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At Home in the World Hardcover – Sep 11 2004


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 266 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Collins Canada; 1 edition (Sept. 11 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0002006650
  • ISBN-13: 978-0002006651
  • Product Dimensions: 21.6 x 15.2 x 2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 386 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #759,513 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Paperback
Jennifer Welsh's contribution to this often ignored topic of Canada's future in foreign policy is very important. She brings a three dimensional approach to the discussion and the best work of the book is on the realistic and very pragmatic discussion of the role Canada should play with the US. The missing thrust to her view on using leverage in negotiation is for Canada to strongly promote the oil reserves in Canada (2nd in the world ahead of Iraq and Kuwait) to the US suggesting using a fraction of the cost of securing the Middle East to developing better ways to extract the oil from heavy sands would make this a far superior approach to supplying the US with oil. This would give Canada great trade leverage. Where Jennifer fails badly is her view on the military and strengthening it. Even her afterword defense is weak and the book index doesnt even have General Rick Hillier in it. This exposes Jennifer's academic and remote view of the situation. Nonetheless, a very valuable book for all.
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By Robert McInnis on Oct. 11 2004
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Dr. Welsh demonstrates a connectedness to her country that can only be achieved by viewing it from a distance. This nexus generation look at foreign relations offers much more hope than the usual propoganda. The theory of being an exemplar as a country has historical backing and we can embrace it as part of our own lives. Jennifer shifts from a macro view to a micro explanation seamlessly and captures a direction for this century - a way home. This should be on Pierre Pettigrew's nightstand and a must for polisci and international students.
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1 of 5 people found the following review helpful By sean s. on Jan. 13 2005
Format: Hardcover
Jennifer Welsh is clearly a very intelligent woman, and she makes some good points in her book. However, what Canada's role in the world should be is a very controversial topic at this point in history, because the world is in the process of shifting from a unipolar to a multipolar distribution of power.
In the year 2000, few people would have been able to predict the bizarre string of events which started with September 11, 2001 and the equally bizarre American reaction to this attack. Benjamin Barber had correctly predicted a "Jihad vs. McWorld"; Michael Adams had correctly predicted that the US would continue to drift toward right-wing Christian evangelism. But the way all of this has played out in the attack on Iraq and the response to this attack around the world was arguably impossible to accurately foresee.
Canada is left in the difficult position of being tied to the United States in terms of economics, while being tied to Western Europe in terms of its postmaterialist values (cf. Jeremy Rifkin's European Dream).
The fundamentalist Muslim threat is real. However the evangelical Christian threat is also real. Both groups are keen on seeing the world as being engaged in an apocalyptic "Clash of Civilizations", an interpretation hard to believe and even harder to desire for Canadians and Europeans whose values continue to progress, rather than to regress to religious barbarism.
Jennifer Welsh wants our future course to "be rooted in our history". Unfortunately history is not necessarily a reliable guide in a time of paradigm shift.
Historically Germany was "the bad guy" but this is clearly no longer the case. And historically, at least from Canadians' perspective, the US was the good guy.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Model Citizen Oct. 11 2004
By Robert McInnis - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Dr. Welsh demonstrates a connectedness to her country that can only be achieved by viewing it from a distance. This nexus generation look at foreign relations offers much more hope than the usual propoganda. The theory of being an exemplar as a country has historical backing and we can embrace it as part of our own lives. Jennifer shifts from a macro view to a micro explanation seamlessly and captures a direction for this century - a way home. This should be on Pierre Pettigrew's nightstand and a must for polisci and international students.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Working from outdated assumptions Jan. 13 2005
By sean s. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Jennifer Welsh is clearly a very intelligent woman, and she makes some good points in her book. However, what Canada's role in the world should be is a very controversial topic at this point in history, because the world is in the process of shifting from a unipolar to a multipolar distribution of power.
In the year 2000, few people would have been able to predict the bizarre string of events which started with September 11, 2001 and the equally bizarre American reaction to this attack. Benjamin Barber had correctly predicted a "Jihad vs. McWorld"; Michael Adams had correctly predicted that the US would continue to drift toward right-wing Christian evangelism. But the way all of this has played out in the attack on Iraq and the response to this attack around the world was arguably impossible to accurately foresee.
Canada is left in the difficult position of being tied to the United States in terms of economics, while being tied to Western Europe in terms of its postmaterialist values (cf. Jeremy Rifkin's European Dream).
The fundamentalist Muslim threat is real. However the evangelical Christian threat is also real. Both groups are keen on seeing the world as being engaged in an apocalyptic "Clash of Civilizations", an interpretation hard to believe and even harder to desire for Canadians and Europeans whose values continue to progress, rather than to regress to religious barbarism.
Jennifer Welsh wants our future course to "be rooted in our history". Unfortunately history is not necessarily a reliable guide in a time of paradigm shift.
Historically Germany was "the bad guy" but this is clearly no longer the case. And historically, at least from Canadians' perspective, the US was the good guy. However, according to a recent poll in Time Canada (November 1, 2004), Canadians now see the US more as "World Bully" (54%) than as "World police officer" (37%).
Where do Canadians go from here? Not at all obvious.

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