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Bearing Secrets Mass Market Paperback – Dec 12 2012


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 1 pages
  • Publisher: Berkley (MM); Berkley Pr edition (Dec 12 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0425166414
  • ISBN-13: 978-0425166413
  • Product Dimensions: 10.9 x 2 x 17.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 136 g
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

In his second time out (after The Innocents), "off and on" PI Wil Hardesty takes on a case with a legacy of "sins... that cast shadows across generations." Rooted in the turbulent, anti-war movement of the 1960s, this complex drama has a cast that includes terrorist groups, corrupt attorney Lincoln Stillman and Stillman's lethally beautiful wife, Monika. Hardesty is also struggling to keep his marriage together after his young son's death and his wife's recent miscarriage. The discovery of a plane that crashed in a California lake in 1974, and its $2-million cargo, precipitates former anti-war activist Max Pfeiffer's suicide. He leaves behind his daughter, Holly, and, with her, his conviction that the FBI murdered her mother. Holly is equally convinced that the FBI is responsible for her father's death. Holly hires Hardesty. He turns up solid evidence linking Max to kidnapping, bank robbery and murder 20 years before, which provides a world-shattering epiphany for Holly. After she is kidnapped, Hardesty must find her before she is transformed into the "perfect terrorist" to serve Monika's cause. Although sometimes tenuous, the links between Max, Holly, Stillman and Monika are intriguing enough to keep the reader enthralled as they unfold.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

California private investigator Wil Hardesty investigates the alleged suicide of a Sixties radical at Lake Tahoe. When the FBI reveals evidence connecting the dead man to a 17-year-old kidnapping and murder, a wealthy and unscrupulous lawyer, his coldly manipulative wife, and her ruthless bodyguard rob a bank, fire-bomb a house, and engage in surveillance and murder. Meanwhile, Hardesty's marriage is suffering, and he is forced to cope with his client, the dead man's daughter. Good narrative, inventive plot, striking characters, and psychological depth make this a keeper. Recommended.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

2.8 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

By carl brookins on June 15 2003
Format: Hardcover
Bearing Secrets is a superb novel. One has a tendency to ladle on accolades and fulsome adjectives until the feeling that no book can be THAT good becomes a barrier to readers. Expectations can be raised too high. But this is a superb novel. This complex, rhythmic, multi-textured novel reaches out to the reader and inexorably binds one tighter and tighter.
It starts with hard-nosed PI Wil Hardesty and an anguished cry for help from a prickly, vulnerable, twenty-year-old hardcase named Holly Pfeiffer. Hardesty's marriage is coming apart and he doesn't know how to stop it. Mostly to distract himself from his personal trouble, he agrees to see Holly. But when he gets to her cabin near Lake Tahoe, he is repeatedly, rebuffed. This woman is a product of her radical father's teachings. He was a veteran of Viet Nam, who then returned to Berkley and used his considerable intelligence and skill to harass the authorities and teach military tactics to a violent splinter group of dissidents. Naturally, his activities drew the attention of the establishment.
When Holly's father Max, dies in a fall from a high ledge in the mountains, Holly accuses the FBI of killing him. After all, the gospel according to Max had taught her that years earlier the FBI engineered her mother's death via a car bomb. In spite of her attempts to rid herself of Hardesty, in Holly's view just another establishment lackey, Hardesty begins a patient, earnest attempt to learn some truths. For a time, the only secrets he bares make Max look guilty. But of what? And then....
Read Bearing Secrets and you will be appalled, exhilarated, horrified and energized. This way lies death, explicit and terrible; here lies corruption and there is exploitation. You are quickly caught up in wheels within wheels.
Read more ›
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
After reading The Innocents, the first Wil Hardesty book, I looked forward to Bearing Secrets. Big disappointment! The story begins with the apparent suicide of Max Pfeiffer, a '60s radical, and a call to Hardesty from Pfeiffer's daughter, Holly. At that point the thing goes downhill rapidly. The plot is not a bad idea. Where Barre disappoints is, first, in the seemingly unending problems between Wil and his wife, Lisa. One feels it is time for them to get on with their lives. It is distracting after a time, and the reader must find it hard to identify with either of them, much less sympathize.
Second, the plot is risky. I know I couldn't write it convincingly. But Barre, making a half-hearted effort at some level of believability, fails miserably. The characters are cartoonish, the story told in jerky movements so that we don't know where we are (geographically and chronologically)most of the time. Keep an eye out for Monika and Behr. How did Barre dream them up?
As for the next one in the series I just can't say. I think I may have suffered enough with this overaged surfer dude and all his angst. I realize that a fictional detective needs his/her conflicts and tensions but as much as I liked Wil (and Lisa) at the end of The Innocents, I couln't help thinking "here we go again" at the beginning of Bearing Secrets.
Avoid this one.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Based on the other review I guess I missed it on this one. I really liked The Innocents so I bought the rest of the Wil Hardesty series. Boy, do I wish I had not. If you do decide to read Bearing Secrets be sure to have a pen and paper in hand and write down each character and how they relate to the book. You will need this as it is very confusing. I don't think I have ever read a book that I stayed so lost with the people in it. It goes back seventeen years and brings you up to date. There are just so MANY PEOPLE and groups involved. I ended up reading several pages twice to try to connect who was who. I guess I will read the next one as I already have it and hope it is like the first one and not the second.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Although this one starts off a little slowly, I'd recommend it as one of the best mysteries I've read recently. The plot does a wonderful job of intertwining the past with present, with a surprising and satisfying finish. Wil Hardesty does well again in the lead role, and the 60's backdrop for the historical part of the mystery is well done. Don't miss this one!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5 reviews
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Like Reading One Of The Best Ross MacDonalds Feb. 21 2000
By C. G. Howie - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Although this one starts off a little slowly, I'd recommend it as one of the best mysteries I've read recently. The plot does a wonderful job of intertwining the past with present, with a surprising and satisfying finish. Wil Hardesty does well again in the lead role, and the 60's backdrop for the historical part of the mystery is well done. Don't miss this one!
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
A fine PI novel June 15 2003
By carl brookins - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Bearing Secrets is a superb novel. One has a tendency to ladle on accolades and fulsome adjectives until the feeling that no book can be THAT good becomes a barrier to readers. Expectations can be raised too high. But this is a superb novel. This complex, rhythmic, multi-textured novel reaches out to the reader and inexorably binds one tighter and tighter.
It starts with hard-nosed PI Wil Hardesty and an anguished cry for help from a prickly, vulnerable, twenty-year-old hardcase named Holly Pfeiffer. Hardesty's marriage is coming apart and he doesn't know how to stop it. Mostly to distract himself from his personal trouble, he agrees to see Holly. But when he gets to her cabin near Lake Tahoe, he is repeatedly, rebuffed. This woman is a product of her radical father's teachings. He was a veteran of Viet Nam, who then returned to Berkley and used his considerable intelligence and skill to harass the authorities and teach military tactics to a violent splinter group of dissidents. Naturally, his activities drew the attention of the establishment.
When Holly's father Max, dies in a fall from a high ledge in the mountains, Holly accuses the FBI of killing him. After all, the gospel according to Max had taught her that years earlier the FBI engineered her mother's death via a car bomb. In spite of her attempts to rid herself of Hardesty, in Holly's view just another establishment lackey, Hardesty begins a patient, earnest attempt to learn some truths. For a time, the only secrets he bares make Max look guilty. But of what? And then....
Read Bearing Secrets and you will be appalled, exhilarated, horrified and energized. This way lies death, explicit and terrible; here lies corruption and there is exploitation. You are quickly caught up in wheels within wheels. Barre builds tension and suspense cleanly and handles both with dexterity and believability. Fully-formed characters strive against insidious power, fail under the weight of crushing secrets, and strive again.
Yet author Barre does not dwell lovingly on the horror. This book is cleanly written, carefully plotted and very, very intense. It will require attention and careful reading, but Bearing Secrets will reward you in full measure.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Barre can do better than this Feb. 18 2002
By T. Judd - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
After reading The Innocents, the first Wil Hardesty book, I looked forward to Bearing Secrets. Big disappointment! The story begins with the apparent suicide of Max Pfeiffer, a '60s radical, and a call to Hardesty from Pfeiffer's daughter, Holly. At that point the thing goes downhill rapidly. The plot is not a bad idea. Where Barre disappoints is, first, in the seemingly unending problems between Wil and his wife, Lisa. One feels it is time for them to get on with their lives. It is distracting after a time, and the reader must find it hard to identify with either of them, much less sympathize.
Second, the plot is risky. I know I couldn't write it convincingly. But Barre, making a half-hearted effort at some level of believability, fails miserably. The characters are cartoonish, the story told in jerky movements so that we don't know where we are (geographically and chronologically)most of the time. Keep an eye out for Monika and Behr. How did Barre dream them up?
As for the next one in the series I just can't say. I think I may have suffered enough with this overaged surfer dude and all his angst. I realize that a fictional detective needs his/her conflicts and tensions but as much as I liked Wil (and Lisa) at the end of The Innocents, I couln't help thinking "here we go again" at the beginning of Bearing Secrets.
Avoid this one.
Stylish detective novel Dec 24 2011
By Ciaran Cooke - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is the second Will Hardesty book in the series by Richard Barre.
Hardesty is asked by a young girl to investigate the suicide of her father as she believes he was murdered by the FBI.
The plot involves 1960's radicals, a bank robbery and a plan to create the perfect terrorist.

While elements of the books are familiar (Hardesty is a surfing, troubled Vietnam vet), and the setting in California has been used a lot in detective fiction, it's the writing that draws me back to Barres books.
His style is lean and sharp and is a joy to read. There is a poetic quality to the writing that lifts it above your average detective novel.
I'll certainly be reading the rest of this series.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
BEARING SECRETS---I GUESS I MISSED IT!!!!!! Jan. 3 2002
By Mac Blair - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Based on the other review I guess I missed it on this one. I really liked The Innocents so I bought the rest of the Wil Hardesty series. Boy, do I wish I had not. If you do decide to read Bearing Secrets be sure to have a pen and paper in hand and write down each character and how they relate to the book. You will need this as it is very confusing. I don't think I have ever read a book that I stayed so lost with the people in it. It goes back seventeen years and brings you up to date. There are just so MANY PEOPLE and groups involved. I ended up reading several pages twice to try to connect who was who. I guess I will read the next one as I already have it and hope it is like the first one and not the second.


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