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Angela's Ashes Hardcover – Sep 5 1996


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Scribner; First Edition edition (Sept. 5 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0684874350
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684874357
  • Product Dimensions: 24.3 x 16.1 x 2.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 658 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,494 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #205,426 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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My father and mother should have stayed in New York where they met and married and where I was born. Read the first page
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4.5 out of 5 stars
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Just another reader on April 28 2005
Format: Paperback
Yes....it's about an Irish childhood, according to Mr. McCourt the worst childhood you could ever have in those years.
I am just one of the millions that have read this book, making me one of McCourt's fan.
Why I like this book?. Firt of all, I am no Irish (I'm an asian) ; I had no idea how bad growing up in Europe would be like in those days. I've seen movies and all ...but with this book, I can actually not only picture his life, but feeling the hardship he and his family went through. He showed me very clearly life in Ireland was at the time...and at the same time, showed me how beautiful Ireland is too !.
It made me realize, no matter what you are, where you come from, who you are, what your belief is,..the concept of life is the same everywhere. He made me looked back on my own childhood and really value it.
I have also read the sequel "'Tis"...and I can't wait for the next one "The Teacher Man"..will be released in November this year!.
To me, he is a very one of a kind writer. I definitely agree when one of his professors told him he's got a 'rich past(childhood)'. I also like his way of writing...it's almost like he's speaking his mind right out to me when I'm reading it.
Frank McCourt is definitely one of my favourites.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By AP on Sept. 6 2012
Format: Paperback
My review's title deliberately refers to James Joyce's 'A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man'. Joyce is regarded as "the great Irish author" in several circles, which can make work by an Irish writer a response to his body of work. I read 'Angela's Ashes' as a story within the tradition of Joyce's novel for a few reasons. First, this book is about Frank McCourt's spiritual maturity, with a slight nod to his artistic temperament as well. Second, poverty, class, and religion are prominent themes in both books. Last, the narrative (excepting the first thirty or so pages) matures as the younger Francis does. However concrete these parallels are, McCourt only makes tacit homage to Joyce. 'Angela's Ashes' inverts the search for artistry, and favours Frank McCourt's personal ambition to overcome poverty. In that respect, it's an Irish-American memoir because of its focus on class and McCourt's own "American dream."
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Sept. 1 2012
Format: Paperback
This book is about the author's life living in extreme poverty in Ireland when he was growing up. It's blunt and often humourous despite the hardships that the family goes through just to survive. I loved the honesty in which the author told his story and I was taken into a world otherwise that I would never have known. Bravo!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Eshter Ruiz on Jan. 21 2004
Format: Paperback
Angela's Ashes, by Frank McCourt, is the story of an Irish Cathloic boy born in the United States who learns to adapt to the poverty stricken town of Limerick. Frank vividly recaps the disturbing events of his childhood, while keeping the reader hopeful right up to the last page. Although Frank has to take on the man of the house role, while his father drinks himself stupid, his determined will to survive pervails. This memoir is narrated in the first person by a young Frank who uses blunt language and childish syntax. After reading this book you will feel like you can overcome any obstacle you experience with a smile on your face.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sean Roberts on Jan. 24 2001
Format: Paperback
Mr McCourt was the unfortunate victim of a disease - his father's alcoholism - and not that fate worse than death, an Irish Catholic childhood.His story strains credibility;moreover, he perpetuates negative stereotypes. I loved his verbal agility and hated his manipulation of the reader
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 24 2000
Format: Paperback
McCourt's memoir perpetuates every existing stereotype about the Irish, and caters to a few new ones. He seems to indict an entire country for his family's most particular kind of poverty, which is misleading and unfair. James Joyce's works, with their less-than-flattering depictions of Dublin life, seem almost nationalistic in comparison. No non-Irish person should read this book believing that it represents the true state of affairs in Limerick, much less Ireland as a whole.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By k1818@bright.net on June 1 1999
Format: Audio Cassette
Having seen and heard Frank and Malachy McCourt on talk shows, I was anxious but trepeditious upon picking up this novel (memoir). Trepeditious because both of them seemed like con men to me. I think this is a whining, complaining, self seeking journey with an ending which bespeaks the true character of McCourt and his family, get-what-you-can, get laid, and get to America. My own Irish ancestors on my mother's side were just as poor, had just as much sickness, has their share of drunks, and their own personal tragedies. Did they resort to knocking Ireland, knocking the Catholic Church, making fun of native customs? No, their faith was a bedrock upon which their lives rested, their humor was directed toward themselves, not others, and their poverty was overcome by honest means--not by stealing. This book may have been on the New York Times best seller list for eternity. It was a waste of my time. McCourt has a lyrical Irish voice. Too bad it couldn't have been put to better use.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Not quite as compelling as 'The Glass Castle' by Jeannette Walls, but very interesting as a follow up. I'd recommend it.
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