on Watching TV(which was about the Tijanamen Square incident and the collaboration of Henley and Waters triggered a friendship between the two which is still strong today). Legendary rock guitar legend Jeff Beck(like Clapton on Pros and Cons was a Yardbird) contributed taut, lyrical solos to a number of tracks(Bill Hubbard, What God Wants(pts. 1 and 3), Watching TV, Three Wishes, It's a Miracle and the closing optimistic title cut. The late Michael Kamen contributed some stirring orchestrations on this album as well. Waters' voice was mainly reduced to a weary whisper, positively dripping with contempt due to the strain his vocal cords suffered from all the screaming on The Wall, The Final Cut and Pros and Cons. This album is a classic and a welcome return for Roger Waters. Highly recommended!
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