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At Home In Mitford: Radio Theater Audio Cassette – Abridged, Audiobook


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Audio Cassette, Abridged, Audiobook
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Product Details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: Tyndale House Publishers; Abridged edition (Sept. 15 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1589970012
  • ISBN-13: 978-1589970014
  • Product Dimensions: 18 x 11.3 x 4.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 386 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (323 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,203,014 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Amazon

Father Tim, a cherished small-town rector, is the steadfast soldier in this beloved slice of life story set in an American village where the grass is still green, the pickets are still white, and the air still smells sweet. The rector's forthright secretary, Emma Garret, worries about her employer, as she sees past his Christian cheerfulness into his aching loneliness. Slowly but surely, the empty places in Father Tim's heart do get filled. First with a gangly stray dog, later with a seemingly stray boy, and finally with the realization that he is stumbling into love with his independent and Christian-wise next-door neighbor. Much more than a gentle love story, this is a homespun tale about a town of endearing characters-- including a mysterious jewel thief--who are as quirky and popular as those of Mayberry, R.F.D. --Gail Hudson --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From Publishers Weekly

The first two novels in Karon's Mitford series chronicle the everyday eccentricities of a small North Carolina town.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Kristi Lewandowski on March 27 2004
Format: Paperback
At Home in Mitford is the first book in the Mitford series. It introduces you to the major characters (and quite a few minor ones) that Karon develops in the later Mitford books. I didn't continue to turn the pages of this book because the plot was so riveting I couldn't put it down. I kept reading because I needed to know what happened to Father Tim and the other citizens of this charming little town. Karon does a wonderful job of making the reader care about these lovable characters.
Think of this book as a cozy mystery with no dead body. It does, however, have a jewel theft, a kidnapping, a runaway and several medical crises to keep you turning the pages. If this isn't enough, there is also a romance and an old secret that comes to light, so it has something for everyone. I can't wait to read the rest of the series.
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Format: Paperback
This is such a wonderful story. I never really thought how busy a clergy man's (or woman's) life is and how much they actually do in their chosen vocation. Father Tim, the rector, in Mitford is the central character. He is just turning sixty at the beginning of the story and has reached a time in his life that he has lost a little of the joy and fulfillment he has always felt before. He is need of a vacation, which he has not taken in years, but which he always finds excuses to not take-he is getting burned out. Enter a huge bad-mannered dog (who is only controlled by hearing scriptures from the bible spoken to him) who has decided to adopt Father Tim, a young untamed boy, a new attractive neighbor, a jewel theft, a sixty year old secret love story, missing food and much more and you have a story that is so wonderful and so human and so enjoyable. I felt the urge to go to my bible and eagerly look up the many stories on Jesus because it made me feel so close to him and loved by him. Don't make the mistake that it is a preachy type story from what I just said but rather a feel good story that makes you want to reach out. The characters are all portrayed as actual everyday people we know ourselves with all their foibles and goodness combined. If you want a book that will leave you with a good contented feeling then this book will fullfill your wishes.
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By A Customer on Nov. 12 2003
Format: Paperback
I was looking for something to read after being charmed and entertained by Van Reid's Moosepath League novels. My sister, who loves the Moosepath books too, suggested Jan Karon. I will admit that I resisted for quite some time. I had the idea that they were probably "women's" books, but nothing could be further from the truth. Any really good book is above such pigeonholing. This one certainly is. Like Mr. Reid's books they explore what a minister I once knew called the "mystery of kindness." Ms. Karon's Episcopalian minister, Father Tim, is one of those gentle souls who seems a little clueless in the ways of the world but who turns out to be as wise as anyone. Surrounding him are a host of memorable characters, a lot of small town skullduggery, and the possibility of middle-aged romance. It is amazing how many of these elements describe the Moosepath novels, though the writing styles of the two authors are very different! Mr. Reid's is a little more old fashioned. There's some basis for comparison with the Andy Griffith Show, too.
So if you're a guy! And if you like a good chuckle and you don't need to have someone being murdered on every other page, don't let the cozy covers and all the women raving about these books keep you away.
But now that I've read "Mrs. Roberto," after I read all the Mitford books, what do I read next?
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By Larrissa Vinge on July 25 2003
Format: Paperback
At Home in Mitford is the first in a series of books written by Jan Karon about a small town in North Carolina. The main character is Father Tim who has a parish in Mitford, and the book is filled with wonderful characters from the town. It is a cozy and enjoyable ride getting to know Father Tim and the rest of the townspeople -- from stray dogs to a boy in need of direction, romance to encounters with a jewel thief, and a lovable but definitely offbeat little old lady.
Jan Karon left her successful career in the fast-paced world of advertising and moved to Blowing Rock, North Carolina which she credits as the inspiration for Mitford, not the actual characters but the feel of a small village. She is able to make you feel like you've been to the main street grill and that you can actually smell the flowers in the town gardens.
The character development of the townspeople was very good; you want to know them more and more and what happens to them. Father Tim is both pleasantly multi-dimensional and not totally predictable.
The "bad guys" characters could have been developed more thoroughly, but perhaps that will come further into the series.
I recommend this book for a happy and comfortable read, somewhat like drifting around a swimming pool on a float, peaceful and agreeable with a splash of excitement
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Format: Paperback
Jan Karon vividly brings the citizens of Milford, North Carolina to life in the first installment of her amicable series that understandably achieved massive popularity. While the subplots concerning an international jewel theft and a dognapping vignette both seem extraneous and a tad farfetched, the uplifting novel more than succeeds in paying homage to the proudly quotidian.
The three-dimensional characters are all similar to everyday folks whom readers will know. Interestingly, the protagonist is a sixtyish never-married minister--not the typical lead character in current novels. Further deviating from the stipulations of modern day literature, he does not live a double life, engage in a tawdry affair, betray his duties to the church, or spout new age babble under the obnoxious guise of religious inclusion. He is a dedicated Episcopalian and all Christians and non-Christians will admire his commitment to his vocation.
What makes the desultory anecdotes referenced above all the more distracting is their complete lack of necessity to the plot. The book's tribute to the mundane is captivating enough without contrived plot twists to build drama.
The prose maintains eloquence throughout with its wholesome simplicity and on a few occasions the author's wording reaches rhapsodic heights. Certain sentences are so powerful that they not only conjure up palpable scenes, they nearly pop out of the book and act out the setting for the reader. At one point she describes an unwelcome rain with the hopeful undertone "every drop that fell contained the promise of another leaf, another blossom, another blade of grass." For transitional purposes she writes "early the following morning the leaden skies cleared, the sun came out and the village stirred briskly.
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