Auto boutiques-francophones Simple and secure cloud storage Personal Care Music Deals Store NFL Tools Furniture
The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 27.95
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Gift-wrap available.
The Apprenticeship of Dud... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz Audio Cassette – Abridged, Audiobook

23 customer reviews

See all 36 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Audio Cassette, Abridged, Audiobook
"Please retry"
CDN$ 27.95
CDN$ 27.95 CDN$ 111.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

No Kindle device required. Download one of the Free Kindle apps to start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, and computer.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.

Product Details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: BTC Audiobooks; Abridged edition (June 1 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0864922450
  • ISBN-13: 978-0864922458
  • Product Dimensions: 10.7 x 3.5 x 13.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 272 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,422,105 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Amazon

The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz is a novel about costs. How much will Duddy sacrifice to get what he wants? "Born with a rusty spoon in his mouth," Duddy is a hustler and a schemer, scrambling to acquire the idyllic lakefront property he thinks will raise him out of the Jewish ghetto of post-war Montreal, where "the boys grew up dirty and sad, spiky also, like grass beside the railroad tracks." In the hilarious and tragic progress of his career, Duddy--along with everyone around him--discovers how much he will pay for material success.

Duddy's Uncle Benjy sums him up as "two people": "The scheming little bastard I saw so easily and the fine intelligent boy underneath that your grandfather, bless him, saw." Simcha, the stern but adoring immigrant grandfather, becomes the locus for Duddy's battle with ends and means. An embodiment of old-world values, Simcha impresses upon Duddy the maxim, "A man without land is nobody," never anticipating the depths (lying, forgery, theft, manipulation) to which Duddy will stoop to acquire the resort land to launch his empire. Breaking Simcha's heart with his unscrupulous victory, Duddy loses the respect, and--at least emotionally--the life he wanted: "a boy can be two, three, four potential people, but a man is only one. He murders the others."

Duddy Kravitz is the novel that moved Mordecai Richler into the stable of major 20th-century novelists, and it did so at a time (1959) when "world famous" and "Canadian novelist" were mutually exclusive terms. Like so many of the anti-heroes of Richler's contemporaries John Updike and Philip Roth, Duddy is neither likeable nor forgettable. Sadly, or perhaps thankfully, Duddy is all too human. --Darryl Whetter --This text refers to the Mass Market Paperback edition.


"Paul Hecht had me laughing out loud." — National Post (2013-01-15)

"The audiobook combines music and sound effects with Paul Hecht's excellent narration and Duddy and all of his chutzpah are brought vividly to life." — Quill & Quire (2013-01-15)

"Hecht is an excellent narrator with a facility for voicing accents." — KLIATT (2013-01-15)

See all Product Description

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By ganesan s. on July 18 2004
Format: Paperback
richler's work is, though spiced with ample dose of humour, is a painful portrayal of the ruthless nature of human ambitions. the young jewish,motherless urchin, duddy has only one goal before him, to emulate 'jerry dingleman'-the boywonder of st.urbain, montreal.duddy takes a materialist interpretation of his zeyda's profound words of wisdom, "a man without land is nobody.' this fires duddy, to embark on scheme after scheme, to pursue his goal of possessing a lake and the land surrounding it. for that he is shameless enough to forge the signature of epileptic friend and to crush the love of yvette, the all-giving french-canadian girl friend. duddy doesn't believe in gew-gentile relationship either, after seeing how his doctor-brother was harrassed and hounded by the gentile circle. he is the jewish-avtar of nietzschen neo-man , one who is devoid of feelings like love and shame. duddy hardly bothers about the fate of ladders which he use to climb. unfortunately,for him, the end is important ; not human relationships, outside his family.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Scoopriches TOP 1000 REVIEWER on Sept. 22 2015
Format: Paperback
For a long long time I wanted to read Duddy.

A million years back I saw the film, and was okay with it.

But Duddy still beckoned to me, for literally decades and decades.

So finally I jumped into the life and times of the young Mr. Kravitz and came away with one big huge meh.

The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz was written by late Canadian icon Mordecai Richler and is considered by many to be a classic. Richler never truly admitted, far as I know, that Duddy was largely him, but I could see it being very truth.

My chief exposure to Richler was from his media appearances over the years talking about politics and culture, saying things that often infuriated the Quebec separatists and several others. His feisty nature was interesting and his intelligence, combined with an analytical wit, made Richler an important voice to be listened to.

But back to Kravitz, the maybe alias of Richler.

Duddy Kravitz is the tale of a teen boy in late 1940’s Montreal who wants to be a somebody, a somebody with money and power, because then he will get respect, from the community but mostly from his family.

To this end, Duddy is constantly running schemes legal and illegal, all to make lots and lots of money. This, along with a smart mouth and a bad attitude, gets him into loads of trouble. Once out of high school, Duddy keeps his plans agoing and suddenly comes upon the grandest plan of them all, this time involving land. This begins a rather lengthy quest to gain ownership of this land, by hook or by crook. And of course bad consequences.

The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz has two strikes against it and one strike for it from my reading.

Duddy Kravitz is very very very unlikable.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Troy Parfitt on July 7 2015
Format: Paperback
If you're looking for overlapping plots and literary pyrotechnics, you might want to try Richler's fiction after 1980 (i.e. Joshua Then and Now, Solomon Gursky Was Here, and Barney's Version), but for humour and a comparatively linear story, you can't do better than Duddy Kravitz, the novel that first made Richler famous. The story is clever: Duddy, marginalized and impoverished, working-class and academically challenged, with no mother and a "dope" for a father, graduates from high school without any prospects except slaving in his uncle Benjy's garment factory. However, while working as a waiter at a countryside resort he happens upon a lake and decides to buy it to have it developed. This is Duddy's ticket out of poverty and obscurity. With everyone against him, you can't help but root for him. But when it becomes clear that Duddy will do anything to achieve his dream, the question becomes: do you still support him and why? This is essentially a morality play back-dropped by absurdity and treachery. In between the laughs, it raises questions about social class, racism, and capitalism. It remains a Canadian classic.

Troy Parfitt is the author of War Torn: Adventures in the Brave New Canada.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
In a (1970) television interview Richler said that his best writing was the stuff that flowed out from him and did not require too much revision or re-writing. I think that a lot of that sort of "one-take" inspiration must have found its way into this fourth novel of his. As I read it, there was one word that kept recurring in my thoughts... "raw"! I don't think Richler is the type who had much use for a thesaurus in his study, and I say that in praise of his ability as a writer. Everything is just right up front and center with him, nothing embellished or re-written for the sake of eloquence. The result is sometimes brash, often vulgar... but all the while, it is very REAL and necessary to explain the impetuous character of Duddy. Very well written. Great bantering dialogue. Count how many times Richler puts the word "but" at the END of a sentence. It's bizarre.
This is a story of ambition run amok! A precocious upstart trying to satiate his obsessive perception of success. Duddy's particular obsession is this phrase that "a man without land is nobody!" Richler creates a fascinating (realistic, albeit despicable) character here in Duddy. There were a few redeeming moments, but most of the time I just wanted to strangle Duddy... in fact, my feelings for Duddy alternated between wanting to strangle him and then (next page) laugh at him. He's such a shyster! Often this story is hilarious, but it's really not funny. I see Duddy as a tragic figure. He consistently abuses the two people (Yvette and Virgil) who are trying the hardest to help him realize his dreams. Ultimately, Duddy has to face the fact that perhaps the only thing legendary about him are the stories that his father Max is already inventing down at Lou's Bagel and Lox Bar.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most recent customer reviews