Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder (Incerto) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 32.60
  • List Price: CDN$ 52.00
  • You Save: CDN$ 19.40 (37%)
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder Audio CD – Audiobook, Unabridged


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Audio CD, Audiobook, Unabridged
"Please retry"
CDN$ 32.60
CDN$ 28.32 CDN$ 51.92

Join Amazon Student in Canada



Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Audio CD: 13 pages
  • Publisher: Random House Audio; Unabridged edition (Nov. 27 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0739370693
  • ISBN-13: 978-0739370698
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 13 x 4.2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 381 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #169,446 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A. D. Thibeault TOP 100 REVIEWER on Dec 9 2012
Format: Hardcover
*A full executive summary of this book is available at newbooksinbrief dot com.

The main argument: The concept of fragility is very familiar to us. It applies to things that break when you strike or stretch them with a relatively small amount of force. Porcelain cups and pieces of thread are fragile. Things that do not break so easily when you apply force or stress to them we call strong or resilient, even robust. A cast-iron pan, for instance. However, there is a third category here that is often overlooked. It includes those things that actually get stronger or improve when they are met with a stressor (up to a point). Take weight-lifting. If you try to lift something too heavy, you’ll tear a muscle; but lifting more appropriate weights will strengthen your muscles over time. This property can be said to apply to living things generally, as in the famous aphorism ‘what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger’. Strangely, we don’t really have a word for this property, this opposite of fragility.

For author Nassim Nicholas Taleb, this is a major oversight, for when we look closely, it turns out that a lot of things (indeed the most important things) have, or are subject to, this property. Indeed, for Taleb, all that lives, and all the complex things that these living things create (like societies, economic systems, businesses etc.) have, or must confront this property in some way. This is important to know, because understanding this can help us understand how to design and approach these things (and profit from them), and failing to understand it can cause us to unwittingly harm or even destroy them (and be harmed by them).
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Lillian Leese on Feb. 9 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Talbeb's contemplation on real knowledge. Under rigourous scrutiny, what do we really know? A profound book from one of today's most original thinkers. He addresses fundamental questions and suggests practical rules of thumb for dealing with the dilemmas of modern decision making, from medicine to investing. I had to read it twice, it turns coventional thinking on its head. One of the best books of the last 10 years.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Ian Robertson TOP 100 REVIEWER on Dec 12 2012
Format: Hardcover
Nassim Taleb has written a very worthy companion to his previous two popular books - Fooled by Randomness: The Hidden Role of Chance in Life and in the Markets and The Black Swan: Second Edition: The Impact of the Highly Improbable: With a new section: "On Robustness and Fragility". Taleb tells us that the three books "are non-overlapping chapters from [a] central idea, a main corpus focused on uncertainty, randomness, probability, disorder, and what to do in a world we don't understand." One need not have read the other two to enjoy this book, but those who haven't will likely find themselves back in the bookstore to catch up once they've finished Antifragile. The three books can stand alone, but as Taleb points out, are extremely complimentary.

Readers who enjoyed the previous two books will love this one, and as before Taleb's writing is long on narrative and short on formulas (the technical writing can be accessed free online in short, supporting documents); complex ideas served in easily digestible bites. His familiar, erudite (some would say high falutin') style is rich in stories, anecdotes, and of course philosophy and Mediterranean history. He is as cranky as ever, taking liberal shots at economists, bankers, MBAs and in particular Harvard (though he does reserve a soft spot for grandmothers, Steve Jobs and the Sopranos). He is also unusually frank in criticising well known thinkers and economists, though always from a point of principle rather than maliciously, sometimes by position and other times by name.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Tom R. Dawson on Jan. 19 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I suppose that the reason this book isn't more widely hailed as a masterpiece is that it is eccentric. The highest compliment I can pay the book is that it is the Tristram Shandy of decision theory. The reader must enter into a contract with the author to surrender to him, and give him the courtesy of mining his footnotes as you read. Those conditions met, the result is sustained brilliance cover to cover. Troublingly enough, he is correct in his eccentric thesis. The consequence of his being right is that most of the ways in which we think about decision making (and living our professional lives) are wrong-headed. I usually consume books at a great rate, but this one slowed me down. I read it an hour at a time, went off to mine the footnotes and then came back to it. I'll do the same again. He's another guy I'd like to sit in a cafe in Heraklion with and listen to through a half dozen whiskies.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Nicholas on Sept. 16 2013
Format: Hardcover
Review courtesy of [...]

What’s the opposite of fragility? Most people say robustness, resilience, or strength. Most people, says Taleb, are wrong. Fragility is to be weakened by uncertainty or volatility, while resilience is to be unaffected by volatility. What we need is something strengthened by volatility and change – something antifragile.

In antiquity, Taleb points out, he would rather be the hydra which regrew two heads when one was cut off, rather than the phoenix, which rose identical from the ashes when destroyed, or the Gordian Knot, which fell apart at the first unexpected shock (a sword, to be specific). It’s not enough to ignore volatility; we must love volatility.

That, in a nutshell, is Antifragile. Like all the best ideas, it’s a simple idea with immediate, important, and interesting consequences. In particular, Taleb argues that the modern world, in its quest for efficiency and optimization, has ignored the effects of volatility. As a result, shocks (Black Swans) have catastrophic consequences. When one hits, however, we ask the wrong question. We demand to know why we failed to predict the housing bubble or disease outbreak, instead of asking ourselves why we built a system that is tremendously vulnerable to such shocks.

Instead of eliminating centralization and vulnerability in our systems, like big corporations or big bureaucracies, however, we keep trying to predict the future, an endeavor doomed to failure. Shocks, as Taleb has argued in other books, are rare, and so attempting to predict them is impossible because they happen so rarely – we never have enough data points to draw conclusions. (For the economists reading, he believes in fat tails).
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Product Images from Customers

Most recent customer reviews

Search


Feedback