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Ariadne Auf Naxos


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Product Details

  • Performer: Deborah Voigt, Natalie Dessay, Anne Sofie von Otter, Ben Heppner, Albert Dohmen, et al.
  • Orchestra: Staatskapelle Dresden
  • Conductor: Giuseppe Sinopoli
  • Composer: Richard Strauss
  • Audio CD (Aug. 21 2001)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Deutsche Grammophon
  • ASIN: B00005ND47
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #62,142 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Disc: 1
1. Ariadne auf Naxos, opera, Op. 60-II (TrV 228a) (revised version): Prologue: Orchestral Introduction
2. Ariadne auf Naxos, opera, Op. 60-II (TrV 228a) (revised version): Prologue: 'Mein Herr Haushofmeister!'
3. Ariadne auf Naxos, opera, Op. 60-II (TrV 228a) (revised version): Prologue: 'Du allmächtiger Gott! O du mein zitterndes Herz!'
4. Ariadne auf Naxos, opera, Op. 60-II (TrV 228a) (revised version): Prologue: 'Hast ein Stücker! Notenpapier?'
5. Ariadne auf Naxos, opera, Op. 60-II (TrV 228a) (revised version): Prologue: 'Ist schon geschehn. Wir sind bereit'
6. Ariadne auf Naxos, opera, Op. 60-II (TrV 228a) (revised version): Prologue: 'Nein, Herr, so kommt es nicht'
7. Ariadne auf Naxos, opera, Op. 60-II (TrV 228a) (revised version): Prologue: 'Ein Augenblick ist wenig - ein Blick ist viel'
8. Ariadne auf Naxos, opera, Op. 60-II (TrV 228a) (revised version): Prologue: 'Seien wir wieder gut'
9. Ariadne auf Naxos, opera, Op. 60-II (TrV 228a) (revised version): The Opera: OuvertÃ1/4re
10. Ariadne auf Naxos, opera, Op. 60-II (TrV 228a) (revised version): The Opera: 'Schläft sie?'
See all 15 tracks on this disc
Disc: 2
1. Ariadne auf Naxos, opera, Op. 60-II (TrV 228a) (revised version): The Opera: 'Großmächtige Prinzessin'
2. Ariadne auf Naxos, opera, Op. 60-II (TrV 228a) (revised version): The Opera: 'Hübsch gepredigt! Aber tauben Ohren!'
3. Ariadne auf Naxos, opera, Op. 60-II (TrV 228a) (revised version): The Opera: 'Ein schönes Wunder!'...'Ein reizender Knabe!'
4. Ariadne auf Naxos, opera, Op. 60-II (TrV 228a) (revised version): The Opera: 'Circe, kannst du mich hören?'
5. Ariadne auf Naxos, opera, Op. 60-II (TrV 228a) (revised version): The Opera: 'Theseus! Nein, nein?'
6. Ariadne auf Naxos, opera, Op. 60-II (TrV 228a) (revised version): The Opera: 'Das waren Zauberworte!'
7. Ariadne auf Naxos, opera, Op. 60-II (TrV 228a) (revised version): The Opera: 'Gibt es kein Hinüber?'

Product Description

Amazon.ca

Recorded in Dresden in December 2000, this new version of Strauss's Ariadne has become by default the last will and testament of Giuseppe Sinopoli. On April 20, 2001, the Venetian maestro collapsed in the middle of a performance in Berlin, victim of a heart attack at age 54. Since 1992, he had been principal conductor of the prestigious Dresden Staatskapell, which undertook a privileged collaboration with Richard Strauss himself in premiering nine of the composer's operas. There's no surprise, therefore, in the excellence exhibited by the orchestra on this recording, under the baton of a man who also had much experience in the works of Strauss.

Given its final version in 1916, Ariadne auf Naxos abandons the excess of Salome and Electra, orienting itself toward neoclassicism in its juxtaposition of the world of antique opera seria with that of the commedia dell'arte. The Prologue--with its theater within the theater setup--is a playful treatment of the theme of art versus reality and of sublime love versus frivolity, represented by the opposition between a young composer (Anne Sofie von Otter) and a saucy comedian, Zerbinetta (Natalie Dessay). The cast assembled here is exemplary and basically not to be surpassed today, with Deborah Voigt in her famous turn as the title character and Ben Heppner as Bacchus. --Franck Erikson

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Rodrigo on Sept. 19 2001
Format: Audio CD
Being a lover of this most beautiful of Strauss operas and a great fan of Sinopoli, I bought this disc in the first day it was released in the face of Earth, especially after having seen a couple of years ago Sinopoli conduct this same opera at La Scala, a performance broadcast in European radios. It apparently had all the elements to be a perfect recording and my highest level of expectation led to a great disappointment. The 4 star rating is due to the emotional aspect of my admiration to Sinopoli and the fact that this is his last operatic recording.
However, let's start with the positive aspects. First of all, congratulations to DG warmest recording that does full justice to the heavenly playing of the Staatskapelle Dresden. I could add to the good points that there is a technically accomplished group of singers here, but this leads me to the bad points.
This recording is a torso in the sense that the good shape is there, but the Muse didn't grant it a soul. To start with, Deborah Voigt is probably the Ariadne with fewer problems to sing the role, but her tone is so unvaried that her performance ends on being boring. I would listen to every other Ariadne. Also, there is a grainy quality to her tone that I would call un-straussian, it it was not for Maria Cebotari, who, by the way, had far more imagination than her. It is funny, for European reviewers were very cruel to Deborah Polaski's Ariadne in the lastest Salzburg performance. Nevertheless, she showed so much care, even despite her sometimes wide vibrato, to use a wide tonal palette to describe the predicaments of Ariadne, that I thought it was really touching. With Voigt, you get only the notes. Then there is Natalie Dessay, the best vocalization in this role in recent years.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ed Beveridge on Oct. 27 2001
Format: Audio CD
This recording, features four of my very favourite singers, so it would have to be pretty awful for me not to give it a five-star rating. I'm surprised, though to see some rather hostile reviews on these pages, as I must say I found it wonderful. It's not in the best taste to emblazon "Sinopoli's last recording" across the front of the box, but it is true and thankfully it is a fitting record of this ever-fascinating conductor.
My previous recording of choice was Kleiber (Janowitz utterly pellucid in the title role, Jess Thomas a heroic bacchus, Getzy a girlish but thinnish Zerbinetta) which had the chamber proportions of the piece perfectly represented. None of that here - we are in lush, big-house Strauss territory, but as is always the case Sinopoli looks beyond the lushness of the overarching melodies and gets into the fabric of the music. All of the witty details and leitmotifs are given their due. He allows plenty of space - some really expansive tempi - at lyrical moments but, as at the end of the prologue, really keeps things moving at other times. The recording quality is without fault, and the recording repays repeated listenings for the quality of the Dresden Stadtskapelle's playing. I have seldom heard the opera played with more refinement and skill.
As for the singers: well, it's a hand-picked cast and would be hard to better on record today. Casting this opera in the theatre is another matter - how would burly Ben Heppner's Bacchus look in person? Here he sounds thrilling, his beefy tenor riding with ease the strangling tessitura. No surprise to anyone who has heard his Enee, Lohengrin or Tristan, but glorious nonetheless.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Pèire Cotó on June 22 2011
Format: Audio CD
Dans Ariane à Naxos, Richard Strauss et son librettiste Hugo von Hofmannsthal construisent une oeuvre en deux parties: un Prologue se situe avant la représentation du premier opéra d'un jeune compositeur, chanté par une femme selon une convention fréquente, ensuite vient l'Opéra lui-même, dont le sujet est Ariane à Naxos (Ariadne auf Naxos), Ariane abandonnée par Thésée et récupérée par le dieu Dyonisos, nommé Bacchus à la latine, alors que la jeune princesse le prend pour Hermès, dieu messager et porteur des âmes des morts.

Le Compositeur apprend dans le Prologue que son mécène, un homme richissime mais sans culture, impose un spectacle de Comedia dell'Arte, dont le personnage principal est la frivole Zerbinetta, en même temps que l'opéra tragique !
On peut remarquer l'ambivalence de Hofmannsthal et surtout de Strauss, qui défendent d'abord la pureté de l'Art par la bouche du Compositeur, puis ne craignent pas de contredire ce dernier en organisant l'harmonie, ou du moins la juxtaposition, de deux mondes culturels si opposés, alors qu'une autre possibilité aurait été une pure et simple cacophonie. Le librettiste reprochait d'ailleurs à Strauss son goût prédominant pour les comédiens italiens et l'infidèle Zerbinetta, au détriment de l'absolu représenté par Ariane, qui devait triompher...

Je continue à préférer la vieille version de Karajan (1954), même si celle de Sinopoli est probablement la meilleure depuis 30 ou 40 ans.
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