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Animal Rights


Price: CDN$ 22.95
Only 1 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Vanderbilt CA.
5 new from CDN$ 22.95 14 used from CDN$ 0.95
CDN$ 22.95 Only 1 left in stock. Ships from and sold by Vanderbilt CA.


Product Details

  • Audio CD (Feb. 11 1997)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Elektra Entertain.
  • ASIN: B000002HP1
  • Other Editions: Hardcover  |  Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #78,459 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Dead Sun
2. Someone To Love
3. Heavy Flow
4. You
5. Now I Let It Go
6. Come On Baby
7. Soft
8. Anima
9. Say It's All Mine
10. That's When I Reach For My Revolver
11. Alone
12. Face It
13. Old
14. Living
15. Love Song For My Mom
16. A Season In Hell

Product Description

Product Description

Limited Double CD Version featuring a Nine Track Bonus CD Titled 'little Idiot'.

Amazon.ca

One of techno's prime trendsetters, Moby flashed surprising rock chops on the Joy Division tribute Means to an End in 1995. Here he abandons the dance floor completely for a convincing stroll through a multitude of guitar-based styles. "Come on Baby" is the man's idea of trad rock, "Someone to Love" explodes like the best hardcore, and "Face It" is a swelling progressive epic. Animal Rights also includes Moby's ode to his roots, a cover of Mission of Burma's "That's When I Reach for My Revolver." --Jeff Bateman

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

By Martin A Hogan TOP 500 REVIEWER on June 14 2002
Format: Audio CD
This album is for the true Moby fan. It's very good, but stretches the limits in both directions with no middle ground.
Half of the tracks are frantic, near punk as Moby screams to a frenzied beat. The rest of the songs are mellow, relaxed and hypnotic. The best of these is the Eno-esque, "A Season In Hell". The remake of "That's When I Reach For My Revolver" is a great rock and roll number - and the only one like it on the album. Moby brings out the violin on "Love Song For My Mom" (literally) and it's hard to tell if it's synthesized or real. The best song (IMO) on the album is "Living", simply a pleasant song and worth the price of the entire CD.
I could have done without all the pontificating in the liner notes and the pleading message, "please listen to Animal Rights in its entirety at least once", however nice a gesture it was. It's the music that really counts here. Moby seems to have been unsure which direction to take here, but just a few of the songs make it worth the listen.
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By alexliamw on April 14 2002
Format: Audio CD
Whilst Animal Rights certainly isn't the best CD to introduce you to Moby, it certainly stands as an amazing testament to his ability to go rock. Moby was into punk as a teenager, and this CD harks back to his roots, with an intoxicating sound of guitar punk with just a dash of trippy beats added in to give it a distinct sound. Come on Baby and Someone to Love particularly stand out as fantastic tracks. There is a level of shine and discipline to this punk which makes it different to traditional punk music, but it only really serves to make the experiment sound even more interesting. Moby, as a truly excellent musician, plays guitar very well in addition to keyboards and all the other instruments he plays on his more recent classic Play and other older techno albums like Everything Is Wrong and I Like To Score. Even these albums show off some guitar work, and so it is fantastic to discover what it sounds like when Moby cranks up the volume of the guitar, puts it onto overdrive, and rocks out. And while there's a time for techno, pop and neo-classical from his other albums, sometimes rocking out is what you want to hear.
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Format: Audio CD
This review was actually 3 and a half stars. This was the album that followed Everything Is Wrong and preceded his movie album, I Like To Score. Those people who know Moby know this album as an infamous album. This was the album in which Moby shocked everyone including a lot of his fans by doing an album that was predominantly punk rock. Now, Moby is a great musician and I liked some of his other hard rock tracks like New Dawn Fades from I Like To Score and What Love from Everything Is Wrong, and there are definitely some highlights like Come On Baby, Soft, and That's When I Reach For My Revolver plus there are some ambient tracks like the first track and the last one. However, my big problem with this album is 2 things:
1) There are too many tracks that go on and on whether they be ambient or hard rock--examples of this include Say It's All Mine and Alone, both are over 10 minutes long. I know God Moving Over The Face Of The Waters was long but these 2 tracks are no GMOTFOTW.
2) I really like Moby when he does techno/dance/trance. Everything Is Wrong, I Like To Score, and of course, Play are great examples where he performs some classic tracks in this genre (Feeling So Real, Everytime You Touch Me, James Bond Theme, Oil 1, Honey, Southside, Run On, and Porcelain just to name a few).
I think Moby did this album to prove to his critics that he was more than some DJ that can mix songs, that he was actually a musician, and a talented one at that. However, he did not play to his strengths on this album. I would recommend this album to die-hard fans of his like me or those who like punk/hard rock. Don't be expecting Play or you will be severely disappointed.
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By Ericka Holmstrand on Oct. 31 2000
Format: Audio CD
Like many others, I cannot believe the reviews this album has gotten here. Yes, it is nothing like Play (although there are some instrumental, "quiet" tracks that maybe all the people trashing the album never got to that are more reminiscient of Play's style), but NO, it is not a bad album, or his worst, or anything like that. I personally divide Moby's music in my mind, and this album will always have the mental label "Angry Moby" attached to it. I originally bought the album for "That's When I Reach for My Revolver" which I heard for the first time in a mosh pit, but quickly realized it's close to my least favorite song on the album. "Come On Baby" and "Someone to Love" are favorites, and although I usually do skip one or two tracks when I listen to the album, I still choose to listen to Animal Rights more often then Play (but maybe that's because I hear half the songs from Play so often since they've been sampled for everything from car commercials to that awful TV show Veronica's closet). If you've ever been to a live performance by Moby (and enjoyed it), you'll probably like this album better than Play, which although a great work in itself just doesn't get you going the way this album does.
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Format: Audio CD
Fresh off of "Everything Is Wrong" in 1995, everyone expected Moby to remain in the world of dance/dj culture forever. They were wrong. In this album, Moby shatters his reputation as a prominent dj with shattering drum explosions and pulse-pounding guitar riffs. Moby is not just another boring fad. He is a talented musician who, in this album proves his can expiriment with a different sytle of music, and come out as always: surprising, astounding, and in the end, delighting his audience.
The album opens with a sweet snythsizer tune, then abruptly dives into heavy metal, with "Someone To Love" "Heavy Flow" and "You" The album then drifts back into classic Moby, with sweet melodies such as "Now I Let It Go" and "Old" (one of my favorite tracks). Unlike "Play", "Animal Rights" is not a flowing album. It is choppy and cut-up, as if we are experencing some kind of hidden sturggle within Moby's mind. He is passionate to DJ culture, yet feels reluctant to break away from his roots and scream against screeching guitars and pounding drums. In the end, the album fades away with dreamy and seductive tracks: "Living" "Love Song For My Mom" and "A Season In Hell" as if to say he's returned peacefully to his normal style. If you've just bought Play, and think that's all the man's got up his sleeve, you should consider "Animal Rights" because everything is wrong.
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