CDN$ 23.15
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Backyard Poultry Naturally: A Complete Guide to Raising Chickens & Ducks Naturally Paperback – Jan 31 2007


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, Jan 31 2007
"Please retry"
CDN$ 23.15
CDN$ 16.65 CDN$ 19.00

Best Canadian Books of 2014
Margaret Atwood's stunning new collection of stories, Stone Mattress, is our #1 Canadian pick for 2014. See all

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought



Product Details

  • Paperback: 135 pages
  • Publisher: Acres USA (Jan. 31 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1601730047
  • ISBN-13: 978-1601730046
  • Product Dimensions: 1.3 x 17.8 x 24.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 23 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #584,403 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Verified Purchase
Bought this book for my son-in-law who is planning and dreaming about the poultry he will soon raise on their acreage. I'm sure he will enjoy this very much as it has some sound advice and practices explained. We used to raise poultry as well, so he still has his backup help - us! ;)
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 7 reviews
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
Natural Chicken Care Dec 7 2010
By Deanna Dennis - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Ms. Moore provides a wealth of information here not given in most "chicken how-to" books. To clarify my perspective, I am NOT anti-medical establishment, but I DO look first to natural remedies - not expensive "herbal" or "natural" products but rather I forage for weeds, grow some medicinals in my garden, etc., make my own simple tinctures, poultices and infusions. With my family & children this has worked very well. It is cheap and usually better quality than anything you can buy anywhere. We would not hesitate to see our family practice doctor if necessary, but we really don't see him very often (maybe every few years?) as I am usually able to clear up any issues that arise.

We will be raising chickens soon, and I absolutely LOVE the section on this book on caring for and preventing common chicken maladies by incorporating various herbs in bedding, feed, water, and even topically on the chickens. Both acute treatment and tonic nourshment are covered. I can guess what you're thinking, so know that I am NOT against culling when necessary, and in fact "spent hen" is one of our favorite ingredients. However, I do believe the animals whom we have been given dominion over should have plenty of access to sunshine, fresh air, fresh green food, and be slaughtered humanely when the time comes. I believe this so strongly that I actually learned to slaughter chickens so that I could be sure to do it with the least amount of trauma to the birds (and yes, it can be done). At any rate, just as I would not subject my family to conventional drugs as a first line of defense, I am happy to find the info here to provide our chickens with natural health.

There is also a nice section on hatching out chicks under a natural mother (novel!) and also alternatives to conventional feed. I am not a fan of GMO soy or corn in my family's food and we make quite an effort to minimize their presence in our diets - so likewise I am looking to reduce or eliminate these ingredients in our food's food, so to speak.

You will need to do more research on housing, but libraries and the internet are full of great ideas. I found "Fresh-Air Poultry Houses" to be very enlightening and a real stand-alone resource on the subject of chicken housing. Joel Salatin's books also cover deep litter technique in detail which is another way to allow for good air quality with the added advantage of enriching your soil.

The big value in "Backyard Poultry Naturally" is in the sections on remedies, natural brooding, and alternatives to conventional feed. You will not find these topics covered in the other chicken books. If you are like me and try to do things yourself, with fresh ingredients either grown or foraged, then you will find this book a necessary addition to your library.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Good for beginers but lacking in actual natural remedies. Feb. 10 2014
By Ashley P. - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
I was pretty excited to recieve this book. I was hoping for a book specifically on raising poultry with natural methods; using herbal remedies, lists of plants and their uses, which ones to avoid, and other natural solutions to health and dietary needs.

Unfortunately this book is more geared toward beginers in poultry rather than poultry keepers looking to expand their knowledge on natural solutions to health and diet. The actual content other than glossary and sources sited is only 120 pages long. That is including 14 pages in the back of pictures of breeds that were covered in the begining of the book and an appendix of botanical names of plants (not common names, their botanical names, uses and guidelines - just a list of the common name and the botanical name; aka useless information in my opinion).

The first 60 pages (half of the book) cover VERY basic things like housing, fencing, feeders, brooders and breeds.So when the title says "Complete" do take note! This book is also half about ducks and half about chickens which depending on your needs could be good or bad. The author has strong feelings about the food industry and how chickens are being treated and this comes through into the book - especially in the first few pages which are all about this, rather an editorial about the injustices instead of an introduction to the book.

What is good about the book are pages 61-100 (3 sections) covering some of what I was expecting the whole book to contain. The sections are "Poultry Health - Naturally", "Poultry and Permaculture" and "Poultry Plant Profiles". There were some good tips contained in these chapters but not anything that you couldnt find in other sources.

So if you are a beginer this could be a good book to add to your "starting-out" resources because it does cover most of the basics and includes a "taste" of natural remedies and methods. For someone looking for an exhaustive work on natural remedies, plant uses, dietary supplements, etc. this book will disappoint you like it did me and is not worth the money spent on it.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Poultry guide June 30 2013
By MJ - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
For the most part I like this book. By no means is it a "Complete Guide" though. There are nice photos of some of the less common breeds, and has several references to the norms in Australia as the author is Australian. It is a nice source of natural feeding methods and identifies helpful herbs. The author includes good insight on behavior of birds, and ways to prevent poor health by recognizing a healthy bird. It doesn't have ALL the possible scenarios for problems and how to address them. But it has lots of resources to give you an understanding of natural methods for raising and caring for fowl.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Chick knows chicks June 2 2013
By Jay Lively - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
I have not yet finished, but I can also say that I am grateful that have not yet needed to pre-lube with olive oil so far.

Also, experienced . . . 1st hand Ms. Moore's caveat: I have been ninjaed by my chicks, and so far have incurred one face plant secondary to their frollicking. Chicks are fun to watch + like kids are gonna do what they will -let them run free in back yard (fenced in). They seem most happy.

While perhaps an exception, doggie doored entrance I mounted in their condo (left openned unless cold/inside) my chicks don't require gangplank. Jump /fly 3' easily in and out. Second surprise, my Napolean complex 13 lb terrier . . . whom barks at cats @ 200 yrds . . . doesn't fool with my chickens. Not once.

Finally, fertilizer recipe works.

Ms. Moore's book would be a great gift to both a sketical spouse and/or a veteran Rooster. Nicely done Ms. Moore.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Good reference guide May 29 2013
By Lisa of Fresh Eggs Daily - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
This was just about the only guide to natural chicken keeping that I could find on the market. I did get some good information from it and it was a very good starting point to give me some ideas of where to focus my own reading and practical use, but since its an Australian publication, many of the plants mentioned aren't familiar to me here in the US. Regardless, it was definitely worth buying and reading and had there been a bit more on more common herbs and weeds, I would have given it five stars.

Lisa
Fresh Eggs Daily
[...]


Feedback