CDN$ 16.30
  • List Price: CDN$ 26.00
  • You Save: CDN$ 9.70 (37%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 8 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

At the Sharp End: Canadians Fighting the Great War 1914-1916 Paperback – Sep 29 2009


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 16.30
CDN$ 16.30 CDN$ 29.00

Up to 90% Off Textbooks

Frequently Bought Together

At the Sharp End: Canadians Fighting the Great War 1914-1916 + Shock Troops: Canadians Fighting the Great War 1917-1918 + The Necessary War Volume One
Price For All Three: CDN$ 57.64


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought



Product Details

  • Paperback: 608 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Canada (Sept. 29 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0143055925
  • ISBN-13: 978-0143055921
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 3.9 x 22.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 771 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #6,978 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

TIM COOK is the Great War historian at the Canadian War Museum, as well as an adjunct professor at Carleton University. His books have won numerous awards, including the 2008 J.W. Dafoe Prize for At the Sharp End and the 2009 Charles Taylor Prize for Literary Non-Fiction for Shock Troops. In 2013, he received the Pierre Berton Award for popularizing Canadian history. He lives in Ottawa with his family.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is an amazing book. It's detailed, oh so detailed, and written in a way that makes it an engaging read.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
I read a lot of military history, and I've come to know that many military historians are BORING writers. Pierre Berton is great, but Tim Cook is maybe better; equally readable while not as rah-rah-rah. This book - and its equally excellent sequel - break the mold. This book is a well-written, brilliantly researched account of a neglected history. Cook doesn't just talk battles, he talks people, lives and society in the trenches. Don't be put off by the length; it's worth your time.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
Easy to read book on Canadian Corps July 26 2014
By Matthew Lerner - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
As Cook makes clear in his introduction, it is not an exhaustive look at Canada during the war. It solely focuses on the Canadian Corps, the army faction that fought; there is nothing about the air corps, navy, home front, and aside from brief mentions of Sam Hughes (minister of militia until 1916), no political details. As the title states, it starts from the Canadian entry into the war alongside the UK in 1914, and ends with the conclusion of the Battle of the Somme in October 1916.

The writing is very clear and straight-forward, and makes great use of quotations from memoirs and letters from soldiers at the front. Cook does a good job to present the horrors that the soldiers had to face, making constant references to the conditions of the trenches, often noting the presence of decaying bodies and human remains scattered about. Naturally, the artillery that characterised the front is also detailed, sometimes preceding the mention of the dead and wounded.

The individual is a constant theme throughout the book. As Cook makes heavy use of soldier's writings, he focuses on them at times; for example, in several instances he will go to lengths detailing how various soldiers acted during a battle, giving the reader a close-up perspective on how it felt. This has a certain effect, amplified as some of these accounts are closed by the somber note that the soldier was later wounded or, quite often, killed later on. Though Cook focuses on the front-line soldiers, he also takes time to detail the officer corps, noting the political aspects that gripped the leadership of the Canadian military to some extent.

Though heavily focused on the battles the Canadians took part in (Second Ypres, St. Julien, Festubert, Somme, to name some), Cook also spends a good amount detailing the other aspects of the war. Chapters explaining the construction and maintenance of the trench system, the rotation of units, their training, and the medical system are just some of the topics covered, giving a more rounded and nuanced impression of life for the soldiers.
Tim Cook manages to write a fascinating and very readable book on Canada's role in World War One, telling a story that cries out March 26 2014
By Brad W - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Tim Cook manages to write a fascinating and very readable book on Canada's role in World War One, telling a story that cries out to be retold. For some reason or other Canadians have forgotten that the Canadian Army was the elite fighting force in the Great War and this book is a reminder to us all. It is one of three books written by Cook on the First World War. This one covers 1914-1916, the period in which the CEF comes into existence and takes its basic form. It includes a lot of colourful political battles between Sam Hughes and well, everyone else. Cook has another book on the battles between Sam Hughes and General Curry but this book covers a period in which Hughes and Curry were on relatively good terms while Sam Hughes was taking on the British military establishment in the usual Hughes manner--meaning with manic energy. The book includes portraits of many Canadian and British leaders of the time that helped shape the war. I have to say that I admired how Cook managed to juggle the different stories, moving from the British high command, the British government, to the emerging Canadian generals, Prime Minister Borden in Ottawa, Sam Hughes, General Byng, etc. With the century mark coming up on the beginning of World War One it is one of the books that you ought to read. Tim Cook's three books are probably the best books on Canada's role in W W 1; the best that I have ever read anyhow, and I think I've read it all. It can easily be read by the average reader, but serious enough to please the palate of a historian.

Look for similar items by category


Feedback