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12 Angry Men (50th Anniversary Edition) (Bilingual) [Import]


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12 Angry Men (50th Anniversary Edition) (Bilingual) [Import] + To Kill a Mockingbird: 50th Anniversary Edition
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Product Details

  • Actors: Henry Fonda, Lee J. Cobb, Martin Balsam, John Fiedler, E.G. Marshall
  • Directors: Sidney Lumet
  • Writers: Reginald Rose
  • Producers: Henry Fonda, Cory Watson, George Justin, Meredith Trosper, Reginald Rose
  • Format: Black & White, Dubbed, Mono, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC, Import
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish
  • Dubbed: French
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: NR
  • Studio: MGM (Video & DVD)
  • Release Date: March 4 2008
  • Run Time: 96 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (112 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0010YSD7W


Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
Unbelievably this didn't win any oscars. It is original, dynamic, and can easily be related to today's social issues. Acting is also lightyears ahead of other noir films. If you haven't seen it, you should when possible.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This films was an excellent addition to those "must have" films you keep on DVD in your collection. Plus, the packaging is excellent.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This movie should be mandatory for a jury to watch! Great cast! Henry Fonda's greatest film! I've seen this countless times, it's THAT good!
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By Steven Aldersley TOP 50 REVIEWER on Feb. 29 2012
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
12 Angry Men (1957)
Drama, 96 minutes
Directed by Sidney Lumet
Starring Henry Fonda, Lee J. Cobb and Martin Balsam

Sidney Lumet passed away in 2011, but he left us with 72 films, shorts or TV series. This was his first feature for the big screen and it's definitely among his best work.

For me, one of the signs of a good film is to take a subject in which I have no interest and hold my attention for the duration. The story takes place in one room, apart from a couple of minutes at the beginning and end of the film. It succeeds because of the strength of the dialogue and the acting ability of all involved.

After a very compact 96 minutes in which no scene is wasted, the credits roll. I'm left with the feeling that I have just seen something important. The film deals with racism and highlights the good and bad points of the American justice system. Henry Fonda leads a strong cast and every member has a significant role to play.

Lumet used a variety of camera angles to make the viewer feel like a member of the jury and it's easy to be drawn in. This is one of those rare stories where dialogue is actually exciting. It's really something that has the potential to be enjoyed by any audience.

Criterion's recent Blu-ray release offers a wonderful presentation and includes a good supplemental package.
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By Andy on Feb. 21 2012
Format: DVD
An excellent classic movie. Seen it several times and now own it. Great film and bought it on the strength of demonstrating persuasive talking to my wife who is a teacher. Thought it may be useful for her students. Simple set, all done in one room and no names of characters are ever mentioned until the end. One bum note - there seemed to be a fault on my disc at chapter 19 so ended up skipping a couple of scenes. Worth watching.
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Format: DVD
The all star cast of this original movie version does the subject justice. It has compassion, anger, despair, hope and empathy in abundance.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ms. H. Sinton on June 15 2006
Format: DVD
This is a courtroom drama with a difference. Apart from a very brief scene in the courtroom itself, the film takes place in the jury's deliberation room. The whole film revolves around the deliberations of a jury in a murder case in which a guilty verdict will lead to the death penalty for the accused. Initially it all seems very clear-cut with an all male jury having decided on a the young mans guilt before they have even sat down, all that is except for one man (Henry Fonda). Although he believes the accused may have possibly committed the murder, his values and ethics won't allow him to agree with his fellow jurors without thrashing out all of the evidence. Gradually he forces the other men to confront the evidence in front of them and to admit the situation is not as clear cut as it seemed. At the same time they are brought face to face with their own prejudices.

Filmed in black and white and shot almost entirely in one room, this film allows the viewer to concentrate entirely on the dialogue with nothing to distract from the story. It is a credit to the acting skills of the cast and to the direction of Sidney Lument (in his directorial debut) that the film remains gripping throughout. This is drama at its best and still one of the finest, if not the finest, courtroom dramas to be found.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Michael on June 27 2004
Format: VHS Tape
What can I possibly say about this masterpiece? It is surely one of the greatest movies, a work full of layers of meaning, of symbolism, of psychological and artistic subtleties. You can wach this movie an infinite number of times, because each time you discover something new. I would just like to bring up one often neglected point. For me, this movie shows the shift in acting styles after World War II - a shift towards more naturalistic approach close to "method" acting. Many of the younger members of the cast - such as Martin Balsam and Jack Klugman - seem to belong to this new school. Just watch such things as Klugman's slow reaction when it dawns on him that Cobb is yelling at him, or the foreman (Balsam) as he "gives up" and sulks in the corner. The movie is full of wonderful and telling details such as these. I also think that the style of this film bears some relation to Italian Neo-Realism of the 40's and 50's (eg. stark setting, realistic dialogue, and filming in "real time", including seemingly mundane actions). And has anybody noticed that this movie obeys the "unities" of classical Greek drama (of time, place, etc.)?
And to those cynics who think that this is a movie about a clever man who manages to convince eleven men that a guilty youth is innocent - think again. I have actually lain awake at night worrying that the young man probably is, after all, guilty! But for the purpose of the film it doesn't matter. This is not a whodunnit; it is about human character and human behavior, the law, how our backgrounds color our attitudes, and countless other themes. And of course it is a showcase for twelve SUPERB actors.
(But please, who wrote the text on the back of the video cover? "Eleven jurors are convinced that the defendant is guilty of murder. The twelfth has no doubt of his innocence." WHAT?!! Did this person even watch the movie?!)
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