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Applying Use Cases: A Practical Guide (2nd Edition) Paperback – Mar 13 2001


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional; 2 edition (March 13 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0201708531
  • ISBN-13: 978-0201708530
  • Product Dimensions: 23.4 x 18.9 x 1.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 476 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #246,933 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Customer Reviews

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Scott Kidder on Oct. 24 2003
Format: Paperback
Over the last year I have come to love Use Cases ... I write them before embarking on any software development project, large or small. The first taste I got of Use Cases was in the "UML Distilled" book (Fowler, Scott).
My favorite aspect of "Applying Use Cases" is how it follows a hypothetical project from Inception to Transition phases. The authors provide the reader with a clear idea of how Use Cases fit into the software development process as a whole, rather than just providing some templates for producing Use Case documents without instructions on their use.
The best, and worst, thing about books in the Object Technology Series (of which "Applying Use Cases" and "UML Distilled" both belong to) is their brevity. The concepts are conveyed very clearly and concisely, but it feels like I should be getting more substance ... .
Overall, this is a wonderful book and belongs on the shelf of any Software Engineer or Project Manager. It goes well with "Extreme Programming Explained" and "A Practical Guide to Extreme Programming", two of my favorites in this genre.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dan Clarke on Nov. 12 2002
Format: Paperback
As someone who has followed the development of UML and Use Cases for the past several years and who is now confronted with a project needing definition, I find the Scheider-Winters book very helpful -- not only in applying Use Cases, but also in defining the project itself.
I chose this book because I know Geri Schneider-Winters as a professional (we worked together at UCSC Extension.) I was not disappointed.
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By A Customer on June 22 2004
Format: Paperback
An excellent book. Gustav Karner did a really good job, finding the solution of estimating resources for object oriented projects.
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Format: Paperback
Though small, thin, and expensive, this books packs a ton of useful information. It is well worth the price. UML is a complex subject and the authors do a great job with clear examples of what use cases (to a midlevel depth of complexity) should look like. Yes, the story that goes along with it is a bit hokey, but it makes for light reading between the mass of valuable and important data. I expect to use this a reference for quite a while.
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Format: Paperback
Given the proper instruction, working with use cases is not as hard as it may appear. Demonstrating them requires a large, detailed example to illustrate how complex structures can be reduced to understandable chunks. Therefore, the most critical part of any book on how to apply use cases is the choice of the system to model. That feature is what makes this book stand out.
The premise is that several people, with some experience in designing systems, but certainly not experts, decide to build an order processing system. Choosing a group of non-experts is a stroke of genius, since it allows the authors to use dialog based on the premise of learning as you go, which describes most of us. This approach makes it much easier to relate to their trials and tribulations as they plunge in over their head, only to be rescued by the proper applications of use cases.
Requirements are iteratively added as needed or discovered, demonstrating how iterative development is superior to others such as the waterfall. The developers are learning the background while constructing their system. Elaborating on their initial model is a slow and steady process, however it is not without the frequent step back. These glitches are presented in a realistic format with sections devoted to common mistakes made when using use cases.
A great deal of effort is also expended in describing how refined the use cases should be. One of the topics in the section on common mistakes is making the use cases too small. Like anything else, they can be split down to the point where they complicate rather than simplify. With no fixed rules to guide the process, you are forced to rely on more common sense notions. This is always hard, but some good, effective guidelines are given.
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By A Customer on Jan. 20 2001
Format: Paperback
Back when, this was probably an OK book for the real novice - easy reading. Nowadays there are better ones, the Cockburn and Kulak ones contain real information. Get this one as an adjunct to the others and for the real basic intro.
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Format: Paperback
This book will get you up to speed very quickly w/ the needed information to successfully write and use "use Cases". Although this is just one piece of the UML puzzle, this is a great piece to start out with!
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By A Customer on Nov. 13 2000
Format: Paperback
Summary: If you've got plenty of $$ go ahead and buy it to get a good, simplistic start but you will need more. I've been doing requirements for quite a few years now and am convinced that use cases are the way to go especially for interactive systems. The key reason being that it forces the analyst to focus on WHAT the system should do rather than the HOW it should do it(I fall in that trap quite often). This particular book uses a different writing method, more story telling in nature. Some people may like it ... I don't care for it personally because the time spent reading Jane and Billy's annoyingly pleasant and simplistic banter could be better spent playing with my kids. It does, however, get around to giving a good academic introduction to the topic but the lack of examples severely hinders it from living up to a level of "practicality" to warrant the inclusion of the word in its title in my opinion. If you are a "just give me some guidelines and show me some good examples and get out of my way" kind of person, this book will make good kindling for your next BBQ -- especially if your software will involve any remotely complex scenarios. Perhaps the problem is that I tend to conceptualize systems in too complex a manner ... but it would be nice if the book helped in that regard as well by educating me relative to pitfalls that may lead me to overcomplicate things. In the end (couldn't finish the book) I find myself still looking for a good book mostly one loaded with realistic, practical, applicable examples.
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