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Anatomy of the Ship: The Battlecruiser Hood Hardcover – Apr 6 2010


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Conway; 2nd Revised edition edition (April 6 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 085177900X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0851779003
  • Product Dimensions: 25.6 x 25.3 x 1.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 699 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,185,698 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ned Middleton TOP 100 REVIEWER on July 1 2004
Format: Hardcover
There was a time when the Battlecruiser Hood was the largest, fastest and most handsome capital ship in the world. She was also adored by the British public and in many ways came to symbolise everything that was supremely good about the Royal Navy. On 24 May 1941 the Hood was famously sunk by the Bismarck with only three of her crew of 1,419 surviving. It was an act which resulted in Churchill giving the order "Sink the Bismarck" and, of course, they did. More recently, the remains of HMS Hood have been located at great depth in the North Atlantic resulting in renewed interest in the ship itself. Elsewhere, there are websites dedicated to the vessel and a very strong HMS Hood Association attended by those who had previously served on this, the most beautiful of ships. This is an excellent book for all such interested people.
Conway Maritime Press are well known for their "Anatomy of the Ship" series in which they provide the finest technical documentation for specific ships or ship types ever published. "The Battlecruiser Hood" is hard-back measuring 10¼" (wide) x 9¾" with 127 pages of detailed and factual information. This wide format allows the publishers to produce first class detailed line drawings of every aspect of this ship in a size that is easy to see and follow. All the information is there - right down to the last nut and bolt.
Laid down in 1916, Hood was designed and constructed when ships got close to the enemy and fired straight at them. By the time she was completed in 1918, however, battleships were able to lob their shells great distances with alarming accuracy. This new dimension of warfare at sea with shells "falling from the sky" meant that all warships required armour plating on their decks where previously it had only been on the sides.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By "fullmooninthesky" on April 2 2002
Format: Hardcover
As far as I am concerned, the book is outstanding. The diagrams of the battlecruiser are superb. As a modeler, the book shows clearly, the amount of detail that can be achieved. The profile inside the jacket is cool. For the HMS Hood fan, the book is right up their alley.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Robert Lester on July 10 2001
Format: Hardcover
This was the first book in the 36 books of the Anatomy of the ship series, published by Conway Maritime Press and the Naval Institute Press.
Each book depicts an historical vessel. The Hood was the pride of the Royal Navy, and like the Titanic, unsinkable. Until it was sunk by the by the Bismarck and the Prinz Eugen. Why, because the deck armour was too thin. Anyway, this book was a revolution in detail, published first in 1982. It tells the story of the ship, then has many photos, and as the benchmark for the series has wonderful line drawings of every aspect of the vessel.
A collectors item that is worth hundreds in first edition, but the new revised editions are somewhat more reasonable.
Sensational.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 6 reviews
17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
The first of the "Anatomy of the Ship" series July 10 2001
By Robert Lester - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This was the first book in the 36 books of the Anatomy of the ship series, published by Conway Maritime Press and the Naval Institute Press.
Each book depicts an historical vessel. The Hood was the pride of the Royal Navy, and like the Titanic, unsinkable. Until it was sunk by the by the Bismarck and the Prinz Eugen. Why, because the deck armour was too thin. Anyway, this book was a revolution in detail, published first in 1982. It tells the story of the ship, then has many photos, and as the benchmark for the series has wonderful line drawings of every aspect of the vessel.
A collectors item that is worth hundreds in first edition, but the new revised editions are somewhat more reasonable.
Sensational.
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
Everything you need to know about the Hood. Sept. 28 2003
By Ned Middleton - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
There was a time when the Battlecruiser Hood was the largest, fastest and most handsome capital ship in the world. She was also adored by the British public and in many ways came to symbolise everything that was supremely good about the Royal Navy. On 24 May 1941 the Hood was famously sunk by the Bismarck with only three of her crew of 1,419 surviving. It was an act which resulted in Churchill giving the order "Sink the Bismarck" and, of course, they did. More recently, the remains of HMS Hood have been located at great depth in the North Atlantic resulting in renewed interest in the ship itself. Elsewhere, there are websites dedicated to the vessel and a very strong HMS Hood Association attended by those who had previously served on this, the most beautiful of ships. This is an excellent book for all such interested people.

Conway Maritime Press are well known for their "Anatomy of the Ship" series in which they provide the finest technical documentation for specific ships or ship types ever published. "The Battlecruiser Hood" is hard-back measuring 10¼" (wide) x 9¾" with 127 pages of detailed and factual information. This wide format allows the publishers to produce first class detailed line drawings of every aspect of this ship in a size that is easy to see and follow. All the information is there - right down to the last nut and bolt.

Laid down in 1916, Hood was designed and constructed when ships got close to the enemy and fired straight at them. By the time she was completed in 1918, however, battleships were able to lob their shells great distances with alarming accuracy. This new dimension of warfare at sea with shells "falling from the sky" meant that all warships required armour plating on their decks where previously it had only been on the sides. This requirement, coupled with an explanation of the financial restrictions placed upon the Royal Navy during the inter-war years provides the reader with all the reasons why HMS Hood was lost in the way she was.

This informative introduction continues with a service history of the ship followed by a series of "Tables" which include comparisons in battleship and Battlecruiser designs and information on the ship's; trials, dimensions, displacement, stability, armament, fire control, ship's boats and modifications. Next is 13 pages of historic photographs followed by 93 pages of detailed line drawings and more specific technical information.

And detailed it is too; Under the first main heading "General arrangements" we commence with an external profile of the ship followed by a series of detailed line drawings showing every aspect of this ship in cross section - deck by deck and room by room, from aft to bows. Then everything is repeated from above as we work our way down through every level of the ship from the highest part of the superstructure to the keel. These are followed with more specific technical information under such headings as hull construction, machinery, accommodation, superstructure, rig, armament, fire control, fittings, ground tackle, ship's boats and finally aircraft arrangements.

The inclusion of an expanded view of the clip which secured the quarterdeck hatch gives an indication of the attention to detail put into this book and, once again, I congratulate both author and publishers for a job well done.

NM
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Great technical data and profiles..... April 2 2002
By "fullmooninthesky" - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
As far as I am concerned, the book is outstanding. The diagrams of the battlecruiser are superb. As a modeler, the book shows clearly, the amount of detail that can be achieved. The profile inside the jacket is cool. For the HMS Hood fan, the book is right up their alley.
The first "Anatomy," and still one of the best April 21 2015
By Daryl Carpenter - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Looking for technical details of HMS Hood, her machinery, her hull structure, and armament? This book is the best place to start. The first title in Conway's long-running "Anatomy of the Ship" series, it's still one of my favorite warship monographs. A 15 page introduction provides details on the evolution of the design, and fairly detailed descriptions of the hull structure, machinery, armament, fire control systems, and anchor gear. It also includes a detailed timeline of modifications and refits, and tables providing specifications of the ship's guns, boats, armor protection, and fire control systems. 23 photographs are included in the next section, including some interesting shots taken while fitting out at John Brown and a number of interior shots taken in 1932.

The rest of the book consists entirely of keyed drawings of the ship. These range from overview deck plans and sections, to perspective views of the hull structure, cutaways of important pieces of machinery, plans depicting the evolution of the superstructure, detailed diagrams showing the interior arrangement of the 15-inch turrets, and numerous diagrams of the ship's boats, ground tackle, deck fittings, and aircraft launching arrangements. Considering that this was the first "Anatomy," the level of detail and the quality of the drawings is frequently stunning. Although some of them are a little crude, Roberts hits it out of the park when it comes to detail. There's all kinds of little morsels for ship buffs to chew on here, ranging from sectional views of the stern casting, a depiction of the fittings on a boiler steam drum, to a closeup of the clip on an armored hatch, and a perspective view showing the clinker construction of a 32 foot cutter. For the most part, the drawings are detailed, sharp, and easy to follow. I also appreciate that Roberts notes when items were either added, moved, or removed from the ship in the plans of the superstructure.

As nice as John Roberts' anatomy on HMS "Dreadnought" is, this one is a bit more appealing visually, and includes more details on individual machinery components (feed pumps, magazine cooling system, exhaust fans, etc.) and deck fittings. I wouldn't call this book "high art" by any stretch, but I've probably spent dozens of hours poring over these plans, studying every little detail. Highly recommended for fans of 20th century capital ships.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Superb subject coverage Aug. 30 2010
By Raphael A. Riccio - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This relatively short book manages to cram an impressive amount of information about the battle cruiser "Hood" into its pages. Only about 15 pages of text are devoted to the background, building, operational history and sinking of "Hood;" the rest of the book essentially consists of photographs (about 13 pages) and drawings (by far the bulk of the book). The drawings are rendered superbly by John Roberts; one has to wonder where someone like Roberts finds the information, let alone the patience, to put together such detail. This book is not a long, exhausitive operatinal history of the ship, but rather, as the title suggests ("Anatomy of the Ship - the Battlecruiser Hood") goes into minute detail on the ship's construction elements, from keel to topmast, stem to stern. Well worth the price.


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