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Babylon 5 Volume 5.6

Jerry Doyle , Mira Furlan    Unrated   VHS Tape
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

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Though Babylon 5 never quite achieved the status of the Star Trek series in whose considerably large footsteps it followed, it did manage to create a intriguing and entertaining world. Babylon 5, much more so than Star Trek, relied on long plot arcs to sustain the complexities of its underlying conflicts, so if you missed an episode or two, you may have had a tough time getting back on track. Not to worry! You can now view them on video. Volume 5.6 compiles "Tragedy of the Telepaths" and "Day of the Dead" from the series' fifth season. In "Telepaths," rebel mindreaders use mindpower to resist the forces of Security Chief Zack Allan (Jeff Conaway of Taxi fame) and station commander Lockley (Tracey Scroggins). But for the telepaths, the resolve for nonviolence is starting to crack. "Day of the Dead" features the comedy team of Penn & Teller (as Rebo & Zooty), whose arrival on Babylon 5 reminds President Sheridan (Bruce Boxleitner) that humor is a universal element like hydrogen. Arrivals of another kind remind Babylon 5 dwellers of the preciousness of life when spirits of deceased friends and lovers appear during a Brakari ritual. --Tod Nelson

From the Back Cover

STRANGE DAYS. A freeport to adventure from the fifth season of Babylon 5. A TRAGEDY OF TELEPATHS -- Mind over matter? Holed up in Brown Sector, rebel telepaths use mindpower to resist the forces of Security Chief Zack Allan (Jeff Conaway) and station commander Lochley (Tracy Scoffings). But for the telepaths, the resolve for nonviolence is starting to crack. DAY OF THE DEAD--The arrival of comedy team Rebo & Zooty (Penn & Teller) reminds President Sheridan (Bruce Boxleitner) that humor is a universal element like hydrogen. Arrivals of another kind remind Babylon dwellers of the preciousness of life when spirits of deceased friends and lovers appear during a Brakiri ritual.

Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Two Great Season 5 Babylon 5 Episodes, But... Aug. 4 2001
By John Kwok TOP 500 REVIEWER
I agree with a previous reviewer that this videotape should have contained two consecutively aired episodes. Yet both are among the finest episodes of Season 5, with special praise going to Neil Gaiman's witty "Day of the Dead". "Tragedy of Telepaths" begins a story arc which will finally tell us what happens to the rogue telepath colony on Babylon 5. With much reluctance, Captain Lochley (Tracy Scoggins) contacts Alfred Bester (Walter Koenig), and asks for his help after most of Byron's (Robin Atkin Downes) colony barricades itself in Brown Sector. A few of his followers have escaped above, and forsake Byron's nonviolence when Bester returns. Meanwhile on Centauri Prime Londo Mollari (Peter Jurasik) and G'Kar (Andreas Katsulas) rescue an old friend of G'Kar's from the Royal Palace's prison. In "Day of the Dead" President Sheridan (Bruce Boxleitner) welcomes celebrated comedians Rebo and Zooty (Penn and Teller) to Babylon 5, noting that humor is as universal an element as hydrogen. And the Brakiri prepare part of the station of their "Day of the Dead" festival; old friends, lovers and acquaintances return to visit Mollari (Peter Jurasik), Garibaldi (Jerry Doyle), Lochley, and Lennier (Bill Mumy). We learn a bit more about Lochley's restless, tragic youth.
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4.0 out of 5 stars "Day of the Dead" is B5's "Time's Arrow." Dec 27 1999
In what is probably the most original and challenging of the Star Trek "universes," Day of the Dead is a stand-out episode. The writers of Babylon 5 made a daring assumption: fans are intelligent, well-read, well-educated and live in absolute terror that there's ALWAYS another McCarthy lurking Out There waiting for us to Forget. B5 fed our hearts, our minds -- and our darkest fears. After the Shadow Wars, it also gently chided us with the delightful "Day of the Dead." It not only incorperates references earthly religious traditions, but is also chock full of asides to former episodes. (B5 is a series that loves disembodied heads way too much!) Its richness grows with every viewing. "Day of the Dead" reminds you that, well, no matter where you go, there you are -- and in order to truly appreciate the fact you have to make peace with where you've been.
"Why?"
"Because it tells me to."
Grin.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Over-all two good episodes of an awsome series! Jan. 17 1999
By A Customer
First, "Day of the Dead" seems a little misplaced in the airing order of the series, but that aside, this was a really well done episode. It was interesting to see both Dodger and Morden again, although I thought that Lennier seeing Morden was a little odd. Tracey Scoggins won me over with this episode, although I still like Ivanova better. As for "Tragedy of Telepaths," also a good and interesting episode. Another character, Lyta Alexander won me over with the telepath arc, but again, I miss the other telepath, Talia. These are both wonderful episodes from this excellent series. Well worth repeat viewings.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good episodes, bad ordering Nov. 20 1998
By A Customer
This review is based on the aired versions of the episodes, and as I understand it, the tape versions are the same. It's impossible to do a complete review without mentioning a major problem with the tape - it's out of the airing order. This is the intended ordering of the episodes: 9.A Tragedy of Telepaths 10.Phoenix Rising 11.The Ragged Edge 12.Day of the Dead. Now, with most shows (X-Files, Star Trek, etc), episode ordering is not important; but B5 relies heavily on a 'plot arc', and in this case, "A Tragedy of Telepaths" leaves some things unresovled, which are supposed to be picked up in "Pheonix Rising".
Other than that, however, both episodes are well worth watching. "Day of The Dead" is written by Neil Gaiman, and is one of the best of the early 5th season. It's guest charachters are some of the most interesting that have dropped by B5, and I especially liked how Capt. Lochley's past was fleshed out a little.
"A Tragedy of Telepaths" is good, but is most important in the way it sets up the Byron situation for the next episode. The Londo/G'Kar thread was okay, and resolved something that had been off in the background for some time, something most viewers had forgotten about by season 5.
If you didn't record these when they aired, then I suggest you go out an get them, though the episode order is annoying.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.2 out of 5 stars  4 reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Good episodes, bad ordering Nov. 20 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
This review is based on the aired versions of the episodes, and as I understand it, the tape versions are the same. It's impossible to do a complete review without mentioning a major problem with the tape - it's out of the airing order. This is the intended ordering of the episodes: 9.A Tragedy of Telepaths 10.Phoenix Rising 11.The Ragged Edge 12.Day of the Dead. Now, with most shows (X-Files, Star Trek, etc), episode ordering is not important; but B5 relies heavily on a 'plot arc', and in this case, "A Tragedy of Telepaths" leaves some things unresovled, which are supposed to be picked up in "Pheonix Rising".
Other than that, however, both episodes are well worth watching. "Day of The Dead" is written by Neil Gaiman, and is one of the best of the early 5th season. It's guest charachters are some of the most interesting that have dropped by B5, and I especially liked how Capt. Lochley's past was fleshed out a little.
"A Tragedy of Telepaths" is good, but is most important in the way it sets up the Byron situation for the next episode. The Londo/G'Kar thread was okay, and resolved something that had been off in the background for some time, something most viewers had forgotten about by season 5.
If you didn't record these when they aired, then I suggest you go out an get them, though the episode order is annoying.
4.0 out of 5 stars "Day of the Dead" is B5's "Time's Arrow." Dec 27 1999
By Kayla Rigney - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
In what is probably the most original and challenging of the Star Trek "universes," Day of the Dead is a stand-out episode. The writers of Babylon 5 made a daring assumption: fans are intelligent, well-read, well-educated and live in absolute terror that there's ALWAYS another McCarthy lurking Out There waiting for us to Forget. B5 fed our hearts, our minds -- and our darkest fears. After the Shadow Wars, it also gently chided us with the delightful "Day of the Dead." It not only incorperates references earthly religious traditions, but is also chock full of asides to former episodes. (B5 is a series that loves disembodied heads way too much!) Its richness grows with every viewing. "Day of the Dead" reminds you that, well, no matter where you go, there you are -- and in order to truly appreciate the fact you have to make peace with where you've been.
"Why?"
"Because it tells me to."
Grin.
4.0 out of 5 stars Over-all two good episodes of an awsome series! Jan. 16 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
First, "Day of the Dead" seems a little misplaced in the airing order of the series, but that aside, this was a really well done episode. It was interesting to see both Dodger and Morden again, although I thought that Lennier seeing Morden was a little odd. Tracey Scoggins won me over with this episode, although I still like Ivanova better. As for "Tragedy of Telepaths," also a good and interesting episode. Another character, Lyta Alexander won me over with the telepath arc, but again, I miss the other telepath, Talia. These are both wonderful episodes from this excellent series. Well worth repeat viewings.
5.0 out of 5 stars Two Great Season 5 Babylon 5 Episodes, But... Aug. 4 2001
By John Kwok - Published on Amazon.com
I agree with a previous reviewer that this videotape should have contained two consecutively aired episodes. Yet both are among the finest episodes of Season 5, with special praise going to Neil Gaiman's witty "Day of the Dead". "Tragedy of Telepaths" begins a story arc which will finally tell us what happens to the rogue telepath colony on Babylon 5. With much reluctance, Captain Lochley (Tracy Scoggins) contacts Alfred Bester (Walter Koenig), and asks for his help after most of Byron's (Robin Atkin Downes) colony barricades itself in Brown Sector. A few of his followers have escaped above, and forsake Byron's nonviolence when Bester returns. Meanwhile on Centauri Prime Londo Mollari (Peter Jurasik) and G'Kar (Andreas Katsulas) rescue an old friend of G'Kar's from the Royal Palace's prison. In "Day of the Dead" President Sheridan (Bruce Boxleitner) welcomes celebrated comedians Rebo and Zooty (Penn and Teller) to Babylon 5, noting that humor is as universal an element as hydrogen. And the Brakiri prepare part of the station of their "Day of the Dead" festival; old friends, lovers and acquaintances return to visit Mollari (Peter Jurasik), Garibaldi (Jerry Doyle), Lochley, and Lennier (Bill Mumy). We learn a bit more about Lochley's restless, tragic youth.
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