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An Execution in the Family: One Son's Journey Hardcover – Jun 19 2003


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press; First Edition edition (June 19 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312306369
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312306366
  • Product Dimensions: 24 x 16.3 x 2.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 549 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,577,922 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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First Sentence
I WAS SIX YEARS, ONE MONTH, AND ONE DAY OLD ON MONDAY, JUNE 15, 1953-four days before my parents' execution. Read the first page
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Rachel on June 27 2004
Format: Hardcover
This book is so much more than just a recounting of Ethel and Julius Rosenberg. It is their son Robert's life journey which is directly a result of his parent's execution. Robert mentions that moral arguments are problematic because they are not necessarily rational. He is right, but that being said, all of his arguments against the "establishment" being wrong have no more credibility than his own opinion of being right. Robert's loyalty to the left and his concern with fighting the "them," who executed his parents almost 50 years ago, has blinded him. We see how the movement is like leaf that just blows in the wind according to the political current. He is so concerned with remaining on the "left," his parent's party, that his own ideologies evolve with the movement. He moves from communism to SDS, to progressive, etc. Robert has no absolute standard for right and wrong. Who can blame him? In a Godless world, there is no absolute standard.
I can't even begin to articulate how this story saddened me though. It saddens me to admit that I had never heard of the Rosenbergs, although I went to an Ivy League University and was familiar with the McCarthy era. I learned about the Rosenbergs from an HBO documentary by Michael's daughter. I also hate to admit that most of my peers have never heard of the Rosenbergs. I was so upset to learn about of all of the Jews who were involved in the execution of Ethel and Julius. Although Robert's recount is very pragmatic, there is such an underlying pain and sadness between the words. What saddened me most is the torn Rosenberg/Greenglass family. As a Jew myself, I can honestly say, their pain is my pain. Family not taking them in; it is not Jewish! Where were those Jewish values and ethics?
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By A Customer on May 10 2004
Format: Hardcover
This book is an inspiring read that speaks to all of us. Not only has he given us a mvoing personal account of his own life, but Robert Meeropol challenges us all, as he challenges himself, to lead a life of purpose and humanity.
As a child of his generation, I could not help but see bits of myself and the inner conflicts of my life throughout the book. I laughed and read passages aloud to my spouse, but also shed more than a few tears. But in the end, this is a story of triumph and struggle. Not to be missed.
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By Susan Driscoll on Feb. 19 2004
Format: Hardcover
Robert Meeropol manages to write a book about what must be an intensely painful subject for him -- his parents' execution -- with few traces of bitterness or rancor. He also deals honestly with the anger he does have, most of which is reserved for his uncle, David Greenglass. His approach to the question of their guilt or innocence is remarkably evenhanded, which makes the book all the more credible. Although he and his brother have lived their lives in the shadow of their parents' executions, both seem to have carved out productive, happy lives for themselves, which gives a glimmer of hope to this tragic story, well told.
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