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Analytical Chemistry: An Introduction [Paperback]

Douglas A. Skoog , Donald M. West , F. James Holler
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

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Book Description

January 1994 0030989825 978-0030989827 International 2 Revised ed
Readability combines with a complete and systematic presentation of material in the sixth edition of this classic, student-oriented textbook. Simple language, new worked examples and problems, and concentrated coverage of topics in smaller units provide majors and nonmajors with a solid introduction to quantitative analytical chemistry in a one- or two- semester course. Features on biomedical, biological, and environmental topics will interest students studyting medicine, allied health, and other areas. Mathcad Computer Exercise Supplement introduces students to a powerful and versatile mathematical tool and its application to problems and computations of analytical chemistry. Many references in this paperback supplement refer to problems and examples in the textbook. Solutions Manual saves instructors time and may also be used as a student study aid.
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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1. Introduction. Section I. The Tools of Analytical Chemistry. 2. Chemicals and Apparatus: Putting the Tools to Work. 3. Important Chemical Concepts: Expressing Quantities and Concentrations. 4. The Basic Approach to Chemical Equilibrium. 5. Errors in Chemical Analysis: Assessing the Quality of Results. 6. Random Errors: How Certain Can We Be? 7. Statistical Analysis: Evaluating the Data. Section II. Principles and Applications of Chemical Equilibria. 8. Gravimetric Methods of Analysis. 9. Electrolyte Effects: Activity or Concentration? 10. How Equilibrium Calculations Can Be Applied to Complex Systems. 11. Titrations: Taking Advantage of Stoichiometric Reactions. 12. Principles of Neutralization Titrations: Determining Acids, Bases, and the pH of Buffer Solutions. 13. Titrating Polyfunctional Acids and Bases. 14. Applying Neutralization Titrations. 15. Complex-Forming Titrations: Taking Advantage of Complexing Agents and Precipitating Agents. Section III. Electrochemical Methods. 16. Elements of Electrochemistry. 17. Using Electrode potentials. 18. Applying Oxidation/Reduction Titrations. 19. Potentiometry: Measuring Concentrations of Ions and Molecules. 20. A Brief Look at Some Other Electroanalytical Methods. Section IV. Spectrochemical Analysis. 21. Spectroscopic methods of Analysis: making Measurements with Light. 22. Instruments for Measuring Absorption: Is It a Photometer, a Spectrophotometer, or a Spectrometer? 23. Applying Molecular and Atomic Spectroscopic methods: Shedding More Light on the Subject. Section V. 24. An Introduction to Analytical Separations. 25. Gas-Liquid and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography. 26. Supercritical-Fluid Chromatography, Capillary Electrophoreses, and Capillary Electrochromatography. Section VI. 27. Selected Methods of Analysis. Appendix: Solubility Product Constants at 25 C. Appendix A: Acid Dissociation Constants at 25 C. Appendix B: Formation Constants of Complex Compounds at 25 C. Appendix C: Standard and Formal Electrode Potentials. Appendix D: Use of Exponential Numbers and Logarithms. Appendix E: Volumetric Calculations Using Normality and Equivalent Weight. Appendix F: Acronyms and Abbreviations of Significance in Analytical Chemistry. Appendix G: Answers to Selected Questions and Problems. Glossary. Index. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

About the Author

F. James Holler is a Professor of Chemistry and recipient of the Alumni Association Great Teacher Award at the University of Kentucky. He received his Ph.D. from Michigan State University. In addition to his role as co-author of several best-selling texts, he is co-creator of the world-famous Periodic Table of Comic Books. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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4.0 out of 5 stars Solid Answer Key Feb. 10 2014
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Answer Key has answers to every question except it only answers A,C,E parts of questions which should be more than enough to get you on track for your assignments or for practicing for mid terms and finals.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good text for intro, general analytical course(s) Jan. 22 2003
Format:Hardcover
We use this text (now in its 7th edition) for both our Analytical I (chemical analysis) and Analytical II (instrumental analysis) courses. They are both 1-semester courses at the sophomore year, and this text is just the correct level and length to cover both courses. There are a number of broad sections, each of which is divided into several chapters. Roughly the 1st half covers chemical methods and the second half covers the instrumental methods. There are also a few chapters devoted to statistical analysis.
The sections are reasonably independent and can be done in pretty much any order, giving a great degree of flexibility. The text itself is easy to read with numerous descriptive diagrams. I say this for second-year level courses - the text is too superficial for higher levels. There is a good mix of descriptive chemistry to give the student a feel for the chemistry behind the analyses. Finally, there are adequate exercises at the end of the chapters, some of which are cumulative with previous sections. There is also a very handy tutorial on the use of Microsoft's Excel for use in a course like this, including some specific exercises in using the spreadsheet. I find it very helpful, and not at all exclusive for those using Excel since Quatro-Pro (and Lotus?) is very similar and contains help files that translate from Excel parlance.
My biggest issue is lack of a section on mass spectroscopy. Skoog's own "Instrumental Analysis" text has a fine section on mass spec, but this text contains virtually no mention of the technique, in spite of the fact that it is an increasingly important technique for both quantitative and qualitative trace analysis. However, that's the only real negative point - this text is very good and useful for 2nd year level analytical courses. (P.S. students find it straightforward and clear as well.)
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.4 out of 5 stars  14 reviews
22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Worthy Alternative to Skoog and West's Fundamentals of... Dec 2 1999
By "thed0ct0r" - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
This text is a worthy contender to the classic "Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry' by Skoog and West. I feel it is easier to read, and the examples given in the inserts should provide students with a "real world" need for the topics covered. The coverage is very similar to Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry. The example problems and homework problems are illustrative and challanging. The experiments presented in the final chapters are well documented. My only observations for improvement would be the use of more detailed analysis of some of the insert examples. For example, a battery technology that is discussed in a step by step fashion in terms of equilibria, balancing redox equations, and problem solving. Also, a modernization of laboratory experiments to include topics in biochemistry, food and environmental science would be helpful in any future editon.
15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good text for intro, general analytical course(s) Jan. 22 2003
By Craig MACKINNON - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
We use this text (now in its 7th edition) for both our Analytical I (chemical analysis) and Analytical II (instrumental analysis) courses. They are both 1-semester courses at the sophomore year, and this text is just the correct level and length to cover both courses. There are a number of broad sections, each of which is divided into several chapters. Roughly the 1st half covers chemical methods and the second half covers the instrumental methods. There are also a few chapters devoted to statistical analysis.
The sections are reasonably independent and can be done in pretty much any order, giving a great degree of flexibility. The text itself is easy to read with numerous descriptive diagrams. I say this for second-year level courses - the text is too superficial for higher levels. There is a good mix of descriptive chemistry to give the student a feel for the chemistry behind the analyses. Finally, there are adequate exercises at the end of the chapters, some of which are cumulative with previous sections. There is also a very handy tutorial on the use of Microsoft's Excel for use in a course like this, including some specific exercises in using the spreadsheet. I find it very helpful, and not at all exclusive for those using Excel since Quatro-Pro (and Lotus?) is very similar and contains help files that translate from Excel parlance.
My biggest issue is lack of a section on mass spectroscopy. Skoog's own "Instrumental Analysis" text has a fine section on mass spec, but this text contains virtually no mention of the technique, in spite of the fact that it is an increasingly important technique for both quantitative and qualitative trace analysis. However, that's the only real negative point - this text is very good and useful for 2nd year level analytical courses. (P.S. students find it straightforward and clear as well.)
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Analytical Chemistry: an introduction Oct. 15 2010
By Stephen Patton - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
This book is definetly a keeper! A masterpiece of clarity. Although it is >10 years old, this introductory book is still by far the best book of its kind. It is one of of the few chemistry books that I have read from cover to cover several times, and each time I still pick up insights into problem solving and the reasoning behind analytical techniques. The classical experiments in chapter 27 are so good that purchase of a seperate laboratory book is un-necessary.
8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A Very Poor Book Dec 14 2006
By David Smith - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
I am a CHEM major and I was consistently surprised at how many typos and flat-out errors the SEVENTH edition of this book had - seven editions and still poor editing! The examples that are provided are for simpler problems and when you go to do homework, you're lost. Also, instead of using less than a penny's-worth of ink and printing the equation that they are using in an example, it will just refer you back to another page in the book where it was introduced. Some problems require several equations, and you're flipping back and forth all-over the book just to see what equations they are using.

If you're stuck with this book, I recommend you somehow obtain the INSTRUCTORS' solutions manual (or at least the students' solutions manual) so you can actually do the homework.

I also bought a used, previous edition of the Harris Quantitative Analysis textbook. You can get it and a solutions manual pretty cheap if you get a previous version and it's a good book that will explain what Skoog tries to explain so poorly.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Informative April 25 2013
By David Challacomb - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
My professor rates it highly and assures us that htis book is the authority on quantitative analysis, and that this book will be an asset in our future. He said it has trained the last forty years of chemists. It is a blessing to be able to own it.
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