Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
or
Amazon Prime Free Trial required. Sign up when you check out. Learn More
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Tell the Publisher!
I'd like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Atomic Light (Shadow Optics) [Paperback]

Akira Mizuta Lippit

Price: CDN$ 24.69 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
Want it delivered Tuesday, September 23? Choose One-Day Shipping at checkout.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover --  
Paperback CDN $24.69  
Save Up to 90% on Textbooks
Hit the books in Amazon.ca's Textbook Store and save up to 90% on used textbooks and 35% on new textbooks. Learn more.
Join Amazon Student in Canada


Book Description

Dec 25 2005
Dreams, x-rays, atomic radiation, and “invisible men” are phenomena that are visual in nature but unseen. Atomic Light (Shadow Optics) reveals these hidden interiors of cultural life, the “avisual” as it has emerged in the writings of Jorge Luis Borges and Jacques Derrida, Tanizaki Jun’ichirô and Sigmund Freud, and H. G. Wells and Ralph Ellison, and in the early cinema and the postwar Japanese films of Kobayashi Masaki, Teshigahara Hiroshi, Kore-eda Hirokazu, and Kurosawa Kiyoshi, all under the shadow cast by the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. 

Akira Mizuta Lippit focuses on historical moments in which such modes of avisuality came into being—the arrival of cinema, which brought imagination to life; psychoanalysis, which exposed the psyche; the discovery of x-rays, which disclosed the inside of the body; and the “catastrophic light” of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, which instituted an era of atomic discourses. 

With a taut, poetic style, Lippit produces speculative readings of secret and shadow archives and visual structures or phenomenologies of the inside, charting the materiality of what both can and cannot be seen in the radioactive light of the twentieth century. 

Akira Mizuta Lippit is professor of cinema, comparative literature, and Japanese culture at the University of Southern California. He is the author of Electric Animal: Toward a Rhetoric of Wildlife (Minnesota, 2000).

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Univ Of Minnesota Press; 1 edition (Dec 25 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0816646112
  • ISBN-13: 978-0816646111
  • Product Dimensions: 23 x 16 x 1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 204 g
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #645,214 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.ca
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  1 review
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Phenomenology meets Physics June 30 2009
By Z. Cheney - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This is a thoughtful, rather original treatment of light and space in cinematic media that effectively weds the visible with the invisible, the real with the unreal, the phenomenological with the physical. If you expect philosophy, you will find a kind of poetry here. Lippit wallows in a liminal space, finding and expanding fuzzy in-between areas that have been problematic or neglected in cinema studies. Accessibility isn't Lippit's main priority; nor is coherence, strictly speaking. Instead, he submerges his thought in the present zeitgeist and observes the numerous dialectics inherent in the physical world and exploited by cinema.

Look for similar items by category


Feedback