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Attila and the Nomad Hordes Paperback – Sep 27 1990


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 64 pages
  • Publisher: Osprey Publishing (Sept. 27 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0850459966
  • ISBN-13: 978-0850459968
  • Product Dimensions: 18.4 x 0.4 x 24.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 227 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #122,095 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

David Nicolle was born in 1944 and worked for the BBC, including the overseas broadcasting service before returning to university, obtaining his PhD in Edinburgh. He subsequently taught at Yarmouk University in Jordan, since which he has contributed a substantial number of Osprey titles. He is a specialist in medieval arms and armour and has written several books as well as numerous articles for specialist journals.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Of all the conquerors who swept out Central Asia, two names stand out in European memory-Attila the Hun and Genghis Khan the Mongol. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By ottoman on March 10 2001
Format: Paperback
Osprey books are mainly aimed at wargamers who who want to know what their armies should look like - hence the emphasis is on glossy exciting artwork. This book certainly scores in that department, and it's also well written & researched, as you'd expect from David Nicolle. He digs up a number of surprising & unusual details, eg the fact that the Huns had become an infantry army by the time they invaded Gaul & the Pechenegs being described as "clean-shaven" (funny, I thought they were famous for their shaggy beards!) Weak points include a rather amateur-looking map of the steppes which doesn't really help you to follow the text & some very poor & unclear photos (often a problem with Osprey). I was disappointed too by the lack of info about wagon laagers & (Pecheneg) war wagons. But I guess the main problem is that its trying to cover so much in too few pages. Obviously nobody's going to write an Osprey book just on the Pechenegs or the Khazars etc but it can be quite frustrating to read abook that only gives "the tip of the iceberg".
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By Munir on July 19 2002
Format: Paperback
Even if only the tip of the iceberg, Nicolle's work is certainly enjoyable for readers with only a casual interest in the subject. Despite its title, this book deals not particularly with the Huns, but with the Turco-Mongol nomads of Central Asia in general (the author adds in the forest peoples of Siberia). The influence that these hardy horsemen of the steppes had on military science and even chivalry was staggering. These people, it would seem, practically invented warfare. Even the oath on the sword taken by European knights was apparently borrowed from the nomad Turks. Nicolle's general discussion is followed by profiles of the nomad groups between the Huns and Genghis Khan (Kipchaks, Bulgars, Seljuks, Karakhanids), including cultural details (they were no mere barbarians). The color drawings were beautiful and intricate, right down to the tiny brass bells decorating the Turkic warrior's spear. Overall, it's a colorful and fascinating introduction to the nomads of Central Asia.
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By A Customer on July 4 2000
Format: Paperback
I like osprey books thoughit's a sortof short but always contains many useful text,maps, beautiful plates particulary MR.McBride's ones .this book explains well about history and thier influence to Western History nevertheless, can not provide high level of information. but anyway,it's worth readingand it probably helps you .
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By Saif T. Beg on June 23 2005
Format: Paperback
This is a very good source for western readers to learn about the Huns without them going into to much details. It is a good source for thier tatics, weapons and other stuff. A 5/5 for this one.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 10 reviews
29 of 30 people found the following review helpful
Nomads of Central Asia July 19 2002
By Munir - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Even if only the tip of the iceberg, Nicolle's work is certainly enjoyable for readers with only a casual interest in the subject. Despite its title, this book deals not particularly with the Huns, but with the Turco-Mongol nomads of Central Asia in general (the author adds in the forest peoples of Siberia). The influence that these hardy horsemen of the steppes had on military science and even chivalry was staggering. These people, it would seem, practically invented warfare. Even the oath on the sword taken by European knights was apparently borrowed from the nomad Turks. Nicolle's general discussion is followed by profiles of the nomad groups between the Huns and Genghis Khan (Kipchaks, Bulgars, Seljuks, Karakhanids), including cultural details (they were no mere barbarians). The color drawings were beautiful and intricate, right down to the tiny brass bells decorating the Turkic warrior's spear. Overall, it's a colorful and fascinating introduction to the nomads of Central Asia.
19 of 22 people found the following review helpful
Just the tip of the iceberg March 10 2001
By ottoman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Osprey books are mainly aimed at wargamers who who want to know what their armies should look like - hence the emphasis is on glossy exciting artwork. This book certainly scores in that department, and it's also well written & researched, as you'd expect from David Nicolle. He digs up a number of surprising & unusual details, eg the fact that the Huns had become an infantry army by the time they invaded Gaul & the Pechenegs being described as "clean-shaven" (funny, I thought they were famous for their shaggy beards!) Weak points include a rather amateur-looking map of the steppes which doesn't really help you to follow the text & some very poor & unclear photos (often a problem with Osprey). I was disappointed too by the lack of info about wagon laagers & (Pecheneg) war wagons. But I guess the main problem is that its trying to cover so much in too few pages. Obviously nobody's going to write an Osprey book just on the Pechenegs or the Khazars etc but it can be quite frustrating to read abook that only gives "the tip of the iceberg".
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Wrong title Dec 18 2006
By Anibal Madeira - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Although this book clarifies several issues and raises the debate in certain subjects (like the Hsung-Nu; are they the ancestors of the Huns, even with all the different physical, social and cultural differences?), it suffers of a major drawback...it doesn't have almost anything on the Huns, and only half a page and a colour plate on Attila and his army; considering that the title is "Attila and the Nomad Hordes" this is a problem (and the re-issue under the name "Attila the Hun" is outright lying").

If titled just "Nomad Hordes", this would be a 4 or 5 stars, because it is very informative (considering the space limitations), fun to read, and the colour plates are McBride at his best.

Buy it if you want to have a general idea about Turco-Mongol, Khazar, Pecheneg and other horse peoples of the steppe; it's worth the price.
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Good For Its Brevity. April 14 2006
By SUPPORT THE ASPCA. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
A quick enjoyable read with fine artwork. The text jumps around and does not focus enough on the titles subject. Still it is a good book for begining students and wargamers. These various nomads were clearly an intriguing, tough, and deadly opponents to all who had the misfortune of battling them. Thankfully, they usually did not have the ability and tenacity for long sieges otherwise Civilization as we know it may have been wiped out.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
A Good Source June 23 2005
By Saif T. Beg - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is a very good source for western readers to learn about the Huns without them going into to much details. It is a good source for thier tatics, weapons and other stuff. A 5/5 for this one.

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